AF Association
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Is my afib going away?

I was diagnosed on Aug 26, 2017. Woke up at night with with afib. Since then I was put on metoprolol. The 2nd episode was 47 days later. Then 18 days later, 3rd episode came. Another 18 days later, 4th episode happened. All woke me up at night.

After learning beta blocker doesn't prevent afib but just lower the heart rate when afib happens, I discussed with EP and stop taking metoprolol after the 4th episode. And I have flecainide and propranolol as pill-in-pocket. So I'm not taking any daily meds except for lorazepam to help my crazy scary mind.

Being said, without any daily meds, I'm running 49 days without an episode (longest time since diagnosis). Is my afib going away? I'm just looking for hope. The mental side is draining me.

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It is a tendency you will always have, but you may be able to prevent it returning by attention to lifestyle, diet, magnesium etc

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Thanks! I'm keeping my hope up.

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Hello li17, that's a bit like the $64,000 question!

It is generally recognised that AF responds positively to lifestyle changes as goldie suggests and avoiding all known triggers can make a big difference too. The truth is that there is no "cure" for AF but an awful lot can be done to keep it under some degree of control and getting the medication that's right for you will help a great deal. Like most of us, you are anxious about AF, I'm not sure if this will help, there are well over 1 million folk diagnosed with AF in the UK and probably 250,000 who have it and don't know it (therefore not taking anticoagulants). Just over 10,000 have joined the forum, many of whom are fairly dormant which is a roundabout way of suggesting that there is life after AF. It was being told this which helped me try and get AF into perspective (but I'm not suggesting it's easy). Good luck

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Hi Li 17.Only your doctor can let you know for sure what is happening with your a-fib. But I would suggest to err on the side of caution and stay in close contact with your doctor. I went two years between my first and second episode. I just joined this community-my main one is restless leg syndrome- and maybe my post written earlier this evening will help. I too have anxiety over this and occasionally take a Xanax when my fears take over. But I will share this with you. I was diagnosed in 2011, am now 73 and am doing fine. It is very possible to live comfortably with atrial fibrillation especially if you work closely and regularly with an Electrophysiologist you trust. I believe I have made some sort of peace with my a-fib and have even given my pacemaker(inserted November 2016) a name. I call him Seymour; thought he should have a name since we are very close and will be together for life. LOL I take this seriously but also feel at times a sense of humor helps. Good luck coming to terms with a-fib. A good life is possible. irina1975

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Hi Li 17. PS You might want to read my post to Slattery. irina1975

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Probably you may find some suggestion in my post "Paroxismal Afib, diet and lifestyle".

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"Pill in the pocket" is a reasonable strategy with paroxysmal afib. (Maybe not optimal). I would urge you to add an anticoagulant if you are not taking one now especially since for you afib seems to occur at night.

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