British Heart Foundation
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CONTRADICTORY ADVICE

Which diet is right? Diabetes UK say - eliminate carbs and sugars and you can eat protein and fats - and that means most fruit should be eliminated. BHF say avoid fats (that's butter, cheese, etc.) and have fruit.

Who do I believe?

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Here in the USA most docs advise a balanced diet and diabetics are allowed a certain # of carbs daily. Carbs are important to our health as are healthy fats and proteins

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Unfortunately, most of the developed world follows the USA's example, and we have a very skewed idea of what a balanced diet is.

Removing the fat from milk for example causes the insulin index to rise from 24 for whole milk to 60 for skimmed. Hyperinsulinaemia causes insulin resistance that is the root cause of most chronic heart disease.

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Im not diabetic but have sat in on some classes. With carbs, alot depends on the blood sugar control, how active the person is, age etc.

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The biggest determinant of blood glucose levels is the glycaemic load; Gi multiplied by amount of carbohydrate.

Even world class endurance athletes such as Professor Tim Noakes and Sir Steve Redgrave developed type 2 from a high carbohydrate diet.

As for age, the risk of diabetes increases with age because of what we eat in the so called civilised world.

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Steve Redgrave was misdiagnosed Type II but is actually Type I. The same happened to Theresa May. I suspect one or both could be Type 1.5 like a friend of mine. However, this is not the time and place for that discussion.

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Sir Steve chose to go on insulin.

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The reports of Type II are just the media (and internet) getting things upside down! :)

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And Sir Steve is still under the same delusion? express.co.uk/life-style/li...

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It was Type I originally. As said I suspect it is actually Type 1.5

theguardian.com/observer/os...

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You don't think that paper made a mistake, assuming he was type 1 because he injected insulin? I've seen it explained several times since that Sir Steve opted for insulin to keep a higher carbohydrate intake. I hope he's been educated since that high insulin levels are just as bad for health. It doesn't look like it from the link I posted; he has neuropathy and still thinks it's okay to eat sweet puddings in addition to his meal as long as he adjusts his insulin.

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The BHF have a plate that tells you the correct balance whatever your health issues. So don't be worried. As long as you eat a certain amount by a certain time of day😊

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The Perfect Health Diet has a factual way of determining how much carbohydrate is optimal. If we eat too little, the deficit is (attempted to be) made up from the other macro-nutrients.

If we eat too much carbohydrate, the excess is converted to fat.

For most people that optimal level is between 480 and 640 kcal of low Gi carbohydrates per day. The body actually uses twice as much energy in the form of fat compared to carbohydrate.

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I just think, find a health balance. And the BHF has that guide line. I have beaten all the odds, so I think that you should follow a little bit of everything will do you good. Not too much of any one thing.

Moderate everything including exorcise. If you do too much off it, it's going to to be bad. Jus eat plenty of healthy and lots if exorcise. That can be walking, swimming the gym etc 😊

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As I said before, unfortunately our perception of what a balanced diet is has been severely skewed. BHF follow the Eatwell Guide, which is not significantly different from the USA advice. Within a year of the USA including the importance of having a sustainable diet, the Eatwell Guide followed suit.

A Southport doctor said that to a carbohydrate intolerant person, a moderate amount of carbohydrate is moderately poisoning them.

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So in that case you have to do your own studies.

Try a little bit of this and a little bit of that. Monitor your self. If you don't feel so good, then you know it's wrong for you. What is right for one person may not be right for you.

I stil feel you have to get to know your own body.

I have IBS. Sometimes something may work for me. But get me on a different day in a different mood, things may change. If I am stressed etc, it can effect my tummy then make me really ill.

As long as you are keeping to a balance you may not always feel your best. But you body appreciates what you are putting in to it.

Little and often with exorcise is the best 😊😊😊

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Keeping your insulin levels down is the key. See insulinandmore.com/2018/01/... and

All the best!

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Actually, Diabetes UK don't advise eliminating carbohydrates or sugars. They have relatively recently conceded that a low-carbohydrate diet is suitable for some people, and NICE guidelines say that the amount of carbohydrate should be tailored to suit the person.

Most UK authorities are still entrenched in a low-fat diet, which is a shame because it lowers people's hope and expectations of what can be achieved by eating healthily. PREDIMED proved for example that a Mediterranean diet with nuts or olive oil was 30% better at avoiding cardiac incidents, and reducing carbohydrate load would be far better.

We need to focus on the quality and quantity of carbohydrate we eat, because despite what we've been told many high-fibre foods are turned to glucose faster than table sugar in the body phcuk.org/sugar .

Halving the RDA would provide enough carbohydrate for most people, and we need to send out the message that excess carbohydrate is not a 'safe' alternative to fat.

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Wow Concerned, that is really interesting information.

I am also very concerned about the contradictory dietary advice I received post heart attack and have long believed excess sugar consumption contributed to my Cholesterol issues and subsequent heart disease.

I have been trying to follow a low sugar diet but am stunned by the posters you have linked too. Clearly I still have issues. I eat fruit in the belief it is an OK way to add sweetness to my diet, now I am not so sure.

Do you follow a low GI diet?

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This is the link to the Low Carb diet that I was advised to go on by NHS: lowcarbprogram.com/

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I do, and I don't have any calcification of my heart, unlike many of my family.

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I'm type 2 and post heart attack have been told to eat plenty pasta rice grains but if I ate that my sugar would spike out of control. I try to follow Mediterranean diet and have came off dapagluflozin only on 1.2 doze of Victoria so it's working. Just trial and error I suppose

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Cut out bad fat and salt

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My husband was diagnosed as type 2 at time of CA. He was given stupid advice by the diabetic team, low calorie intake (almost the 800cals per day diet) and eat Whatever he wants by the cardiac team and we will control everything with drugs.

Luckily my mother had been a diabetic for many years controlling her diabetes by diet alone until she was in her 80s.

I threw out all the advice from the medical profession and put him on a carb, calorie controlled diet that allowed him to eat healthily, so he had good fats, appropriate portions of carbs, plenty of fresh veg and fruit intake was sensible. He drinks.

His sugars are now pre diabetic level, he has been discharged by cardio team as his heart has recovered amazingly well. His cholesterol is in the normal range.

He walks for miles as his exercise.

Our motto is anything in moderation, but be sensible.

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I think the most important thing is to eat fresh and natural foods. Eliminate as much processed food as possible. I love Dr Michael Mosely. Everything he says about the Mediterranean diet makes a lot of sense to me. I watch his TV shows, read his books/articles and have listened to a number of podcasts he has been interviewed on.

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Dr Gupta's video on food is very good on York cardiology. Apparently the Mediterranean diet is much healthy for the heart, and is clinically proven his video explains why.

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If you cook carbs- say pasta, let it cool completely then reheat to eat it you will find that the carb content is reduced and a better form of resistance carbs is achieved- this may be good for you; some foods that contain resistance starch are oats, cooled and reheated rice, cooled and reheated pasta, cooled and reheated potatoes, cooled and reheated grains such as barley, millet, rye, bran and dry seeds and wholegrains. Check it out see if it helps.

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For everyone who replied - thanks very much. It seems we are on a journey. The following is the link to the Low Carb diet as recommended by NHS: lowcarbprogram.com/

I also signed up to Active 10 and have the app on my phone. My problem is that I am studying in my not-so-young age and so spend a lot of time behind a desk.

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My dr told me eat less of salt, sugar, fat in that order.

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Both of them are right and both are wrong! Not helpful I know but too often these things get horribly over simplified. There is a real debate over fats in the diet and whether they are really bad for you. What just about everyone believes is that too much sugar is definitely bad for you. The answer has to be a balanced diet and avoid anything that is very high in saturated fat and/or sugar. Basically that will be almost everything that is highly processed. Avoid high white starches (potatoes, white flour, white pasta), avoid fruit juices but eat the whole fruit. There are just so many permutations out there I think you have to take note of the general advice and then go with what works for you

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Look up a wholefood plantbased diet (WFPB). It will address both diseases (type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease) as well as high blood pressure. It will start reversing these diseases and you may have to come off medications too as your body recovers. The science is available at nutritionfacts.org.

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I have the same problem , diagnosed type 2 diabetes in January , couldn't take metamorfin so controlled it with low carb high fat diet , 5 weeks ago had a heart attack and had 3 stents fitted , the diet for my heart totally contradicts the diet for my diabetes , over the last few yeRs I've lost nearly 5 stone and still ended up with a heart attack , I'm just has confused as you as to what to eat now ....

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It’s getting the balance right, unfortunately the medical profession on occasion do not seem to be able to see the whole picture. Diabetes is a silent killer, people don’t seem to realise the effects it can have on the body. A low carb, calorie diet can control the diabetes, but then you also need to eat healthily and sensibly for the cardio problems. Don’t worry too much your diabetic diet won’t harm your cardio problems if anything it will help, you do however need to build your strength up following the heart attack. Balance is everything. See what I said earlier about my husbands diet. He eats everything and anything although I look for lean meats, not too much processed food, oily fish, he has pasta, potatoes, finds rice affects his sugar levels tho, other changes we’ve made are wholemeal whenever possible, bread, pasta rice etc. Lots of veg and fruit. Not eating after 8pm is another. Slow release carbs for breakfast: oats, porridge or other healthy cereals, with the occasional egg and bacon sandwich.

We were told he problem had major heart problems and the undiagnosed diabetes probably hid the symptoms as the diabetes causes nerve damage.

You’ll solve your diet just don’t stress about it too much. Eat healthily and exercise whenever possible, walk to the shop, walk everywhere which is what we do.

Good luck

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Thank you so much for your reply , I really appreciate it ..

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Found this, which is incredibly sensible.

webmd.com/heart-disease/gui...

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