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Advanced Prostate Cancer
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Apricot Kernels

Does anyone know anything about apricot kernels or B17 tablets, do they help reduce PSA?

Jan

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I know they are full of cyanides. It does reduce PSA because dead people have no PSA.

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Jan,

The following is from MSK' s Cancer Center's website. B17 (also known as Laetrile) is very effective in bringing one's PSA down, simply because dead people don't make PSA.

Here is the quote:

Amygdalin (Laetrile) has toxic side effects and decreased survival in cancer patients.

Amygdalin (also called Laetrile®) is an extract derived from apricot pits and other plants. It can be broken down by enzymes in the intestine to produce cyanide, a known poison. It was first used in Europe and later in the United States as an alternative cancer therapy. Promoters claimed that the cyanide released from amygdalin selectively killed cancer cells, leaving normal tissue cells unharmed. When fed to laboratory animals that had cancer cells implanted in them, amygdalin did not reduce the tumor size or slow their growth. In a clinical study, cancer patients using amygdalin did not have any benefits but some showed cyanide toxicity.

There is renewed interest in studying amygdalin after the discovery of new anticancer mechanisms. However, cancer patients should not use this product in the current form until more is known about its safety and effectiveness.

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draxe.com/apricot-seeds/

Not a cancer cure but having a few a day may be beneficial.

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I've read that papaya leaf extract helps in PCa. I am giving papaya leaf tea to my dad. It is a natural immunity booster and believed to have anti cancer properties.

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It’s not a vitamin at all. There’s no such thing as vitamin B17. It’s been given that name to make it sound more acceptable, whereas it’s actually extremely dangerous, producing cyanide in the gut.

More voodoo therapy, to get desperate people to part with money. Disgraceful.

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Sorry but these supplements are not worth the expense. There is no evidence based research to support their use. Please talk to your oncologist.

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I concur with Wassersug and others. I heard about apricot kernels several months ago and searched the literature extensively. There is insufficient evidence to support taking this natural product and it is toxic.

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I have been aware of laetrile at least since 1980 when Steve McQueen died - it was one of the things that he tried in Mexico, along with coffee enemas & other treatments. Laetrile is what many remember so it's no surprise that I have met a number of men (online) who have tried it.

With ~3,000,000 men living in the U.S. who have been diagnosed with PCa, one would expect laetrile to have created some buzz if it had any efficacy.

As with other "cures" that have been around for decades, such as Budwig, I'm sure that a good number of men have tried it & moved on. These dubious treatments are kept alive by internet sites & the enthusiasm of people who are about to try it. For someone newly diagnosed it must appear from the internet that there might be benefit.

The Wikipedia page pours cold water on that idea, IMO:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amygd...

-Patrick

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I have tried Kernels and took them for around 6 months, it didn’t give me any bad side effects but as my PSA is now 0.01 on Zytiga and Zoladex it would be impossible to know if it lowered my PSA. 👍

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Pectasol-C might be worth a try. Supposed to inhibit metastases from taking root.

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