Allergy Could Go Away With Vitamin D

An allergy to common mould that often attacks patients with Cystic Fibrosis, or worsen asthma symptoms could be treated therapeutically with Vitamin D, claims a research study.

Dr. Jay Kolls, Professor and Chair of Genetics at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans, and colleagues wanted to identify the factors that determine why only some develop the allergy and what factors regulate tolerance or sensitisation to the mould resulting in the development of ABPA (Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis).

The environmental mould is one of the most prevalent fungal organisms inhaled by people. In asthmatics and in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF), it can cause significant allergic symptoms.

CF causes the body to produce thick, sticky mucus that clogs the lungs, leads to infection, and blocks the pancreas, which stops digestive enzymes from reaching the intestine where they are required in order to digest food.

Read more: Allergy Could Go Away With Vitamin D

medindia.net/news/Allergy-C...

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  • drcutler.com/general-health...

    The environmental mold, Aspergillus fumigatus, is one of the most prevalent fungal organisms inhaled by people. Researchers note that in the vast majority, it is not associated with disease. However, in asthmatics and in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF), it can cause significant allergic symptoms, including a severe allergic response called Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA).

    Researchers studied the cells that produce an allergic response in two groups of patients with CF and found that heightened allergic reactivity was linked to a lower average blood level of vitamin D.

    ""We found that adding vitamin D not only substantially reduced the production of the protein driving an allergic response, but it also increased production of the proteins that promote tolerance,"" said lead researcher Jay Kolls, M.D.

    Previous research has suggested that low levels of vitamin D may contribute to heart disease, a higher risk of diabetes, certain cancers, and depression as well as asthma, colds and other respiratory disorders.

  • Please note the title of this study. 'COULD make it go away', cos then again it might not.

    I know you mean well, Bob, but could I remind folks to check with your GP before adding Vitamin D to your daily diet.

  • 'Could' can be a great many things GrannyMo.

    You could go on a wonderful journey tomorrow which will change your life. Or you could choose to stay at home out of fear of going outside the front door because of all the nasty things you hear that 'could' happen.

    I personally don't like people in life who try to scare others into not investigating things - anything - least of all something that may possibly help them with a chronic illness.

    Just let people read the articles for themselves and make up their own minds.

  • Quite.

  • I am highly atopic with a high IgE, I'm allergic to several things including the mould mentioned here. I have been taking vitamin D since aged 7 (prescribed by a hospital dermatologist) and there has been no difference in my allergies.

    Could be a different story for someone else though.

  • I have ABPA and my consultant checks the level of vitamin D in my blood and if the levels are low will prescribe vitamin D. To date levels have been alright.... If you have ABPA you have to be careful as vitamin D levels can be increased naturally by spending 10-15 mins in the sun.... however if you are on antifungals spending time in the sun on these meds can cause your skin to react when in sunlight....

    Personally I would not add extra vitamin D to my diet unless advised by my consultant or GP.

  • The team who carried out this *in vitro* trial plan a further stage to see if they they get similar results by giving Vitamin D directly to trial subjects (in vitro=lab bench trial, vitamin D was added to cells collected from trial subjects, not administered directly to people) so hopefully this next stage will provide more robust, clinically useful information:

    ""We found that adding vitamin D not only substantially reduced the production of the protein driving an allergic response, but it also increased production of the proteins that promote tolerance,"" senior author Jay K. Kolls, MD, professor and chair of genetics at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans, said in a news release. ""Our study provides further evidence that vitamin D appears to be broadly associated with human health. The next step in our research is to conduct a clinical trial to see if vitamin D can be used to treat or prevent this complication of asthma and cystic fibrosis.""

    medscape.com/viewarticle/72... - (registration required for medscape, then access is free)

    full text of original article is available from the Journal of Clinical Investigation - jci.org/articles/view/42388

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