Irratic heart rate resting: Can anyone help I... - AF Association

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Irratic heart rate resting

Billblue
Billblue

Can anyone help I have had permanent atrial Fibrillation for 3 years take bisoprolol 2.5 digoxin 125 and rivaroxaban always had heart rate of about 70 to 75 bpm but lately it all of a sudden rises to 125 bpm then drops back to 80/90 then later drops back to 70/75 bpm this always whilst resting hope this makes sense thank you .....

16 Replies
oldestnewest
Hidden
Hidden

Hard to say whats going on without an ekg but with fluctuating high heart rates up to 125 at rest, sounds like your heart is complaining about something. Be good idea to let your heart doc know

Billblue
Billblue
in reply to Hidden

Thanks for your reply just reading some dirt posts may be related as I have been on a strict diet over the last few months

Billblue
Billblue
in reply to Hidden

Should have been diet not dirt .......

Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Billblue

I thought that sounded odd😂

Bagrat
Bagrat
in reply to Billblue

If you click the more arrow at bottom of post you can edit your post but we enjoy a good typo!!

Billblue
Billblue
in reply to Bagrat

I want information not advice on minor details

Tapanac
Tapanac
in reply to Billblue

Eee I’m sure bagrat was just trying to help

go back to docs and get checked out I'm waiting at the mo to go for an angiogram because they are now thinking I have angina which may have set my atrial fibrillation of in the first place you may just need your dose changing but it definitely needs getting checked out

Billblue
Billblue
in reply to homlyme

Thanks good advice will do

Hidden
Hidden

I am pretty convinced your diet has a lot to do with your afib. Here is what I found for myself over the years:

---------------------------------

After 9 years of trying different foods and logging EVERYTHING I ate, I found sugar (and to a lesser degree, salt – i.e. dehydration) was triggering my Afib. Doctors don't want to hear this - there is no money in telling patients to eat less sugar. Each person has a different sugar threshold - and it changes as you get older, so you need to count every gram of sugar you eat every day (including natural sugars in fruits, etc.). My tolerance level was 190 grams of sugar per day 8 years ago, 85 grams a year and a half ago, and 60 grams today, so AFIB episodes are more frequent and last longer (this is why all doctors agree that afib gets worse as you get older). If you keep your intake of sugar below your threshold level your AFIB will not happen again (easier said than done of course). It's not the food - it's the sugar (or salt - see below) IN the food that's causing your problems. Try it and you will see - should only take you 1 or 2 months of trial-and-error to find your threshold level. And for the record - ALL sugars are treated the same (honey, refined, agave, natural sugars in fruits, etc.). I successfully triggered AFIB by eating a bunch of plums and peaches one day just to test it out. In addition, I have noticed that moderate (afternoon) exercise (7-mile bike ride or 5-mile hike in the park) often puts my Afib heart back in to normal rhythm a couple hours later. Don’t know why – perhaps you burn off the excess sugars in your blood/muscles or sweat out excess salt?? I also found that strenuous exercise does no good – perhaps you make yourself dehydrated??

I'm pretty sure that Afib is caused by a gland(s) - like the Pancreas - or an organ that, in our old age, is not working well anymore and excess sugar or dehydration is causing them to send mixed signals to the heart - for example telling the heart to beat fast and slow at the same time - which causes it to skip beats, etc. I can't prove that (and neither can my doctors), but I have a very strong suspicion that that is the root cause of our Afib problems. I am working on this with a Nutritionist and hope to get some definitive proof in a few months.

Also, in addition to sugar, if you are dehydrated - this will trigger AFIB as well. It seems (but I have no proof of this) that a little uptick of salt in your blood is being treated the same as an uptick of sugar - both cause AFIB episodes. (I’m not a doctor – it may be the sugar in your muscles/organs and not in your blood, don’t know). In any case you have to keep hydrated, and not eat too much salt. The root problem is that our bodies are not processing sugar/salt properly and no doctor knows why, but the AFIB seems to be a symptom of this and not the primary problem, but medicine is not advanced enough to know the core reason that causes AFIB at this time. You can have a healthy heart and still have Afib – something inside us is triggering it when we eat too much sugar or get (even a little) dehydrated. Find out the core reason for this and you will be a millionaire and make the cover of Time Magazine! Good luck! - Rick Hyer

PS – there is a study backing up this data you can view at:

https//cardiab.biomedcentral.com/a...

Mari4325
Mari4325
in reply to Hidden

I will try this. I have known for a long time salt aggravates my afib but I had not thought of sugar. I can certainly cut out a lot of the honey and other things I normally digest. The link to the article does not work for me and I would really like to read it... could you post it again.

Thanks

Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Mari4325

The link works for me - I cut-and-paste it into the URL field. Give that a try. Plus I'm in the U.S. - perhaps you are somewhere else in the world where you need to add something to the URl. Here it is again:

https//cardiab.biomedcentral.com/a...

- Rick Hyer.

Billblue
Billblue
in reply to Hidden

Your advice seems right to me I have been eating quite a lot of fruit and cut out sweetness in tea and cereals and use sugar thanks for your comments will put into practice now

Camelia23
Camelia23
in reply to Hidden

I enjoyed reading all this. I keep to a low salt diet but now and again eat dark chocolate or chocolate biscuit. My mother and brother had type 2 diabetes in their late 60s. My brother has controlled his by diet. He was not overweight but pancreas was less efficient. I'm 75 and your post has made me reconsider the chocolate. Thanks

Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Camelia23

You might have hit the nail on the head with the "less efficient" pancreas. My Nutritionist spends more time around my pancreas than any other place and it seems it's the pancreas that is the problem, but not sure. So far she had increased the "efficiency" of my pancreas (and Thyroid) to the point I can now eat 76 grams of sugar a day (up from 48) before my afib kicks in. If we can get that up to 100 grams a day, I should be able to be afib free - as long as I eat less than 100 grams of sugar a day, and that is much easier to do than trying to eat less than 48 grams (which is nearly impossible and I was in afib 5-6 days a week back then). Anyway - let me know if the reduced sugar works for you, and if your tolerance level is less than 60 grams a day, see a Nutrition Response Tester - perhaps she/he can get your tolerance level up to a workable level.

- Rick Hyer.

Just had holter results. My heart rate changes all the time between 128 and 66 average 90.

Cardiologist says this average is about 10 points too high but range is nothing to worry about.

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