Gut bacteria could improve symptoms i... - Parkinson's Movement

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Gut bacteria could improve symptoms in Parkinson’s sufferers, study suggests

pvw2
pvw2

Gut bacteria could improve symptoms in Parkinson’s sufferers, study suggests

more.talktalk.co.uk/news/20...

Quote: The researchers also found the bacteria was able to prevent the formation of toxic alpha-synuclein clumps by producing chemicals that change how enzymes in cells process specific fats called sphingolipids.

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The actual paper isn't coming up right now, but it appears the strain is Bacillus subtilis PXN21.

scienceboard.net/index.aspx...

pvw2
pvw2 in reply to asecondforever

Quote from your link: The researchers showed that Bacillus subtilis PXN21, a probiotic strain of live bacteria that's available for human consumption, inhibits α-syn aggregation and removes aggregates in C. elegans model with expression of human α-syn. B. subtilis spores induce dietary restriction, which in turn activates the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, a main system of α-syn clearance in cells. This at least partially explains the mechanism of action.

I guess it is a secret, till they can start making money.

pvw2
pvw2 in reply to parkie13

Bacillus subtilis is common if you look at probiotic supplements, but they don't list PXN21.

asecondforever
asecondforever in reply to pvw2

Yeah, might have to contact companies individually to ask if it's the strain they use.

pvw2
pvw2 in reply to asecondforever

Found one so far powerofprobiotics.com/Bacil...

However it mentions three strains and doesn't say which one is in products listed.

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to pvw2

Bio kult has patented pxn21

pvw2
pvw2 in reply to JayPwP

See:

"We therefore asked whether the observed effect on a-syn aggregation is unique to PXN21 or if it is shared among other strains of the B. subtilis species. We tested a panel of laboratory B. subtilis strains, including 168 (Zeigler et al., 2008), JH642 (Smith et al., 2014), and the undomesticated strain NCIB 3610 (Branda et al., 2001). All strains showed similar effects on a-syn aggregation to the probiotic strain PXN21 following the continuous or food-switching regime (Figures 2F and 2G), indicating that the anti-aggregation effect is a general property of the B. subtilis species. Furthermore, all tested B. subtilis strains extended the lifespan of a-syn-expressing transgenic animals (Figure 2H; Table S1)."

in healthunlocked.com/parkinso...

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to pvw2

Thanks

This particular strain of Bacillus Subtilis PXN21 has also shown the ability to suppress C-diff. in this 2014 study :

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/248...

Art

This one has it, but it also has about a dozen other species of bacteria.

amazon.com/Bio-Kult-F7057-B...

Art

Telegraph newspaper did tests, bio kult (capsule?) containd pxn21 but failed tests including ability to survive in stomach apparently.

Bio–Kult (capsule)

Bacillus subtilis PXN 21; Bifidobacterium bifidum PXN 23; Bifidobacterium breve PXN 25; Bifidobacterium infantis PXN 27; Bifidobacterium longum PXN 30; Lactobacillus acidophilus PXN 35; Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus PXN 39; Lactobacillus casei PXN 37; Lactobacillus plantarum PXN 47; Lactobacillus rhamnosus PXN 54; Lactobacillus helveticus PXN 45; Lactobacillus salivarius PXN 57; Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis PXN 63; Streptococcus thermophilus PXN 66

pvw2
pvw2 in reply to Ratzkywatzky

I keep wondering if a suppository would work better.

The articles on this subject have exploded in the last 24 hours. Many mention Bacillus subtilis and leave of the strain PXN 21.

Gut Bacteria Protects Against Alpha-Synuclein Buildup in Nerve Cells in Worm Model, Study Shows

parkinsonsnewstoday.com/202...

My concern is that human trials rarely consider evaluating PD subcategories even though we can only do so crudely if objective. Trials could consider tremor versus no tremor, age PD diagnosed, chemical exposure (e.g. agent orange), other illnesses such as low thyroid, diabetes, high blood pressure which may be related to a cause of PD, and genetic markers if available. A trial may miss that something is successful for a particular group that is a minor part of the whole.

Quotes: Worms raised on a specific strain of B. subtilis, called PXN21, showed a near-total absence of these clumps, compared with worms on other diets. B. subtilis also managed to clear away clumps that had already formed in older worms, which were later switched to the B. subtilis diet. The probiotic’s protective effects lasted over the worms’ lifespan and improved locomotion defects associated with the toxic clumps.

...

While encouraging, these findings are quite early and must be corroborated in other settings. Mice, a model organism much more closely related to humans than worms, will be a logical next step. If all goes well and a probiotic-based Parkinson’s therapy makes it to clinical trials, these could be fast-tracked, as probiotic B. subtilis is already commercially available.

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