AF Association
13,596 members16,481 posts

Heart stops frequently !!!

Hi there, I have been living with Atrial fibullation for many years now where my heart rate races after missing a beat, I was prescribed bisoprolol 2.5mg, they seemed to be helping to regulate my heart rate to a normal pace, however since before Christmas I noticed my heart slowing down to the point of stopping, so I saw my GP who advised me to stop taking them which I did posthaste, however just last weekend I was admitted to Cardiology after experiencing several neer blackouts where I felt my heart slow too a brief pause, I was admitted to a ward and monitored for two days,,I stabilised at around 60-65 bpm results of my blood tests showed potassium and magnesium deficiency, I eat a good diet and try to do 50 push-ups a day, and drink at least 2ltr water per day, I am now thinking I might have stopped taking the bisoprolol to quickly my pharmacy said I should have stopped taking them gradually , anyway I thought I was ok but today I have been experiencing more slow heart beats to the point of blacking out, so I guess it's back to hospital for more tests.it really is scary.

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Yes, definitely scary and definitely needs further investigation. What was recommended for the lack of magnesium and potassium. Please keep us posted.

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Nothing was mentioned to me before leaving the ward, they did give me some soluble tablets to boost my levels while I was there but after they stabilised me that was it, I will follow up with my own doctor to see if he is gonna prescribe somethings , meantime I will try some dioralyte rehydration salts to see if that helps,

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Robbie

Serum mag level pretty useless. Red cell mag better

Self medicating with electrolytes for AF could be unwise

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Yes u are absolutely correct when it comes to self medicatiing, however i thought as they were haveing serous problems trying to get a line into me i assumed i was seriously dehydrated hence the choice of dioralyte, insidently it did work somewhat, i will of course be seeking my dr’s advice, thank you for your input

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Watch Sanjay Guptas video on Magnesium. I take supplements every day now and am so much better. Magnesium is depleted in food due to food processing, pesticides in the ground etc. You will be amazed at what Magnesium does for the body.

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ickle

Better in what way

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This is sick sinus syndrome with complete heart block and AF until proved otherwise

I imagine necessary investigations like Holter are underway.

Every time you black out or collapse ring 999 unless Cardio say otherwise,

Read up about above and Stokes Adams attacks

Contact arrhythmia nurse pronto

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I haven't heard of sick sinus syndrome before, I'll try and find out more about that on line,cheers

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Robbie we are not medics and cannot or should not diagnose people on this site. If you had SSS a holter ECG would easily pick this up - as would monitoring in a cardiac ward.

SSS is when the sinus node - from which all the electrical impulses in the heart originate, basically goes haywire. Heart pauses for more than 5 seconds can cause symptoms. Easily controlled with a insertion of a pacemaker. Often happens in older age and certainly symptoms can be, but aren’t always - dizziness and momentary feeling of blacking out - but so can lots of other conditions make you feel like that.

If you are still concerned and suffer symptoms then I would return to your GP and ask for a holter test,

It can be dangerous to mess around with electrolytes - particularly potassium without advice - Magnesium does help many and isn’t easily absorbed - if taken orally and not absorbed it will pass straight through you,

I have found the safest way to keep electrolytes in check is to add salt to food when cooking, to have weekly bathe in sea salt (or Epsom Salts), keep well hydrated and eat foods rich in Magnesium & Potasium - avacados, bannas etc

Hope that helps - best wishes CD.

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CD

Not with you on this one.

SSS untreated can be fatal. And no, Holter or CCU monitoring can't easily pick up SSS

Medics here don't self identify. We all have our area of expertise.

Enough already with the dogmatic statements 🙂

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Just to add to CDreamer's wise post- Jacket potatoes have about 1000mg of Potassium and I have reduced AF massively with a potassium rich diet plus Mag Citrate from my GP

Also, pauses will show on holter monitor and the cardiologists can see if pacemakers are needed. The modern pacemakers are wonderful and can monitor you from afar!!

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Did you have demonstrable low levels of red cell Mg or serum K ? If yes do you know the aetiology. Diuretics commonly cause hypokalaemia.

If renal function is normal, self medicating with minerals in the absence of specific depletion is pointless and potentially dangerous as tachp said.

The placebo effect can however be potent.

Adams Stokes episodes were first described 200 years ago and the diagnosis is usually evident with a careful history.

The variety of heart block can only be determined electrocardiographically.

It is not true that pauses are easily picked up with external monitoring. Sometimes an implantable recording device is necessary.

As ever, a little knowledge can be a idangerous thing.

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My Cardiologist and EP have lots of knowledge Pilgrim and all contributors here have their first hand experience to offer . I think some of your wide sweeping diagnoses without having the medical records of patients are much more questionable than us putting forward what we know from our experience. Please stop making these types of statements. We are all here to support each other. Not to criticise and score points!!

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rosyG

I can see that forum rules do not allow specific medical advice or suggested diagnosis. Let me put this to you.

A member says they have retrosternal discomfort at 0300 when the forum is deserted. Do we say ring 999?

Or do we ask if anything preceded it and perhaps discover they had a complicated ablation 2 days previously and the EP said there were some minor oesophageal erosions for which they had been given a PPI

If the member then says why must I ring 999, you obviously think I am having a heart attack Do we say we can not diagnose just ring 999?

I would value your advice as a member of long standing

Is this a matter of liability?

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In that situation I would always advise that they go to A and E - If they had just had an ablation I think they would mention that - but even then I would advise them to get checked out with any chest pain. I think the collective view usually is that it's better to be on the safe side. Some on the forum who have had ablation may well add their own experience of chest pain after ablation- which may be re-assuring- but they would probably add it's best to contact the hospital where the person was ablated and get checked out- sometimes there's an arrhythmia nurse but not, of course, at the time of night you mention.

When someone has mentioned chest, left arm and jaw pain, for example, I have said these need checking swiftly as may be heart related, rather than diagnosing an MI. Giving a diagnosis can lead to great alarm- and may not be accurate without all test results as i'm sure you appreciate.

Regarding liability, we have started a patient support group in Epsom and when chairing we always state that our speakers ( top cardiologists ad EPs) are just giving their opinions and only the person's own doctor, with all the information needed about their case, can change treatment. I think this applies here too as people would start/stop meds, be inclined to try perhaps unsafe RX etc.

I think the best way to use your considerable knowledge is to make suggestions which enable the person to seek the correct help- for example,you'll see some doing this when it is obvious a GP or cardiologist has not referred on so that people can have access to a full range of options for AF.

Also, knowing that electrolyte supplements can be dangerous , for example, and advising to check with GP about the best way to raise levels, is better than giving instructions about what to take- or not take ( not that you have said this but I'm trying to give examples of how vital help can be given but not in a prescriptive way.)

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rosyG

Thank you. Constructive and helpful. I will reflect.

Oh my, you said "considerable knowledge" - you have disarmed me madam, I am like putty in your hands,

Virtual hug 🙂 x

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Do you really feel thirsty for that much water? You may be drinking too much. If the kidneys can't keep up with filtering out all the water you are drinking, the electrolytes in your blood can become too diluted. Too little sodium can cause dizziness and fainting. Read more here freedrinkingwater.com/water...

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Ajit

It's a blood volume thing for some and a mantra for many Afibs. Try it.

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I had exactly the same thing , last visit to A&E then stay in cardio I was near blacking out every few seconds for 6 hours. The cardio decreased my levothiroxine dose and changed me from bisoprolol to flecinaid, I haven't had any symptoms for a year now

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Hi how low was your heart rate dropping to . I was diagnosed with af 2 years ago and my heart rate fluctuates between 33 and 103 at rest in or out of af

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Hi DaveBr my heart rate wasn’t as low as yours 33 is dangerously low, mine went down to 40 i was told by the dr any lower than 40 is critical glad your still here to talk about it cheers

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I hope you are feeling better Robbie and that you have sought assistance from your medics today. We are not medically qualified but can give you our support and understand how scary it all is. Your best outcome will be by ensuring that you get a full medical diagnosis as a priority.

Your medics will do a full work up and treat you appropriately. Please don't just put up with it or remain scared about what's happening to you. Big cyber hug coming your way.

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Thank you

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