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Correction to my post "A word about cinnamon'

Hi all. Earlier today I wrote a post about cinnamon and how I had problems with an elevated INR from eating too much cinnamon. I don't know where my mind was (probably wrapped in brain fog) but I mistakenly wrote the word curcumin everywhere I meant to write coumarin. Please make this substitution when reading the post. Meanwhile I will continue looking for my post and edit out the word curcumin and substitute (correctly) the word coumarin. Please forgive error. Thank you all. irina1975

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Update, Found post and just corrected it. It now says cinnamon is high in 'COUMARIN' not corcumin. Thanks, irina

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Consider yourself forgiven.....😉

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How much is too much cinnamon? Was it a supplement or spice in cooking?

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I use the spice but, for instance, I DROWN oatmeal with cinnamon. The little cinnamon rolls were from a bakery and were very cinnamon-y. I got carried away and ate too many!!!! There are other similar spices that can affect the blood, ie turmeric. I love Indian food and usually grind my own curry spice mix. It also has a lot of cinnamon plus garlic, cloves, turmeric, ginger, cardamom,red and black pepper,etc. It would be interesting to know if Indians had less strokes because of all their different 'curry' spices and other spicy sauces.

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Sorry but can't even find that post either on the main list of on your own area.

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Just to put you out of your misery, it was in a reply Irina made to a post from Vonnieruth about Apixaban 2 days ago

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Thanks .😊

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Her question was "Are there any foods or drinks to avoid while on apixaban? I typed in apixaban and her question showed up about 4th-5th, I think.

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*%##+% predictive text 😣

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This is very interesting. Some types of cinnamon have significant amounts of coumarins (similar to warfarin). For instance Ceylon cinnamon has a lower coumarin content than cassia cinnamon, which has up to 63 times more, according to ScienceDaily.com. But you can't tell what type of cinnamon you have.

This affects NOAC users as well as warfarin users. For instance dabigatran has a significant interaction with cinnamon, see rxlist.com/drug-interaction...

I don't think small quantities used in cooking would have an impact. For instance I use a pinch in a very nice venison casserole I do. But if taking a larger quantity (such as a strongly cinnamon flavoured food), I would increase INR checks if on warfarin and avoid if on an NOAC.

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I agree and that's what I did. It helped me realize there was quite a significant raise.

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