Coronavirus guidance: We are aware that... - AF Association

AF Association
19,728 members24,117 posts

Coronavirus guidance

Charleneadmin
CharleneadminAdministrator

We are aware that people with AF and other arrhythmias are understandably concerned about Coronavirus (COVID 19).

We understand that having AF or any arrhythmia does not put you in a higher risk category, or at an increased risk of contracting Coronavirus. However if you do contract the disease and have cardiovascular issues, diabetes or a lung condition or other chronic health issues, the symptoms may affect you more and may be more dangerous.

To prevent the spread of this illness or other illnesses, including the flu:

•Wash your hands often with soap and water, (recommended every two hours for a minimum of 20 seconds – some say sing ‘Happy Birthday’ twice so you know you have washed them long enough)

•It has also been advised to clean your mobile phone every time your wash your hands

•Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze (advice is to cough into your arm rather than your hand to reduce risk of spreading any germs

•Call 111 if you think you may have symptoms for advice and guidance

•Visit nhs.uk/conditions/coronavir... for more information on the Coronavirus, including what you should know about symptoms, treatments, testing, and other frequently asked questions.

22 Replies
oldestnewest

Thank you Charlene for taking the time to post this - any advice and reassurance is most welcome.💕

Hidden
Hidden

Thankyou! Any advice on what to clean phone with that doesnt harm coating on glass?

NannyJo
NannyJo
in reply to Hidden

Spot of washing up liquid on a piece of damp kitchen roll, then use a dry sheet to wipe it.

Thanks for this Charlene. Good to know that Arrhythmia not classified within higher risk categories.

Thanks for this post and explanation. However, I don't believe that this answers the fundamental question. Yes, if you have AFIB or other heart condition for that matter, you are no more or less likely to catch the CV. However, my question is as follows: once you have caught CV, are you (with AFIB) more likely to have a serious reaction than someone without a pre-existing condition. The guidance indicated that if you have a heart or other pre-existing condition, you potentially could have a more serious reaction if you catch CV. I'm trying to figure out whether Lone AFIB falls into the pre-existing condition criteria such as cardiovascular disease?

Beta44
Beta44
in reply to Jhcoop55

I think that a high fever could start off AF and then the heart is compromised at only partial efficiency. Given the high demands on the heart if pneumonia develops heart failure would be possible. Obviously the same for those in permanent AF. So in short we are vulnerable and should avoid getting infected.

Peter

RajaRua
RajaRua
in reply to Beta44

Thank you Peter that is very helpful.

Bob56
Bob56
in reply to Jhcoop55

I suspect that many people with AF will have other medical conditions such as high blood pressure, and others will have developed AF having already had a stroke, heart attack etc. And, depending on your definition, the majority will be older people. I believe that Paroxysmal or Lone AF without any of these associated issues would not necessarily place you in the vulnerable category, but the combination with other conditions almost certainly would. It would be helpful to get an expert view but we are still in uncharted waters so we might be waiting a while to get a definitive judgement on this question.

Buffafly
Buffafly
in reply to Bob56

Valve problems would affect the function of the heart under stress. I'm very nervous about catching it (asthma, lung scarring, leaky mitral valve, PAF with RVR) but really it is out of my hands - literally - so I'm just trying to look after my general health.

Jonathan_C
Jonathan_C
in reply to Buffafly

Its not out of your hands, its in your hands (literally) ... in washing them and using your clean hands to take supplements like vitamin C so that you do not catch the virus. ...and remaining calm (most importantly; you sound calm so stay that way).

BobD
BobDVolunteer
in reply to Jhcoop55

Afib is an electrical problem not coronary artery disease.

Jhcoop55
Jhcoop55
in reply to BobD

Yes, I am well aware (unfortunately) that AFIB is an electrical condition ☹️. However, the guidance coming out does not seem to focus only on cardiovascular disease but also refers to any heart condition. Doesn't AFIB qualify as a heart condition? Hypothetically, if a patient was dealing with CoronaVirus whose virus related symptoms then initiated an AFIB event, couldn't that be a bad thing in trying to fight the virus or leave you even more compromised?

Can't seem to get a response from my EP

Shcldavies
Shcldavies
in reply to Jhcoop55

Reading the carefully prepared statement the only conclusion anyone can come to is that as any arrhythmia is classed as a cardiovascular condition hence using the words in the statement above, if you have any arrhythmia and contract COVID-19 then the symptoms may affect you more and it may be more dangerous.

farmerwalt
farmerwalt
in reply to BobD

Hi Bob,

Long time since I was on HU. Hope you are well.

My problem is that the AF has caused DCM and resultant CHF. Also got a bit of COPD. All that coupled with 77 at end of April, so I just aim to keep out of the way. Fortunately living on the farm that is two miles from the town makes that a bit easier, apart from shopping.

All the reported deaths, so far, they just say they had underlying medical conditions, but don't bother to say what they were. I suppose that might be to stop folks panicing.

Walter.

Charleneadmin
CharleneadminAdministrator

Dear all,

Thank you for your comments and questions.

The advice that I have posted above was written by a group of medical professionals in our medical advisory committee and comes directly from them as the most up to date medical advice.

For any further questions or concerns you have about your personal risk of coronavirus based on your own set of circumstance and medical history, please contact your doctor, specialist or NHS 111.

Best wishes,

Charlene

Af is the only thing I "have" and it's reasonably stable... however heavy colds I've had this winter have had a tendency to give me palpitations and a higher heart rate without full blown AF (though that has happened).

So I just need to be mindful to rest more (lol) and drink more when something cold/flu/corona like hits.

If everyone is buying up soap and washing their hands as much as the panic buying suggests we should all be fine.

A thought just occurred to me... (they occasionally do).

If this virus can live on plastic for up to three weeks - most of our money is now in plastic notes form.

I am the exact same as you and viral infections or colds give me a high heart rate and palpitations.

The last viral infection I had put me in resus with a heart rate of 240bpm.

I am showing symptoms of COVID19 started with a sore throat then Cough and high temp. I have had 2 palpitations luckily calmed them down on my own and I am already on 2.5mg Bisoprolol.

I’m on day 4 tomorrow and starting to feel a bit better.

Hope this helps

Thanks Charlene, very helpful.....

Any arrhythmia is classed as a cardiovascular condition hence using the words in the statement above, if you have any arrhythmia and contract COVID-19 then the symptoms may affect you more and it may be more dangerous. Should then there be additional measures for all of us with an arrhythmia condition.

How do medications like apixaban effect your immune system as thrombin is part of the reaction to pulmonary viruses and anticoagulants suppress this

I have Lone PAF. I am being precautious and following the Governments advice by self isolated from work by working. The guidance is open to interpretation, however, I qualify for an annual flu jab and I certainly know that when I have a virus it really impacts on my heart rhythm.

There I do not believe it puts me at a higher risk of contracting CoVid19 but could put me in the hospital with AFrib. The guidance is to ensure people with underlying conditions protect themselves from going in to hospital and NHS staff being diverted from saving life’s.

Stay safe everyone!

You may also like...