"One Thing at a time" overrated?

As some of you may have read in my previous threads, I have recently been diagnosed as diabetic so I have made drastic changes in all aspects of my lifestyle.

When you hear about people doing this, the general advice is often along the lines of "one thing at a time" or "don't take on too much at one time."

I am wondering if doing more than one thing at a time can actually be helpful. I am already in the mode of making large changes, so to add on another does not seem that scary.

The changes can also compliment each other. Examples:

A fear of stopping smoking is often putting on weight, so eating healthier and exercising will help to combat this.

[*]Exercise can help with cravings. When you are ready to cave in, going for a brisk walk may help. Running on a treadmill and you will not be thinking about smoking.

[*]Not smoking can make exercise feel easier.

[*]Eating healthier can help you get more benefit from exercise.

[*]Stopping smoking can help you taste food better. What better time to eat fresh, healthy, tasty and new foods?

Anyway, this is just some thoughts I was having, I'd be interested to hear any comments you would have. I'm sure that there are more examples that I have listed above.

4 Replies

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  • I sort of agree... I started exercising loooads when I quit which was great as I felt myself getting stronger - HOWEVER, I found it difficult to not eat fatty food.

    As it is I don't really like junk food that much, I usually make my own meals but even those can be really really fatty (sausage and mash, fish and chips etc). Then when I quit I also started making cakes and other sweet things... I think asking me to not eat either of these food 'types' would have really annoyed me at the begginning of my quit as I saw them as rewards.

    I think that's why people say that 'one thing at a time' thing. Also, for some people (like you probably I'm supposing) it helps to just turn your whole life around. If your old life reminds you of lazily lying around and smoking then completely overhaul your like to fit your new 'non-smoking' self :)

  • I think it's down to the individual and how you feel at the time. Personally in the past i've managed to quit smoking (for a period of time) but my eating goes to hell, OR healthy eating and excersie, but kept smoking - not mastered all at once yet!

    The only thing you need to be careful of is making excuses to start smoking again - which i have done many times - i.e i dont want to be fat so i'll lose weight first, THEN give up - that is just nicotine cravings trying to lure you back!

    Sounds like you have the right mindframe though - seeing it as one complimenting the other.:)

  • I totally agree. I have started to pile on some pounds. It was my downfall last time and my biggest excuse to smoke.

    So I have to do the exercise thing and try and keep food under control. I have decided to allow myself a 1/2 stone buffer but I cant go above that. This seems I can given in to my appetite (IT IS HUGE) but the payback is the cross trainer/jog :(

  • I totally agree. I have started to pile on some pounds. It was my downfall last time and my biggest excuse to smoke.

    So I have to do the exercise thing and try and keep food under control. I have decided to allow myself a 1/2 stone buffer but I cant go above that. This seems I can given in to my appetite (IT IS HUGE) but the payback is the cross trainer/jog :(

    Change that :( to a :)...

    "Wow... I can eat that extra serving of chips. All I need to do is spend an hour on the cross trainer :)"

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