Age?: Just wondering what age folks are... - British Heart Fou...

British Heart Foundation
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Age?

Outforawalk
Outforawalk

Just wondering what age folks are on here, I’m 42 and had HA and stents at the start of March. Of course I feel like I’m the youngest person in the world to have had this happen!!

It would be helpful when reading and comparing notes, recoveries, exercise etc to know if we’re comparing like for like.

111 Replies
oldestnewest

Hi, I’m a very young 62, had an SCA just 2yrs ago whilst in the gym!

Hi there

I was far younger than you when I had my heart catastrophe! It was weird as most heart stuff affects older people (generalisation), but the older people in the waiting room were far fitter than I was 😀

Brandibell
Brandibell
in reply to TRST

I am 46 and felt like this.. No Heart attack..faulty electrics running wrong. Need a New wattage..

I am 39 and have had faulty electrics ( lbbb) for about 6 years now

seasider18
seasider18
in reply to TRST

That was why you were there ?

When I went to cardio rehab after my aortic valve replacement when 79 I was probably the most active one there amongst 50's to 60's others.

Now coming up for 86 and in permanent AF with a pacemaker and an Amplatzer amulet

Hi. I'm 46 and 13 weeks post double heart bypass. Am now trying to get to get my fitness back up and, hopefully, far higher than it was before.

Hello. Please be steady but sure. There's no need to rush you have a good life ahead of you. Take your meds. Do your exercise and laugh with the world. I wish you all the success.

Hi, 63 and a Stemi in Jan 2016. Recovered although always on the mind. Been retired now for just over 3 years. Not for health but because I could so I guess I am fortunate to be to do an early retirement. Take care.

Like you I retired because I could at 59 in 1994 and spent much of our time travelling the world. Glad I did as walking has been a problem for the past five years after having been prescribed Fluoroquinolone for a prostate infection.

See fluoroquinolone toxicity syndrome.

Hi, I am 37 and suffered a HA 2 weeks ago. It’s all still very new to me and I am still waiting for my follow up appointments and cardiac rehab to start but I have started to go for small walks to try and aid my rehabilitation.

Ben

I'm 56 this year, and don't have any heart disease (verified by CAC scan score of zero) despite a stark family history.

I eat less than 120g of low-Gi carbohydrates per day, getting most of my intake from natural fats (about 1.5:1, monounsaturated to saturated).

Exercise is important to improve functional capacity, but is of limited use in prevention of chronic ill-health by itself. A colleague of mine had a heart attack last year despite being a distance runner.

Professor Tim Noakes and Sir Steve Redgrave both developed type 2 diabetes despite being world-class endurance athletes.

Mine was hereditary but my cardio said if I hadn’t played tennis,kept my weight down and eaten a good diet I would have had the attack years ago instead of at 76 - they found my heart was ok but the arteries were not good. So triple bypass for me . Female - waiting To go back to tennis after lock down

Could you ask why it would take so long for an hereditary condition to manifest itself, please?

I asked my cardiologist this question. My mother had angina at 50 so did my father. My brother died at 49. Nearly all my uncles and aunts died of heart disease. My arteries could have been building up plaque for years for all I know.

Yes, my dad had two heart attacks by the age of 58, my cousin died of stroke at 54, mum had type 2 diabetes, and half of my siblings have prediabetes too. Insulin-resistance is rife in our society.

A Dr. Kraft measured his patients' insulin levels, and found three-quarters of them to be insulin-resistant. He concluded that those people with atherosclerosis without diabetes in situ (insulin-resistance) are simply undiagnosed.

Also I smoked 40 years ago. The cardio also said that was a factor

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to Pollypuss

Great game and surely will exercise your heart, Just be careful and take your time. The objective is to succeed in regaining your previous health not further damaging your body. Please enjoy a long an satisfying life.

Pollypuss
Pollypuss
in reply to GOWERBOY

Thanks -yes fortunately I have friends who will help me slowly back

Your statement regarding exercise is not true. I think most of the rest of it is fairly dubious as well to be honest.

The point of exercising and eating well is to tip the scales in your favour - fitter and leaner people generally have fewer health problems. And, generally, have a better immune systems, which is really important right now.

I could not agree more. If you look at the poor people who have fallen victim to this virus a lot of them were overweight and probably did no exercise for years, we have an epidemic of obesity in this country that needs to be addressed.

Well I was just stating what the cardiologists said. Yes there are people out there who are fit and eat the right food and still have HA. This is why more research needs to be done. I do think stress plays a huge part in heart health

Well I was very fit with negative tests apart from chest pain which for two years was diagnosed as muscular. I had a mild heart attack - so mild I drove myself to A &E . What a shock when after an angiogram I was told I had to have a triple bypass. Cardiologist said reason was : 1. It was hereditary 2. I smoked 40 years ago. 3. My age 76 . take your pick. Six months on I am getting ready to go back to tennis. I still cannot work out how I could speedily run up a long stretch of stairs and have no pain a month before my heart attack. I used to be so darn smug about how healthy I was. My heart was ok - but the arteries had a mind of their own. But my cholesterol level had been fine. I am still in a state of shock

I’m 47 and had a heart attack ten weeks ago. The day prior, I was hiking without any apparent problem, and I was a regular hiker. The next day at time of heart attack of my arteries was 100 percent blocked and another was 80 percent. Crazy. I attribute it to 25 years of smoking and genetics.

Yes smoking is such hazard for a healthy heart. Even though I gave up 40 years ago they still said that was a factor. You did well to hike as long as you did with your arteries in that state.

Being able to undertake strenuous exercise just prior to a HA or Angina attack seems common. I was hiking up and down dale in the lake district 3 weeks before my episode, and felt fine, I have asked myself the same questions and there is no real answer, other than we are like a bucket that water is dripping into and one day it just overflows. I think you comment regarding stress is very true - I have recently retired from what I thought was an easy, stress free job, but after 3 or 4 months my blood pressure has gone down from OK anyway to pretty damn low and that's with no BP medication. I do exercise very regularly but this alone has never made such a difference.

Well done

I knew it. I AM old lol lol lol. Monday I turned 68

Bloody youngster. You should be running on the beach in Brighton. Have a great day and look after yourself

My beach is 5 minutes walk away. Brighton is too far :)

Hi, something to aim for. A 10 mile roundtrip walk, with ice cream on the Brighton pier, and then, a quick run home. Dreamtime at last.

when I first was in Peacehaven between staying in India I walked into Brighton from there but now I am further away it's too far. When I can get back to walking it'll be Newhaven tostart with and then maybe Eastbourne though that is hilly - but Seven Sisters

At your own pace and time. No need to rush or worry. The race is to get as fit as possible without any mishaps. Your plan sounds well thought and practical. I bet the heat in India brought a few problems quite apart from the cleanliness.

I love the heat. Now it's bad for me but I had no real problem in India, or Kathmandu, with the heat. Good for arthritic aches and pains I have to say

Yes when we were young and fit the heat was a great benefit and we loved travelling to warm climes. Since the operation we have resumed travel. A bit more upmarket but no difficulties anymore. My second life has started.

We used to split our walks into 6 or 8 mile sections and have walked from Eastbourne to Hastings and about 3/4 of Eastbourne to Brighton

seasider18
seasider18
in reply to GOWERBOY

The Pier is closed. Perhaps it is on the list of things to open soon but they would need to limit numbers

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to seasider18

Hi seasider 18. That news of the closed pier is disappointing. I hope it is opened again. We used to walk along the front there on any day and I seem to remember a constant breeze and a very busy pier.

seasider18
seasider18
in reply to GOWERBOY

It is only closed for the duration of coronavirus.

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to seasider18

I am pleased that it is a temporary measure to close the pier.

And Brighton's shingle is difficult to run on anyway.

Also where I am but the level promenade is quite easy

We look longingly out the window to the South Downs.

The sea for me. One day :)

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to seasider18

Are you trapped in the house or have any physical problems?

seasider18
seasider18
in reply to GOWERBOY

My range is quite limited now.

I was a few years ago prescribed Fluoroquinolone/Cipro for a prostate infection when in to have my aortic valve replaced and it gave me tendonitis and later Fluoroquinolone Toxicity Syndrome and I now use a rollator or an electric wheelchair.

Look up floxiehope.com/ and know to avoid this drug.

If it doesn't get you the first time it can later. My Cipro neuropathy problem was dormant after the initial tendonitis until a follow up antibiotic CLARITHROMYCIN and the cardiac drug Bisopprolol each later triggered a wider range of symptoms.

Age does bring this bloody balancing problem with all the other body deteriorations

True

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to seasider18

Always was. Where I live now we have genuine sand and walking presents different problems.

A belated happy birthday to you!

You can't be old; I don't reach state retirement age until 67 :-)

It depends. SOme days I'm older than others hehehe

I want to stay old as long as I can :-) They say that Eastbourne is Gods waiting room. I had two neighbours reach 102 and have a few in their 90's and we are not in retirement flats.

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to seasider18

That's a lovely turn of phrase Gods waiting room. I remember that Eastbourne had millions of Golden Oldies living there. Of course now we are getting to that age we appreciate the same things as they did

seasider18
seasider18
in reply to GOWERBOY

There is a younger element moving in now and the average is coming down but our local bus that comes down from Meads is still a Senior Special and the drivers allow extra time for passengers. At the moment it often travels empty.

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to seasider18

Its lovely that the age is gong down . More nights of drugs and partying

We have the drugs to keep us alive but do we have the legs to dance through the night? A great bus service makes life so much easier for us golden oldies.

seasider18
seasider18
in reply to GOWERBOY

They are prisoners in Meads as the last bus is at 6.30! We had actually made a couple of offers for a flat up there that was in an old manor house in about 2 1/2 acres but eventually glad that we did not get it. We are now just over from Devonshire Park tennis.

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to seasider18

Same with us on Gower. Our bus services have been reduced to the bare minimum, and after certain time no bus services at all. We have great walks to and from the different bays that surround us.

My target, no matter how unlikely or impossible, is 120 years :)

I'll come to your party.

:)

Hi there - I had a ‘widow maker’ (v bad) HA a little over a year ago at the age of 46, which did extensive and lasting damage. No risk factors present and I was an avid runner and gym-goer who had recently completed a mountain marathon. It’s been an interesting ride since.

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to Jonah72

Very best of health in the future Were you ever previously diagnosed with any other life threatening conditions.?

Jonah72
Jonah72
in reply to GOWERBOY

Nope, nothing at all and never had a hospital admission in my life! The medics have all scratched their heads, shrugged and suggested it was just bad luck. Combination of a small piece of plaque in the main LAD artery (elsewhere completely clear) combined with work stress and high intensity exercise.

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to Jonah72

Worry and stress. There should be something we could buy apart from drugs to relieve the pressures we put on ourselves. I suppose we bugger up our own lives and cause great concern for others around us. Thereby completing the stress circle and pop the HA.

Hi Outforawalk

Pretty much the same as you.

I was 43 and had my HA at the end of February. Remember, heart disease is hereditary so even if you thought you were really healthy, sometimes luck just isn’t on your side. All that said, with the right exercise, medication and healthy diet you can have a long healthy life. I am still doing the heart healthy exercise programme from BHF. I am on level 5 and using 1kg weights in each hand to also build up strength as well as aerobic exercise. I love the exercises as each time I complete the hour workout without having any pain it reassures me that my heart is strong!

I'm 57, I was diagnosed with heart failure aged 55. MRI subsequently showed a small silent heart attack some years ago. I was, or so I thought, a very fit and healthy 55 year old before my diagnosis which came about as a result of a check up for something else.

I’m 36. I had a HA 6 months ago tomorrow 13/nov all because of a virus! I was very fit and healthy but over weight. I will be fit again.

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to YeahIcan

I'm over 70 I was grossly overweight for a 5' 8 man. Got up to 23 stone at one stage in my life. I did silly thigs not going to the doctor. Business pressure dictated my life. Making a buck was paramount. The stress was unbelievable. My Doctor lives a couple of doors from us . He made me go and have these tests. Thank goodness.

I had a 5 way bypass at 48 followed by 4 stents before my next birthday. 3 way bypass at age 59.

Well I’m 77 year old female after triple bypass my cardiologist said I can go back to tennis in June after the op six months ago

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to Pollypuss

I don't play tennis, otherwise I would offer to play you the first game upon returning to the court. I wish you the best of luck in beating your first opponent.

Hi there,

I am afraid you lose on the age thing! I was mid 30's, and I had the same bad luck as your good self. Twenty years later and I have really looked after myself as best I can and I feel pretty good.

Careful eating and drinking and lots of exercise. It has worked wonders for me.

That is not to say it has been a breeze, I have had the odd setback, and had further trips back to hospital when I thought something was up, but it wasn't. All in the mind it was. Your brain certainly plays tricks with you, you need to come to terms with that.

It took many months, a couple of years actually, to stop worrying completely, every day. But it can be done with a positive mental attitude.

You are on a start of a long journey, taking care of yourself and listening to your body.

Good Luck!

Prada47
Prada47
in reply to Fitzjohns

I can black cat you on age I was 34 when I had an MI which was early 1982.

I didn't have any medication until I saw my GP in 2015. After having an ECG my GP contacted cardiology. So all the relevant tests carried out followed by a Bypass RCA can't be cleared. 2018 I had 2 stents fitted into my LAD which had been bypassed !!. Oh and HF diagnosed with a low 40s reading. So a very young and quite active 73 year old, who thinks he is around 40 like my EF

Stay Alert Stay Well

Hi there, 39 myself and had my widow maker in March - thought it was in okay shape, played football twice a week and had started tennis, not really a drinker. Eating is probably my vice but apparently my cholesterol was okay so probably bad luck. Worst thing about having it Young was having no idea about the symptoms and leaving it so long doing more damage.

I was 41 when I had my ha last sept had 1 stent put in , off work for 4 months x x x

Hi. I am 44 y old and had HA and quadruple bypass in March 2020. Recovery slow but surely happening. Just anxiousness that is a problem. Hope that you are well.

I'm 56 and had a hypertensive crisis last March...bp now controlled and low but some arrhythmia.

Hi

My first post on here. 67 years old. Had an AV replacement recently. Hereditary problem with valve design. Had a few AF episodes. Feeling fine now, just doing the rehab physio thing. Good luck with everything!

080311
080311
in reply to kev52

Hello kev52

Welcome to the forum, I to have had AVR but nearly 4 years ago, so pleased to read you are doing well, it’s onwards and upwards.

Stay safe best wishes Pauline

kev52
kev52
in reply to 080311

Many thanks indeed, Pauline! And the very same to you!

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to kev52

Welcome. I am a new member myself but the board is full of good information to get you up and running safely.

kev52
kev52
in reply to GOWERBOY

Cheers, GOWERBOY. I appreciate the welcome!

53 now, but diagnosed with permanent AF in my late thirties. Still exercising, trying to eat well, and not too many side effects from taking Verapamil.

If you really want to feel young, try the geriatric clinic. I had a spell of visual migraines, and the doctors wanted to rule out mini strokes. I think that day I was the only person who had managed to walk in to the clinic on their own - the nurses thought I'd taken a wrong turning. My friends at work thought it was hilarious when I told them where I had been.

Outforawalk
Outforawalk
in reply to Jaws66

Reading through the replies and that made me laugh, take care.

Prada47
Prada47
in reply to Jaws66

I was in the Heart Clinic and I turned to my Wife and quietly said " Have you noticed the people in here are quite old " Yes she said and just gave me the look that said and you are !!!

Stay Alert and Stay Well

My husband was 46 years old when he had the first heart attack. He is now nearly 67 years old. He has had lots of problems in the intervening years with stents, heart failure, an ICD -CRT fitted but is still with generally not too bad. The Cardiologists are learning all the time and it is wonderful their commitment. Do what you are told and you will improve. Keep well and take care.

STEMI at 45 to the median RCA, 13 months ago. Diffuse disease with both the proximal and distal RCA plus the D1, D2 and median LAD occluded at more than 70%. These are currently managed by medication.

Fitted another stent to the proximal LAD as an elective op 9 months back.

Still anxious. Besieged almost daily with what I would call an irreversible chronic condition. Currently amplified by Covid 19.

Supposedly healthy. Non smoker and drinker. Cardiologist said it might be hereditary given the diffuse nature at such a relatively young age.

It is getting better, albeit extremely slowly. Either that or I'm getting comfortable with a shorter than expected lease of life. I'm less prone to putting off things now.

Hi, I was 35 when I had a silent heart attack. i felt fit as a fiddle, not over weight ate well, no hi cholesterol I've always had high bp that's been controlled by meds. I'm 40 next week, I have a really physical job and I can blast out a HIIT work out as good as anyone with no difficulties. Still on lots of meds and just try and be more mindful about my health. In the end I was told it may have been stress related as I was at the time going to through a messy divorce.

The stress.....I'm still working on x

50 I got 4 stents in November. 3 RCA and 1 LAD .

hello I'm 19 and had a HA in September 2019.

I was 45 when I had a heart attack and subsequent cardiac arrest and a stent implanted at the end of January 2019. After numerous tests, it was decided that stress was the main contributing factor. (For the past 10+ years, I have had to deal with some extremely stressful situations both at home and work, with very limited help). I undertook the cardiac fitness rehab group, made some lovely friends who have experienced similar issues (older in most cases but extremely welcoming and, more importantly, up for a laugh!). I still attend one session a week at a local school. Do not skip the rehabilitation exercises as it really does help your recovery etc. I also walk several times a week and, since schools have been closed, I take the kids with me. I've had to become more 'selfish', which doesn't come naturally to me. Work/colleagues have been great and it was nice to get back into a routine once my doctor felt I was 'fit and ready'. Good luck with your recovery. Trust me, it does get better.

I’m new to this website but reading many of the posts I can see many of you like myself were fit - some had good reading for BP and cholesterol also like myself. I just have a feeling something is missing here. I feel there is a place for much further research. I would suggest stress plays a major role . Met a guy on holiday who ran 4 miles a day and swam 3 miles. Eat all the right food but his cholesterol level he said was dangerously high and he said so was his father’s who died at 98 . He refused to take statins. It’s just a small point. I had a very stressful couple of years before my HA. I still don’t know if I would have had one if it hadn’t been for the stress.a

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to Pollypuss

Welcome I am also a new member. Such a wide range of great advice and different experiences about all our different heart problems. I notice that you mention that someone who wouldn't take statins. I am on statins and have a great concern that I am creating problems for myself. Does anyone have a negative view on statin use or otherwise.

Pollypuss
Pollypuss
in reply to GOWERBOY

Well I had such a bad reaction to all the medication after my triple bypass ( diarrhoea and constantly feeling sick) that my cardiologist took me off the lot at my three month check up apart from aspirin. My cholesterol level was unusually high when I came out of hospital after two months because of hospital food. Am now back on my old diet - lots of oily fish and veg and porridge etc and Benacol. I tried statins but my stomach swelled up so much that I could hardly breath! I was one of these odd people who before my heart attack had perfect blood pressure and cholesterol but they took 2 years to diagnose the pain in my chest was not muscular. I meet many people who tolerate statins well - it’s a problem that needs to have more research as we are not all the same. Don’t let it stress you though - discuss it with your doctor.

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to Pollypuss

Thanks Pollypuss for the info. I am researching to formulate an opinion and make a decision on my statins. My doctor is a personal friend and is now also a Professor and keeps on telling me that he doesn't want to face my family if I drop down dead. His opinion is everybody should take a daily statin. He may be a little biased.

Pollypuss
Pollypuss
in reply to GOWERBOY

Thanks for your reply. What I would like to know is that if ones cholesterol level is ok why should everyone be on statins? Surely that can’t be right.

84green
84green
in reply to Pollypuss

I think statins don’t just lower cholesterol. For people with existing heart disease they also stabilise plaques (making them less likely to rupture) and also reduce inflammation which is generally the precursor to damage to the arterial linings. My understanding is that for people with existing disease an overall cholesterol level below 4.0 is the objective to slow progression.

Prior to my diagnosis my cholesterol had never been high. It was 5.0, now 3.1.

I have “minimal and mild” blockages and my cardiologist believes statins to be an important part of my treatment to halt/ slow the disease. I’m happy to be guided by his knowledge and experience but understand that the use of statins provokes strong feelings.

Many believe that diet and lifestyle changes can have the same effect. That may well be correct. I’m happy to try both in tandem - medication and lifestyle.

Pollypuss
Pollypuss
in reply to 84green

Well good luck - let me know how you get on

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to 84green

84 green I hope you succeed and reduce the inflammation and potential blockages.

84green
84green
in reply to GOWERBOY

Thanks. My cardiologist did say that if my statin (Atorvastatin) causes a problem then we could try other brands and/ or dosages as different people react differently to different statins. May be worth your while discussing this with your GP. He is adamant that they will help me.

I’m doing all I can to slow the progression of my CAD and avoid/ delay surgery. My problems (unlike many here) are of my own making - diet, lifestyle, stress, always putting off the need to get in shape.

The CAD diagnosis was the kick start to make long overdue changes. I have lost 62lbs since January. Blood sugar and blood pressure now both in the normal range. Exercise at least an hour a day. Shock though it was, the diagnosis (which came about by chance) could have been worse and, without it, I would still be living the same life.

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to Pollypuss

I would suggest that you are right Pollypuss , and that was, and is still, my way of thinking. He had constantly tried to get me to take statins for many years. High blood pressure, business pressures, sedentary lifestyle all seemed too be ideal for statin prescription.

080311
080311
in reply to GOWERBOY

My husband is on statin, never had high cholesterol but had a stroke, when I asked why he had been put on it in the hospital was told statins aren’t just for cholesterol it was a preventative measure to avoid another stroke, the blood clot came from his artery in his neck so the statin is supposed to help avoid it happening again. Trouble at the moment he is having some rash issues so as been taken off for 2 weeks to see if it’s that. Trying to show the doctor on a video call the right bit of his body with the iPad camera is a new experience! I have had open heart surgery for AVR and bypass but not on a statin. 4 lots of other drugs.

GOWERBOY
GOWERBOY
in reply to 080311

thanks for the information 080311. I am sorry to read that he has rash problems. Very irritating annoying and unsettling. I am on 6 other medications that are taken religiously at 3 different times daily. Sometimes I have forgotten and then though I still take them later I am not sure that they are being effective.

Well done rehab is paramount.

I am 68,,,3 failed stent ops,,,,on 7 tablets a day,,sleeping like a log,,,,just doing awalk each day,,,plenty of gardening. ,,feeling fine ,,,just a bit slower,,,,take care !

You seem to have cracked it. It is great to go in the garden and just enjoy work .

I’m 59 - NSTEMI @ 57 and a pacemaker fitted at 57 also a type 1 diabetic of 44yrs

I'm saying nothing after reading those threads. 👍 to one & all. 🙄

I’m 44 and have terrible PVCS and PAC. Nothing seems to help.

I think we all vary quite a bit in age but love this group of wonderful caring people.

I have not had a HA but worry about heart failure with all I’m having.

Hope you feel better soon!

56 - heart failure CRT-D fitted March 2020

Hi I was 36 when I had my first heart attack and then had 4 on the bounce lots of stents that didn't wrk or wrkd at the time to save me then quadruple bypass at 37 my tip to anyone is stay positive exercise not that I do it now but did and it really helps good luck and here if you need to chat xxx

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