Wood smoke

Hi, just wondering what the view of asthma UK is on the recent proliferation of wood burning stoves? These give me a real problem. Two years ago I lived in an area with good air quality, now most every night is like bonfire night and I use a mask to go outside. It’s been known for many years in Scandinavia that these stoves cause pollution, and the science is well known, so I personally can’t understand why the government allows them in cities where people are living cheek by jowl and there is already enough pollution anyway. Just google “PH10” particles to see why they are a bad idea. I am not keen on cigarette smoke, and excessive amount cause me problems, but at least I can remove myself from its influence. The trouble with wood burners is that there is no escape, I came in last night after twenty minutes and my coat smelt like I had spent the evening in a smoky pub before smoking in pubs was banned. I am struggling to keep it out of my house. This is a problem that is getting worse. So, if anyone has any top tips on how to smoke proof my house please share them. Also, if anyone has any advice on if there are air purifiers be glad to hear it. Also, I think I remember years ago you could get, I think they were called “neurogena” or something that absorbed odours but I can’t find anything like that. I am hoping to “clean” the air, not just spray stuff around to mask it as I do not do well with air spray type products.

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  • The burning of wood could be less harmful than gas. A gas boiler burns oxygen from air much faster than a wood stove. The carbon dioxide emissions from gas appliances remain near or at ground level where people then inhale the stuff to their detriment. I would like to see everybody burning nothing.

  • Gas/electric used in my town for years and I have had no problem with anything outdoors affecting me. Now on most nights the air around my house is thick with smoke. Some wood smoke stats: Two hundred percent more of the very damaging PH10 particles in wood smoke as opposed to gas (even if you don't have asthma or another existing respiratory condition these are bad news - they are so small they bypass the bodies natural defences to settle deep in the lungs where they can cause some pretty nasty conditions. Should generate a few more customers for inhalers in years to come. PH10 are a marker for smoke pollution - there are others. The worst of it is if you are in the firing line (like I am since Nov when my neighbour got one of these devices) you receive a massive dose. Research sponsored by the Environment Protection Agency in the States showed that in a town with no industry to account for PH10 particles (i.e. the town was selected so that the primary cause would be domestic burning of wood) concentrations varied by 300%. That's a heck of a lot and I can well believe it. A short distance away from my house and there is not the same level of problem whereas in my garden I need to use a mask if I want to out. it's impossible to keep this smoke out of my house - windows are taped up, fan blocked up but still in wends its way in. 3 of my close blood relatives died of respiratory ailments and the way things are going I am likely to join them. I wonder if I can sue for personal injuries if my problems worsen? But I'd rather have my health than money.

    Think I read somewhere that the French have had the good sense to burn wood burning in Paris - anyone confirm if that's correct?

    Or better still - anyone who can recommend an air purifier - obviously one that doesn't rely on sucking air in from outside - I would be eternally grateful.

  • Gas/electric used in my town for years and I have had no problem with anything outdoors affecting me. Now on most nights the air around my house is thick with smoke. Some wood smoke stats: Two hundred percent more of the very damaging PH10 particles in wood smoke as opposed to gas (even if you don't have asthma or another existing respiratory condition these are bad news - they are so small they bypass the bodies natural defences to settle deep in the lungs where they can cause some pretty nasty conditions. Should generate a few more customers for inhalers in years to come. PH10 are a marker for smoke pollution - there are others. The worst of it is if you are in the firing line (like I am since Nov when my neighbour got one of these devices) you receive a massive dose. Research sponsored by the Environment Protection Agency in the States showed that in a town with no industry to account for PH10 particles (i.e. the town was selected so that the primary cause would be domestic burning of wood) concentrations varied by 300%. That's a heck of a lot and I can well believe it. A short distance away from my house and there is not the same level of problem whereas in my garden I need to use a mask if I want to out. it's impossible to keep this smoke out of my house - windows are taped up, fan blocked up but still in wends its way in. 3 of my close blood relatives died of respiratory ailments and the way things are going I am likely to join them. I wonder if I can sue for personal injuries if my problems worsen? But I'd rather have my health than money.

    Think I read somewhere that the French have had the good sense to burn wood burning in Paris - anyone confirm if that's correct?

    Or better still - anyone who can recommend an air purifier - obviously one that doesn't rely on sucking air in from outside - I would be eternally grateful.

    The only piece of equipment I know of that might help are oxygen concentrators. Some are made by a firm called DeVillbiss. However, I do not know if they are designed to deal with the smoke that bothers you. You could Google Oxygen concentrators and see what you think.

  • Thanks, Actually just been looking at air purifiers on the internet, quite liked the look of the ""De Longhi AC230"" - anyone found these to be of any help ? or got any recommendations ? And apologies if mentioning a particular manufacturer sounds like advertising and is inappropriate on the forum.

  • I've had an air purifier for several years now and I love it! I would suggest that you look at the size of the space you want to use it in and and then find a machine that siuts the space.

    I hope it helps.

  • We have a son with asthma and were considering purchasing a wood burning stove a few years ago but took some adivce from these chaps - ecostoveinstallations.co.uk. The gentlemen we spoke with advised us against it as he had suffered with respiratory symptoms himself as a result of many years working in the industry.

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