Aortic & Mitral valve surgery - British Heart Fou...

British Heart Foundation
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Aortic & Mitral valve surgery

Dickydon
Dickydon
β€’29 Replies

Hey, I shortly will be having surgery to replace the Aortic & Mitral valves. Has anyone had this surgery/op done and can offer up any experiences?

Thanks!

29 Replies
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Try and get as many of your ducks in row as you can. Smoker? Got to go. Overweight? Lose some if you can. Gentle exercise always a good idea.

Get a nice warm dressing gown, a V shaped pillow and a small handbell so that you can be waited on hand and foot, should work for about a fortnight.

Take it easy at first but gradually walk no from room to room, lamppost to lamppost, end of road and back, etc.

Remember that the medical mob sawed your breastbone in half and it has to be given time to knit back together. After 8-10 weeks the rehab staff will encourage you to join them and get you moving.

Try not to spend all your money on holidays when you are fully up to speed, there is a whole new world out there.

Dickydon
Dickydon
in reply to Ianc2

Thanks lanc2, for your anecdotal experiences. Don't smoke or drink alcohol, my diet is okay eat lots of fish, good oils, butter, but a weakness for sourdough bread. Otherwise , I quite good with most things. Holidays a nono for me travel too much with work enjoy home comforts when I'm not working. So Fingers crossed all should go to plan.

Thanks

MichaelJH
MichaelJHHeart Star

Some good advice from Ianc2. I suspect being Type I diabetic your diet is pretty good but if you can tweak it then do so. I have been Type I for over half a century and had open heart surgery (quadruple bypass) last year. As you probably know for the operation and for a while thereafter you will be in s sliding scale. I found I felt a lot better once off it as the control was far from perfect.

MichaelJH
MichaelJHHeart Star
in reply to MichaelJH

Oops, accidentally posted to soon!

A friend's wife had one valve (mitral) replaced and two repaired. There were a few issues getting BP medication right afterwards but six months on she was fine and a year on you would not have known there had been a problem!

Dickydon
Dickydon
in reply to MichaelJH

Thanks MichaelJH, for your valued input. Wow! Type 1, over half a century, nearly 44yrs with me. Control ain't been perfect over the years, but do have neuropathy in feet &

hands . Still managing to run around as a tv cameraman, for how much longer I'm not sure. Eyesight pretty good still. Luck of the draw I think it's sometimes, like those beer belly jam donut smoker types who live to a ripe old age and never have health issues I wonder why?

Thanks

foxglove
foxglove
in reply to Dickydon

Probably because they don't worry or wonder!!!

Dickydon
Dickydon
in reply to foxglove

I think your right there foxglove, the mind is an amazing and complexed piece of machinery.

foxglove
foxglove
in reply to Dickydon

Glad you took my comment the way it was meant! Though sometimes a good bit of worry passes the time I'm by nature a worrier ( one dr. i saw at our surgery called me a worry wart!)I worry if I don't have a worry if you know what I mean.)WONDER if MY mind is amazing and complex? Of course you will realise I am being flippant now. Good on you managing the run around that your job involves Long may it continue. Regards

Dickydon
Dickydon
in reply to foxglove

Absolutely. Our thoughts do create our reality and I believe that. We must always be cautious what we say, wish for and think hard enough about whatever, as the likely hood of it materialising are pretty high.

there is much to be said and enough qualified research that confirms that.

There's a great book that I highly recommend to anyone and I've been a fan of him for many years. Bruce Lipton PhD, Biology of Belief; Dr Lipton is a cell biologist.

foxglove
foxglove
in reply to Dickydon

Thanks will investigate the book and is wise to be careful of what one wishes for...found this out the hard way!

Dickydon
Dickydon
in reply to foxglove

πŸ‘πŸ»

MichaelJH
MichaelJHHeart Star
in reply to Dickydon

Apologies, I meant to reply earlier. At 44 years I imagine you started with the urine tests although you may have received disposable needles. The ones you had to boil and sharpen were a nightmare for my parents and me. My problems started after I broke my femur. A couple of years on on I started getting cramps in my calf and was diagnosed with PAD. Since then it seems PAD and then CVD have been my background theme along with the diabetes. As you are having valves replaced it sounds as if your arteries are fine. My cardiolgist agrees my issue is hereditary (with diabetes being a complication) but many others jump on the "it's because you have diabetes". But then some get so confused by the media I have been told "you must have been a fat child"! Fat children were quite rare when I was a child and I was actually quite thin.

Dickydon
Dickydon
in reply to MichaelJH

Haaah, thanks Michael. I don't remember sharpening anything, but do remember the glass syringes I used back in the 70's and the animal insulin's pork/beef insulin can't quite remember now. Now I use the orange coloured Novorapid pen. Recently started using the Libre glucose monitoring, where you wear the patch on your arm so no more finger pricking for blood sugar tests.

And yes, type 1 diabetes just complexes things with the heart rather than being the protagonist of all its problems.

I posted earlier though, about the Catheterisation Angiogram I had last Thursday, as it was inserted via the groin but a week on and I'm finding there a dull ache from the area and is annoying to say the least with everything else going on. Is that expected if you know Michael?

MichaelJH
MichaelJHHeart Star
in reply to Dickydon

The change to disposal needles came gradually. Initially you only got prescribed 25 for six months - to use when travelling, etc. Fully disposable syringes took longer but dates are now hazier than a pea souper! Will ask about Libre next time. Previous requests were refused as I am not "pumping"!

They used the groin for the leg angioplasty and I had a large black bruise afterwards that started easing after three days. The coronary angiogram was via the wrist. Nothing more than slightly sore for a few days. I would give the cath lab a call before the weekend to double check things.

Dickydon
Dickydon
in reply to MichaelJH

Yes, I remember the supply issue with the disposable syringes. Also the alcohol wipes to clean the injection site each time. Remember my mum weighing everything and being regimented with diet and everything. But I do suffer with neuropathy in feet, lower legs and hands and my right leg feels a bit worse since the groin invasive route.

I'm def not on the insulin pump. But the diabetic clinic had no prob with me having a Libre. Seem to have more control as it's so much easier and quicker to get your glucose readings.

MichaelJH
MichaelJHHeart Star
in reply to Dickydon

Definitely a question (ref Libre) for next review. I have to donate an armful of blood in preparation in a few weeks time. πŸ’ͺ πŸ†Ž

Dickydon
Dickydon
in reply to MichaelJH

I remember the urine tests very well.

MichaelJH
MichaelJHHeart Star
in reply to Dickydon

Test: how many drops of water and urine? πŸ˜€

Dickydon
Dickydon
in reply to MichaelJH

Haaaah, can't remember water only wee wee where I'd dip strip through the flow.

MichaelJH
MichaelJHHeart Star
in reply to Dickydon

I still occasionally use those strips, Dextostix, to check I have been given a diet coke when not from a bottle or tin.

The tablets were called Clinitest tablets. You put 5 drops of urine in a test tube, added 10 of water and dropped in a tablet. After the boiling stopped you waited 15(?) seconds, shook, and compared to a colour chart for a reading between 0% and 2%. By using 2 drops of urine you could allegedly cover 2% to 5% but we never bothered as it was not that clear and you were already bad! I cannot imagine it being given to individuals these days as I am sure gloves and goggles would be required as a minimum. The tablets were hydroscopic and toxic! It would compare to your Libre like a single cylinder Benz to a Tesla!

Dickydon
Dickydon
in reply to MichaelJH

Wow! That's before my time then.

MichaelJH
MichaelJHHeart Star
in reply to Dickydon

Here's a video. About the last two and a half minutes refer to Clinitest. I used this till the early - mid eighties! Dextostix had to be brought as the local clinic would not prescribe them! :(

I had mitral valve done last January wdnt back to work full time after 9 weeks. Only got one follow up appt at epworth and one at my local hospital no rehab as no staff! Probably went back to work too soon. No follow up appts not even with my gp. Good job I work in a surgery as gp there has been looking after me with any problems. Good luck and hope goes well!

Well done and thanks

Should have said Papworth hospital silly predicted texts lol!

The worst part was on day two when two physios got me out of bed and walked me down the long hospital corridor and up two flights of stairs. There was a chair at the end of the corridor and on each landing to rest on.

Totally exhausted when back to bed and covered in perspiration where my lunch had been left by my bed and was cold.

After that I was walking around the ward with my three attachments as I had had a catheter in and a container collecting fluid from my lung that you will not need as well as the normal drip.

Dickydon
Dickydon
in reply to seasider18

Blimey, day two, I think I'd want a few more days before they start getting you to run marathons. But well done regardless.

seasider18
seasider18
in reply to Dickydon

A nurse had me out of bed the afternoon after the operation when I left ICU for the main ward and walked me to the bathroom and gave me a very thorough wash down. My wife was surprised to see me sitting in a chair when she came to see me.

Dickydon
Dickydon
in reply to seasider18

The ole nurse did the trick.

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