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Chest infection from spraying Flea Spray (or was it just bad luck, flu season or allergy?)

health8ay34i profile image
24 Replies

Has anyone sprayed anything similar like flea spray (Indorex) and may not have ventilated the house very well, leading to breathing issues?

I developed a chest infection soon after spraying the house with flea spray but my partner and cat had no issues. I thought maybe it was the change in the weather and flu season has arrived - I checked for covid, tests were all negative.

I was given a course of antibiotics as sputum was bright green and was given a blue inhaler (reliever) and brown inhaler (steroids) and x-Ray came back clear.

I guess my main question is: Has anyone been through the same experience as myself as I’d like to hear about it and whether recovery was a positive one? I did some Googling but could only find one post on Mumsnet where someone had wheezing for 6months after using Indorex - I replied to them but no answer. I wanted to know whether they got over it as I’m feeling this journey has been going on for quite a while for me (3months!)

TIA

24 Replies
hypercat54 profile image
hypercat54

I have used this before to kill fleas and didn't suffer from any issues. Mind you it's best to leave for a while which I presume you did? However different things are triggers for some but for not others, so maybe it did?

I will say though that Indorex is also brilliant at killing spiders which is what I also used it for!

health8ay34i profile image
health8ay34i in reply to hypercat54

I don’t think I ventilated the house well enough as it was on the day when we had a 35 degrees heatwave and no wind! My partner and cat weren’t affected thankfully - my partner is asthmatic whereas I’m not! Maybe it was a chest infection I picked up and not at all related to the flea spray. I’ve not had a chest infection and recovery seems to be taking a while (unless 3 months+ is normal?)

Blackbird9 profile image
Blackbird9

I have COPD stage 4 .. im also a dog walker and spray my van with Indorex once a week when we are doing the big clean through just as a precautionary measure ...

I haven't had any problems using it though i wear a mask and vans parked outside not in a garage 🧡

health8ay34i profile image
health8ay34i in reply to Blackbird9

I did not wear a mask but I will in the future. I’m just concerned that the aftermath of the chest infection is still not clearing up - I’ve not had a chest infection before though and maybe 3-6months might be normal recovery time (I’ve hopped on here to hear others experiences with recovery). I was checked for asthma, allergies and even had an x Ray but nothing that is a concern. Maybe this whole ordeal was just a nasty chest infection that may not have been related to the flea spray at all!

Cloudancer profile image
Cloudancer

So sorry to hear that you have been unwell.

I cant help re use of this particular product --as a severe asthmatic all sprays etc aren't used in our home.May I suggest if you are still symptomatic after this length of time you contact your local gp practice?

Let us know how you get on.

health8ay34i profile image
health8ay34i in reply to Cloudancer

I sprayed it back in August! It’s hard to tell whether it was the flea treatment or a nasty chest infection in general - never had one before so have no idea if I’m being a hypochondriac. 3-6 months for recovery is what I’m hearing on the net…

Fircone profile image
Fircone

Its important to remember that spraying with any product will put particulates into the air and some will settle but others can remain airborne for a lot longer. If you really need to spray anything do wear a mask and leave the room for as long as possible.

health8ay34i profile image
health8ay34i in reply to Fircone

do you mean settle into surfaces and then still inhaling them? Or do you mean touching the surfaces can affect breathing?

Fircone profile image
Fircone in reply to health8ay34i

I mean that any remaining spray in the atmosphere of the room can still be inhaled while you’re in the room. I don’t know if once they’ve settled on surfaces you can still inhale them, I shouldn’t think so unless they offgas such as bleach spray and other cleaning sprays and ofcourse perfumes and deodorant sprays can affect breathing.

peege profile image
peege

Hi, I think the only connection could be that the spray affected your airways, closing them a bit - or a lot in lung compromised people like many members here. Most of us avoid chemicals and other irritants. Closing or inflammation of airways can prevent the natural explusion of mucus from the lungs so if there's any stuck down there it becomes an ideal warm, wet environment for bacteria to grow. If you're a bit low, stressed, very tired or immune system is low an infection can set in. That's all I can think of. P ×

health8ay34i profile image
health8ay34i in reply to peege

thanks for your reply, I’m currently taking steroids via an inhaler (modulite). One doc thought 4 puffs a day sounded excessive and suggested just 2 puffs in the evenings instead. At the moment, the shortness of breath has lessened however feeling a very dry throat still - not sore and not coughing!

Cloudancer profile image
Cloudancer in reply to health8ay34i

Please be vigilante about rinsing out your mouth following inhalers /nebulisers etc .

Having had episodes of thrush and now gum disease from all the meds I do regret the times I forgot as life caught up with me and I powered out the door superwomen incarnate on a mission to cram as much into a day that was clearly impossible!

health8ay34i profile image
health8ay34i in reply to Cloudancer

thank you for the reminder! I’ve been washing mine and the spacer at the end of each week! I’m very much a clean freak x

health8ay34i profile image
health8ay34i in reply to Cloudancer

oh I misread! You wash your mouth out too after inhaling?

peege profile image
peege in reply to health8ay34i

Yes, many many members do. Just for good measure I wet my mouth and throat before inhaling too , I’ve convinced myself that by doing that I dilute the medication on my mouth/throat. A bit ocd probably but I only want the medication to go to my airways not through the oral soft tissues, then I'll thoroughly rinse and gargle afterwards.

I once went to the GP complaining of sore throat on waking every day, I thought it was thrush. He said there was nothing there so I was quite miffed with him. It went on for weeks then one day my kids got together to inform me I snored loudly all night 😱

health8ay34i profile image
health8ay34i in reply to peege

My partner hasn’t noticed snoring or mouth wide open when I’m asleep, I may record myself and see in case he’s a deep sleeper haha. Did you do anything for your snoring?

peege profile image
peege in reply to health8ay34i

I wasn't suggesting that you snore 🤣, i think your partner would have let you know. Nah, I think mine's due to nasal polyps, rubbish sinuses and narrow nasal tubes. Its not fair, I always sleep with my mouth clamped shut too 😭

Metal-legs profile image
Metal-legs in reply to Cloudancer

Yes I have always rinsed my mouth out thoroughly after nebulising twice a day then swilled my mouth with coconut oil to help prevent thrush and gum problems.

Cloudancer profile image
Cloudancer

Yes I do to get rid of any particles left in mouth.

Not sure what others do -that advice was given to me years ago cos some inhalers may interfere with the natural flora of a healthy mouth x

Solily profile image
Solily

I have asthma and COPD... sprayed a natural flea spray made of essential oils and had a terrible reaction. Coughing, short of breath etc. so then I bought a flea spray that was not considered "natural" and had a reaction! But I also have the same issues with household cleaners .... so I only clean with vinegar and water mix.

health8ay34i profile image
health8ay34i in reply to Solily

I’m definitely going to be extra careful if I ever need to use this product again… if it really is the flea spray that has affected me for this amount of time, am not pleased about it :(

O2Trees profile image
O2Trees

YES !!!!! I attribute some at least of my lung problems to flea powder. We adopted a stray cat when I was about 24, riddled with fleas and they all made their home in the rush matting we had. We sprayed, had the council round, but they were still there, leaping onto my bare legs after a bath. So when that happened I freaked and covered the bed in flea powder - and it was DDT back in the day. In the morning I woke with shocking sore throat and difficulty breathing. I was coughing and had a lot of pain. The GP came, diagnosed bronchitis and prescribed an inhaler but even then I didnt make the connection so didnt mention the flea spray to her. It's only in more recent years Ive thought - 'aha!'

So started my asthma. Never had it before though I had quite heavy hay fever. I was not a heavy smoker, 10 a day for 20 years and of course I know that's enough to cause copd in susceptible individuals. But Im now sure the flea spray must have damaged my lungs.

Please take care with all chemicals health8ay34i. And yes, I always rinse my mouth several times after using my now much stronger inhalers. I hope your situation resolves. Take care :)

health8ay34i profile image
health8ay34i in reply to O2Trees

sorry for delay in reply! Just my luck, I have just caught covid. Interesting to hear you’ve had a similar experience - I have tests for asthma like spirometry and results are normal. I’m not a smoker at all so the docs weren’t overly concerned. I now have have covid so it’s currently masking whatever issue I’ve been dealing with from the flea spray - how long did it take you to recover from the flea powder?

O2Trees profile image
O2Trees in reply to health8ay34i

I cant remember, it was 50 years ago - probably the kind of time a young person takes to get over a bout of bronchitis, ten days perhaps. We didnt mention the flea powder to the doctor as we didnt make the connection back then. But if Im right, the damage has had a life long effect. The on-off asthma it left me with was never like most people's who had it. Never any sudden attacks but predictable allergic responses to grass pollen, and increasingly over time asthmatic responses to bacterial infections which continue to this day.

I have wondered if there was an element of copd there from the time of the exposure. I was dxd with copd in 2000 and had some reversibility then. I was seen as having both - overlap syndrome, though that name came later.

So sorry to hear you have covid. Go easy and look after yourself - hope it resolves asap. All best :)

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