still around....no quit yet

Hi to all that know me. Im afraid i have not yet conquered the quit. I have allan carrs book and i have read a chapter but thats it... As some know ive been to hell and back and the road is still long i am aware that i need to quit and have had days where i have only puffed 2 fags but i also know that puffing fags is not good i hate the smell but just cannot seem to stay focused. The longest i quit for was 3m and 3days and to top it all the stresses i went through bothered me but i guess i just couldnt take anymore. I know that when things in my awkward life settle down and know where i will be i will quit. Whoever reads this thankyou for reading but those who know me will know how ive been. Love to all. Jacqui

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  • Jacqui

    Your time will come and when it does there will be plenty of people here for you, old and new.

    Good thing is that as you are posting you are still thinking of quitting.

    One day you will be in the penthouse.

    H

  • Aww Jockey ;)

    It'll come, don't worry.

    I know you love them, and I know you'll know the song, but the lyrics seem perfect for you at this present time...

    All we all want is to see you smile :)

  • Jacqui, we will all be here for you when you decide you are ready to come back. Hope things have improved for youxxx

  • Thanks Capitan my fave song thanks Haze and thanks H. Will be surfing the forum so i will be letting u know when i quit. Jacqui x

  • Wishing you luck....the longer you put it off the worse your health will get (ask me how I know). But, it must be your descision and until that day comes just remember we are all here and when you are ready some one will be here to help you and support you and listen to you...whatever you may need at that time.

    Until then, stay with us so you continue to think aboutit....ppat

  • Hi Jacqui - our journeys to a smoke free life are all as individual as we are, but the support of this forum is a constant. If you're still logging on, you still want to quit. And if you want to quit, you'll get there eventually. You know you will.

    Keep logging in, keep posting, never give up giving up,

    Sue

    x

  • Hi! I haven't quit yet either, keep telling myself tomorrow but obviously tomorrow never happens..............not for my quit anyway!

    Friends who have quit have told me you need to have the right mindset and I can only assume I'm not in that right place yet! I question myself daily..........and I can't seem to get my head in that place............I've no idea what I'm doing wrong??

    However I do know that since I became unemployed, my smoking has got worse. I'm already a nicotine and caffeine addict so now my days seem to be filled with lashings of both substances! No wonder I always feel ill in some way!

    I know this is my own doing and I've only myself to blame............but I need help reaching the place in my mind as to where I need to be to totally change my life!

    Sorry for the rant...........but I needed to off load somewhere!

  • I thought my head wasn't in the right place either. The night before my quit I didn't expect to last 10 minutes because I always smoked at least 5 fags with my first cup of tea. I surprised my self by being quit for almost 17 weeks.

    Give it a go. Nothing ventured nothing gained

  • 3 months & 3 days quit & it was still bothering you? Sounds like your mental state was all wrong, by that point it should have been nothing more than a passing thought.

    Try reading that Allen Carr book instead of just throwing it to one side after a chapter. Might dispell some of the myths that you seem to have about smoking & let you take it off that pedestal you have it on & drop it into the gutter where it belongs.

  • 3 months & 3 days quit & it was still bothering you? Sounds like your mental state was all wrong, by that point it should have been nothing more than a passing thought.

    Try reading that Allen Carr book instead of just throwing it to one side after a chapter. Might dispell some of the myths that you seem to have about smoking & let you take it off that pedestal you have it on & drop it into the gutter where it belongs.

    Everyone's different in there quit MrE. Can take up too a year for your mental state to be alterd into thinking your a non smoker.

    I do t no how ppl can dare tell other people how they should or shouldn't be feeling after a certain point in there quit.

    And personally I tryed to read Allan car book and fort it was a load of rubbish. But that's just my opinion on it.

  • I totally agree with Shelley about everything including Allan Carr's book.

  • Hi to all that know me. Im afraid i have not yet conquered the quit. I have allan carrs book and i have read a chapter but thats it... As some know ive been to hell and back and the road is still long i am aware that i need to quit and have had days where i have only puffed 2 fags but i also know that puffing fags is not good i hate the smell but just cannot seem to stay focused. The longest i quit for was 3m and 3days and to top it all the stresses i went through bothered me but i guess i just couldnt take anymore. I know that when things in my awkward life settle down and know where i will be i will quit. Whoever reads this thankyou for reading but those who know me will know how ive been. Love to all. Jacqui

    Hey Jacqui,

    Great to see you posting again and remember to give yourself credit for the 3 months 3 days you were quit :) I too have been to hell and back recently for different reasons to you, and I've spent the last 3 weeks in hospital overcoming another addiction and while I hoped to get through it without smoking it was just too tough at the time, especially being around other smokers 24/7 :( And the advice was not to do the 2 things at once anyway. But I do miss being quit smoking and like you I intend to do it again when I get back onto an even keel cos I don't enjoy smoking either. But its baby steps for me and I guess its the same for you too. But we both know we CAN do it and we have got it in us to succeed. Have been thinking about you Jacqui, take care of yourself and we will both quit again when we are ready

    ;)

    Love,

    Zoe xxxx

  • Thanks Una ;) I'm doing okay, looking forward to getting my quit back soon but don't want to push myself too hard at the mo or I will have a spectacular disaster again lol :rolleyes: think I'm beyond zany by now :D xx

  • Everyone's different in their quit MrE. Can take up to a year for your mental state to be altered into thinking you're a non smoker.

    I don't know how people can dare tell other people how they should or shouldn't be feeling after a certain point in their quit.

    And personally I tried to read Allen Carr's book and thought it was a load of rubbish. But that's just my opinion on it.

    What? How i dare? Excuse me for trying to be helpful. Maybe the fact that she tormented herself for almost 4 months means that she should maybe try something different? Oh, but no. You 'fort' it was rubbish so it must be so...

  • What? How i dare? Excuse me for trying to be helpful. Maybe the fact that she tormented herself for almost 4 months means that she should maybe try something different? Oh, but no. You 'fort' it was rubbish so it must be so...

    Telling ppl that their mental state is all wrong. Your just another I have read Alan Carr book. So you must no everything about a quit and how people should be doing upto a certain point. The how dare you wasn't aimed at just you. But everyone like you. That I get sick of seeing on here

    So congratulations on reading a book and being another smarmy git who thinks they no everything.

    And you can spell out my spelling mistackes all you want.. As I just find it idiotic childish and pathetic.

  • Yeah, that was dickish, i admit. But i was put out by your 'how dare you' nonsense.

    One thing i will say though, i've quit more times than i care to admit. Many different ways, through many different methods & with varying degrees of success. So i'm not just someone who's read a book & thinks he knows it all, i've f***ing been through it.

    Gotta love how hypocritical you are though. You tell me everyone's quit is different and then rubbish my suggestion purely because it didn't work for you. Then you tell me i'm a know-it-all in spite of knowing absolutely nothing about me.

    Well done.

  • Yeah, that was dickish, i admit. But i was put out by your 'how dare you' nonsense.

    One thing i will say though, i've quit more times than i care to admit. Many different ways, through many different methods & with varying degrees of success. So i'm not just someone who's read a book & thinks he knows it all, i've f***ing been through it.

    Gotta love how hypocritical you are though. You tell me everyone's quit is different and then rubbish my suggestion purely because it didn't work for you. Then you tell me i'm a know-it-all in spite of knowing absolutely nothing about me.

    Well done.

    I didn't rubbish ur suggestions of the book I said iv tried to read it and I didn't like it. I said that's my opinion.

  • 3 months & 3 days quit & it was still bothering you? Sounds like your mental state was all wrong, by that point it should have been nothing more than a passing thought.

    Try reading that Allen Carr book instead of just throwing it to one side after a chapter. Might dispell some of the myths that you seem to have about smoking & let you take it off that pedestal you have it on & drop it into the gutter where it belongs.

    Mental reprogramming can happen very quickly in some.... reading Allen Carr can sort of hypnotize you in a way by shifting your thinking which is needed to stop smoking for good..... very powerful stuff BUT..... sadly it doesn't work for everyone. It took me about 9 months or so to get to the 'passing thought' stage and a year to have days not thinking of smoking at all. I really wanted it to be easy, trust me! Sometimes I think though that the people who struggle the most appreciate the freedom the most. I'm near 4 years quit and I still get days when I'm completely tickled by the fact that smoking no longer dictates my life. Everyone is different but we are all capable. :)

  • Mental reprogramming can happen very quickly in some.... reading Allen Carr can sort of hypnotize you in a way by shifting your thinking which is needed to stop smoking for good..... very powerful stuff BUT..... sadly it doesn't work for everyone. It took me about 9 months or so to get to the 'passing thought' stage and a year to have days not thinking of smoking at all. I really wanted it to be easy, trust me! Sometimes I think though that the people who struggle the most appreciate the freedom the most. I'm near 4 years quit and I still get days when I'm completely tickled by the fact that smoking no longer dictates my life. Everyone is different but we are all capable. :)I agree completely, i had sudden random cravings up to a year in, but having read a lot of Fleetwood's previous posts, she seemed to be absolutely gasping for a fag 90% of the time.

    The only way that's possible is if you're doing a sacrifice quit, which i've also done before & was close to chewing my own arm off. Hence my suggestion of giving the book a read, since she has it sitting there unread. I'm not saying it'll definitely work, but it can't hurt can it?

  • The only way that's possible is if you're doing a sacrifice quit, which i've also done before & was close to chewing my own arm off. Hence my suggestion of giving the book a read, since she has it sitting there unread. I'm not saying it'll definitely work, but it can't hurt can it?

    Absolutely.... even if the book doesn't cause one to enjoy the process of quitting it will still be a good way to start thinking about the quit differently. I like how you call it 'sacrifice quit' so so true.... had many of those before this one and yes, chewing appendages off was definitely part of each one hahaha ;)

  • I have been singing Allen Carr's praises from the rooftops, simply because this is my third quit, and the only one where I haven't felt deprived, miserable, irritable or permanently hungry.

    It is hard to read or listen to the repetitive, slightly patronising prose in the book, but in my mind it was only because deep down I knew he was right and I was wrong. I didn't enjoy smoking. I felt stupid for claiming that I did. And those sort of things are never easy to admit to yourself, let alone anyone else.

    I do believe he is fundamentally correct when he states that we smoke for no reasons other than a set of bizarre psychological mind tricks, and a mild substance addiction. I think where he goes wrong is assuming that the mind tricks are so easily unravelled and dispelled for everyone. Our triggers, although similar for many of us, are also subtly different.

    I still recommend it for people who haven't tried it though.

  • It is. It's terribly written, it drones on & on & makes the same points over & over again. But, he does a good job of making smokers actually stop & look at the habit logically, which is something the majority of us had never done.

    Almost all of us romanticised cigarettes in some way, and to look at them from an entirely different perspective can really crack some of the chains that bind us to the habit.

  • 3 months & 3 days quit & it was still bothering you? Sounds like your mental state was all wrong, by that point it should have been nothing more than a passing thought.

    I am 1 year and 1 month into my quit and still not at the point when it's nothing more than a passing thought. Some days I really crave all day and am glad when it's bedtime to stop me thinking about them, other days I don't think about them at all - I wouldn't say my mental state is wrong, just that everyone is different.

    .

  • This is the first quit where I haven't put on weight, been irritable with friends and family, or felt the need to avoid alcohol and social situations. It is the first quit where I actually don't feel that I'm depriving myself of something.

    The point with Allen Carr though is that, if you even half take on board the points he makes, you will initially feel insulted and irritated. It is really hard to be called (albeit indirectly) stupid and a fool without taking it even slightly personally.

    To anyone feeling scared or panicky at the prospect of quitting, I reckon this book is gold. By the time I got two chapters from the end, I was actually looking forward to the quit. Now almost at week four, and not one serious craving. I also look at people smoking with very different emotions to those during previous quits.

    Nothing works for everyone, but Carr has a pretty impressive success rate. I thought the book was brilliant, personally.

  • Hi Karri

    Here is another way of looking at "forever":

    I have heard of people who have taken up smoking later in life (not many are that dumb, I grant you that!). Suppose someone starts smoking at the age of 45. Up until that point, if they had been asked "do you smoke" they would have said something like "no, I'm a non-smoker, I have never smoked". That would be completely true and they would have no doubt about it whatsoever. Total certainty. The implication would be that they would never smoke in the future as well.

    And yet, a little while later they would start smoking......... So, even a person who has never smoked cannot, strickly speaking, claim that they will never smoke!

    What that means is that no-one (including people who have never smoked) can claim with absolue certaintly that they will remain smoke-free forever! All they can do is somehow imply that they will never smoke in the future. The thing is that, despite this handicap, it turns out that many people do remain smoke free. You can too.

  • That's a good way of looking at it. I was one of those who wouldn't have stopped if I thought it was forever. I had to convince myself that it was a short term measure. At nearly 5 months I never want to smoke again.

  • final destination

    Having browsed this thread and views and the thoughts,opinions expressed on the merits and demerits of the multitude ways of handling our quit I should like to throw my tuppence worth into the ring.

    Just how we achieve our goal of stopping smoking is highly personal and of no concern to other "quitters".

    A large dose of mutual respect would not go amiss.

    Michael a.k.a:- lefoy123 in Glasgow

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