Home Treatment

Hi folks

Just wanted to open up a thought to discussion.

How would people feel to been treated at home? To have medical people come out to them?

As asthmatics we often face a lot of triggers and sometimes our own homes are safer enviroments.

What do people think? Is it something we should be suggesting?

I know for some of us we get this anyway but should it be more common?

Should it be a standard thing for asthma? Home treatment?

Just wondered what peoples thoughts were?


7 Replies

  • Sounds silly bit my house is my safe haven. Not keen for care at home.when unwel hospital can do all the nasty stuff as I know I'll get peace at home. Suppose I'm lucky my length of stay in hospital is 1-3 days .... So

  • I think it needs an individual response - in some cases this would be ideal, in others not. I have major triggers where I live that I can't do anything about so home treatment could be counter-productive. For others, stressors in their home environment may exaggerate their condition and the break in environment may actually help.

    However, saying that, there is a lot to be said for maintaining the familiar and being somewhere you are comfortable with your own things around you. I certainly resist hospital as far as safely possible because the stress of going in can make my asthma worse - so I have to balance that against home triggers. I guess it's a case of 'it's complicated'!

  • i get treatment at home from the arras team when ive come out of hospital for as long as im ill or i can go to see them at my local hosp if i need to....being treated at home is a good idea but cant see it being very cost effective for the nhs. i have loads of different triggers-some perfumes being one trigger and going into hospitals where the docs n nurses are covered in aftershave and strong perfumes a bummer for me as is the cleaners they use.having said that ive had loads of attacks that have started when im just sitting at home in bed (my bedroom has no carpets now cos of my asthma and very little soft furnishing and i clean lots with no chemicals cos of ocd lol so no apparent triggers here)so maybe being at home isnt that good for me lol

  • Hi Folks, I don't think this would work, at least it wouldn't have worked in my daughter's case as she required frequent venting in I.C.U. As we all react differently when we have an attack I don't think being cared for on the community is feasible. Who would give this care? The community nursing service is stretched to it's limit at the moment. Would they be able to give a specific time. At the moment they don't. What equipment would they need and who would take responsibility for it. I'm a bit like Gussypoo I don't think I'd like my home to be used for anything other than my escape from medics etc. Keep well everyone. LIZ x

  • Hmmm, would be good not to have to stay in hospital but not very safe and a bit impractical. For instance how would you have a chest x-ray? My last admission was a bit scary because I had stayed at home too long. By the time i got to A&E i was pale, hypoxic my resps were 44 and it took longer to get me stable. I was very glad of the care of the critical outreach team that came to recuss, the critical care that is needed in the event of a severe asthma attack could not be given easily in the community. I guess once your stable it would be good to stay at home but that said it always takes me a while to recover and for me to safely be allowed home.

    I think the current system of being given support at home is okay but i think it would be dangerous to stay at home if your asthma is severe. I don't like being in hospital but that said i would rather be where i can quickly be intubated and stabilised and within a bleep's distance of critical care than at best 8 minutes but nearer to 15 in the community. No on balance i would definately not want to just be treated at home, too risky. Take care everyone, Lois

  • home treatment

    Not feasible for me as asthma is to erractic and severe and need hospital interventions. They have the training and equipement to handle brittle asthama. My home is my haven from too many frequent hospitalisations so wouldn't want them to invade it.


  • I manage my asthma as far as I can at home which entails all my regular meds, nebs, starting my s/c ventolin infusion, altering my steroid dose, Oxygen use.

    Therefore if this lot isn't working, I need to be in hospital.

    Care in the community wouldn't work for me.

    I understand that there will be more care at home for COPD patients to help stop them having admissions.

    For asthmatics, it should be prevention and monitoring by GPs, Asthma nurses and consultants with a good asthma protocol.

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