Spine curve

Hi

I went to the physio today for neck and shoulder strain. He told me after looking at my spine that it was more s shaped/curved/rotund than normal, but that was most likely because of my asthma (I was diagnosed 11 years ago when I was 10). Literally never ever heard of this happening before, was wondering if anyone can give me some more info/have experience of this?

Thanks,

Hannah

9 Replies

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  • I am quite interested in this as well as I have a curved spine and constant low back pain. I always thought mine was due to the old methods used in swimming training many years ago. So would be interesting to see if asthma was another factor in causing it.

  • Yes it is called scoliosis and i have had this for years, was diagnosed at 14, and have physio every fortnight with daily painkillers and exercises. You will need to have a x-ray to determined the degree of the curve and and depending how severe it is, you will need treatment, mine is 30 degrees and i just have physio, if it is more then 40 degrees and your still growing then you might need to wear a brace or surgery to straighten it, but you should see a specialist

  • I have a curved spine too, it was noticed as a child and I had a bit of physiotherapy for it. Have a lot of back pain and had an xray 2 years ago, and had another course of physiotherapy. My mum sees a chiropractioner regularly for her curved spine (collapsing due to Osteoporosis) and she thinks the treatment she has helps a lot.

  • I've been diagnosed with scoliosis too! Mine was due to a long dose of pred which basically weakened my bones. I have a 28 degree curve which they would normally brace but don't want to because of the restriction on breathing etc. At your age there unlikely to do anything as you've stopped growing except maybe physio

    Hope your OK

  • I don't have scoliosis but my GP has noted an exaggeration to the curve of my lumbar spine which kind of explains my frequent back pain and occasional leg pain/tingling/numbness from trapping the nerves.

    Just for clarity scoliosis describes an abnormal left/right curve in the spine, but (abnormally) curved spine can also be used to describe exaggeration of the normal front to back s-shape of the curve spine. If the upper spine is too curved it's called kyphosis and can lead to a ""humped back"" appearance and if the lower spine is too curved it's called lordosis.

  • due to long term pred use i have the start of scoliosis so they keeping a close eye on me for now, as i got kidney stones as well at the mo so that causing majority of pain so cant do much in way of exercising yet...

    x

  • Thanks

    Thanks guys for your replies, really helpful! Wish they would mention these things at check ups as could have started management sooner... Nimueh, I think what I have is the same as you, more of a hunch than a curve to one side (yay?!) Just wondered what treatment you have had to had if any for that?

    Hope you guys all stay well, thanks again.

    God Bless

    Hannah

  • Thanks

    Thanks guys for your replies, really helpful! Wish they would mention these things at check ups as could have started management sooner... Nimueh, I think what I have is the same as you, more of a hunch than a curve to one side (yay?!) Just wondered what treatment you have had to had if any for that?

    Hope you guys all stay well, thanks again.

    God Bless

    Hannah

  • Hi hannah,

    I'm a physio and asthma sufferer and also have developed a little ""hunch"" over the last few years due to asthma. When we have breathing problems certain muscles(eg.neck, breast and rib muscles) assist to help us extend our rib cage so that the lungs have more room to expand.

    Those muscles usually develope very well in us asthmatics and get very strong but can also shorten and therefore causing a ""hunch"" also our shoulders are more likely to stay upright and in a forward position as it's easier to breathe in that position.

    A lot of nerves around the ribs/back can get effected and could cause pain.

    It might take time but it can be treated very well in physiotherapy and certainly the nerve pains can easily be treated with the right exercises.

    A physio with craniosacral therapy experience is in my opinion the best choice when it comes to asthma as this kind of therapy focuses on the nerve structures and lungs and bronchi can be ""stretched"" gently. It feels like heaven having it done!

    Good luck and I hope you'll get sorted soon.

    Love Lydia x

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