Permanent AF: Hello, It looks like my AF is... - AF Association

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Permanent AF

doramar38
doramar38
15 Replies

Hello, It looks like my AF is now in permanent mode. I've had it for 3 days nonstop. I would like to know what activity I should avoid. It can be quite strong at times, leaving me breathless. Can I carry on doing housework, bed changing etc, I don't want to vegetate. As I said in an earlier post, I'm being referred to an EP for an ablation, but that could be a while off. Any advice would be much appreciated.

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I think you should give your surgery a ring and explain what is happening now that you are in continuous AF and breathless. Do you know what your heart rate Is? Has an electrical cardioversion been mentioned to you ?

In the meantime I would just do as much around the house as you can manage.

Sandra

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BobD
BobDVolunteer

First things first. It is not permanent until it has been proved as such For example if drugs and cardioversion are unable to return you to NSR then it may be so considered. After seven days it may be thought persistent if CV can restore normal rhythm.

As far as what can you do. what can you do? I once drove to Wales, changed an engine in a rally car and drove home again (from Devon) all whilst in AF because I had to! I would say listen to your body and go with the flow. We are all different and some people can't move and need hospital treatment whilst some can carry on some semblance of normal life at a reduced pace. I never let AF rule my life so go for it if you want to. Stay well hydrated especially this warm weather and if it slows you down then slow down. (Obviously any chest pain is bad and should be checked out.)

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doramar38
doramar38
in reply to BobD

Thanks, Bob. I just thought AF was regarded as permanent when it's continuous. As for cardioversion, I believe a general anaesthetic is required for that and having asthma, I'm not a good risk for it. I don't want AF to rule my life, either, so I'll do all I can to live it normally.

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BobD
BobDVolunteer
in reply to doramar38

Injection in your arm two minutes zero problem. Had loads.

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R1100S1
R1100S1
in reply to doramar38

Asthma and Bronchiectasis sufferer. No problem during or after the CV with chest unfortunately went back into AF and now for several years in permanent

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Buffafly

Take it slow and if you feel unwell have a break! With or without a Kit Kat (other naughty snacks are available)......

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jeanjeannie50

Having suffered with attacks of fast AF that went on for months. I found that by taking things slowly, I could just about do everything.

Mowing the lawns would quite upset me as it made me so tired, I struggled with that and did it full of self pity. It would make my heart sore too (still does), I would do a bit and have a longish rest and then so on until I'd done the lot, only one lawn on one day mind. I still do it that way now (am in permanent AF , but pulse under 100 when resting). I have lots of friends and family, but I don't think they realised just how hard it was for me. Mind you I like things to be fairly neat, so when the lawns needed doing I did them right away. There was no way I was going to let them go without a weekly cut. Just couldn't bear to look out of the window at them.

I agree with Buffafly and I would stock up on energy giving goodies. In this hot weather choc ices are nice.

I would arrange to see your GP and ask him what he suggests. As Yatsura has said you may well benefit from a cardioversion. It may sound strange but I quite like having them. You go into hospital feeling shattered with the effect of AF and come out cured.

Please let us know how you get on.

Jean

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doramar38

Hi, Jean. Thanks for your comments. Energy snacks are a no no for, me I'm diabetic and on a weight loss regime.

I can just about carry on housework but it leaves me tired & breathless. But I'll take my time & rest in between.

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smn100

If you do a bit and sit a bit you should be able to do most things!! I struggle with hills but I can do them if I take my time. Been in permanent AF since age 40 8 years ago. Don't let it beat you

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netie54

That’s a long time in be in permanent AF. It could be doing damage. You should go to A and E. Maybe they will be a conversion for you.

Best I think . Good luck.

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Ianc2

Hi doramar

Welcome to the 'change you lifestyle club'. If you are on a weight loss program to get rid of diabetes you have taken a major step forward. I don't know if you saw a couple of programs on ITV which got a small group of volunteers (with type 2) together.

They scanned their livers and showed them how fatty their livers were, and then put them on calorie controlled diets using a variety of methods in episode 1.

They then reported back in episode 2. with some very impressive results. One young man in particular lost weight very quickly and moved out of diabetes completely. His scans came back clear.

Another woman was a chef who was surrounded by food and was much more challenged - for her they came up with a six hour eating period from mid day to 6pm. Her progress wasn't so quick but she was making progress.

I have permanent afib. I get my chloresterol and sugar levels checked regularly, they are ok, but my blood pressure isn't. So I am working on getting my weight down to somewhere near the mid point of my BMI, and regularly go walking for about 6 /7miles. I am 73.

The afib started when I was about 55. I developed Mitral valve problems (lack of exercise, sitting down job with a fair amount of stress, , red wine on demand, coffee on tap, overweight). So lots of pills including amiodarone, etc. So open heart surgery, cardioversion, followed by an ablation in 2014, which resulted in much reduced afib and a much healthier lifestyle. My weight is coming down and my blood pressure with it

The wine has gone, the coffee much restricted decaff, and I have just come back from a walking holiday in Austria - chairlifts are wonderful things.

So be of good heart. Imagine all the bags of sugar you will no longer carry around. Your knees will thank you for it, and one day you may find you can open your bin and throw most of your pills in it.

Ian

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doramar38
doramar38
in reply to Ianc2

Hi, Ian, Yes I saw that programme. My cardiologist suggested, strongly, that I crash diet. A sandwich at lunch and a ready meal for dinner, he said. He agreed it was very hard to do but felt I should go for it. When I queried about the excess flab after the weight loss, he shrugged and said I'd have to pay for its removal, not done on the NHS, or carry it around! I could never pay such an expense, so I'd continue to lug it around! There are no gyms in my area (rural) and also having a severe balance disorder, I couldn't work out at home. Bit difficult, too, at nearly 80 years old & arthritic. But, I'm trying it and my sugar levels are near normal already and I can cut down my insulin dosage, so that's good in itself. Thanks for your comments.

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Mugster

I was in continuous Af for 18 months. My only real symptom was tiredness. So I just stopped and sat down when tired

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Flaka

Doesn’t necessarily mean you are in permanent A Fib. I have been in continual A Fib before for 3 days then finally after some deep breathing I finally went back into Normal sinus rhythm and was for 4 days then stressful situation happened and went into a fib again. Happens a lot so think I am going to start yoga class again as that seemed to keep me in NSR.

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