Dyscalculia

Hope I have spelt this correctly.

Okay my child was diagnosed with Dyslexia but it doesn't seem to be so serious .His grades are actually quite good now.However I've noticed when doing maths there seems to be a twisting around of numbers.

Instead of writting 48, 84.But this child is also bilingual so I don't know whether it's because you might be saying the numbers the wrong way round in your head.

Anyone got any experiences with that?

Should I be looking up another group for this issue.

Also many thanks to all the other people who have answered me before.

This forum had been really supportive and helpful thanks all.

4 Replies

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  • I don't think the second language is an issue. If your child were not dyslexic there would be very little interference from the second language. Dyscalculia is very common among dyslexics. So, maths has to be taught in the same methodical way that you would teach phonics and reading. Small steps, overlearning, lots of games etc. You may notice that your child won't be able to learn the timestables by rote. So a timetable square should be used.

    Have you seen this? community.dyslexicadvantage...

    Your child will learn maths with proper support and teaching methods. It will be at his/her pace. Hope this helps.

  • Yes, I switch numbers around all the time. I also switch letters around when I am reading and writing. I don't remember having any problems learning to read but I never let my left brain take over like other kids so I could read faster. I was too busy playing word scramble. On the plus side I was too busy plodding through my textbooks to party in college and get in trouble.

    No two dyslexics are alike in severity or symptoms. Dyscalculia is considered a type of dyslexia. So don't listen to those "experts" saying "this is what dyslexics see." No, it should be "this is what some dyslexic see." This is why three-quarters of dyslexics don't know they are dyslexic.

  • Dyscalculia

    Developmental dyscalculia is a condition that affects the ability to acquire arithmetical skills (Department for Education, 2001). Dyscalculic learners may have difficulty understanding simple number concepts, lack an intuitive grasp of numbers, and have problems learning number facts and procedures. Even if they produce a correct answer or use a correct method, they may do so mechanically and without confidence.

    Commonly there are processing speed and working-memory difficulties - the part of short-term memory which is concerned with immediate conscious perceptual and linguistic processing.

    Some Dyslexia Action centres provide an assessment and support for dyscalculia. This could involve:

    •assessing cognitive processing skills (working memory and processing speed);

    •doing a standardised maths test;

    •observations and assessment of understanding of how the learner is tackling maths.

    To find out more please contact your local Dyslexia Action Learning Centre at dyslexiaaction.org.uk

  • Hope I have spelt this correctly.

    Okay my child was diagnosed with Dyslexia but it doesn't seem to be so serious .His grades are actually quite good now.However I've noticed when doing maths there seems to be a twisting around of numbers.

    Instead of writting 48, 84.But this child is also bilingual so I don't know whether it's because you might be saying the numbers the wrong way round in your head.

    Anyone got any experiences with that?

    Should I be looking up another group for this issue.

    Also many thanks to all the other people who have answered me before.

    This forum had been really supportive and helpful thanks all.

    DIAGNOSEDDYSCALCULIAHEADDYSLEXIA

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    3 Replies

    Giosang

    9 hours agoGiosang

    I don't think the second language is an issue. If your child were not dyslexic there would be very little interference from the second language. Dyscalculia is very common among dyslexics. So, maths has to be taught in the same methodical way that you would teach phonics and reading. Small steps, overlearning, lots of games etc. You may notice that your child won't be able to learn the timestables by rote. So a timetable square should be used.

    Have you seen this? community.dyslexicadvantage...

    Your child will learn maths with proper support and teaching methods. It will be at his/her pace. Hope this helps.

    Reply Recommend (0)

    UaLiathain

    7 hours agoUaLiathain

    Yes, I switch numbers around all the time. I also switch letters around when I am reading and writing. I don't remember having any problems learning to read but I never let my left brain take over like other kids so I could read faster. I was too busy playing word scramble. On the plus side I was too busy plodding through my textbooks to party in college and get in trouble.

    No two dyslexics are alike in severity or symptoms. Dyscalculia is considered a type of dyslexia. So don't listen to those "experts" saying "this is what dyslexics see." No, it should be "this is what some dyslexic see." This is why three-quarters of dyslexics don't know they are dyslexic.

    Reply Recommend (0)

    DyslexiaAction1

    a minute agoDyslexiaAction1 Volunteer

    Dyscalculia

    Developmental dyscalculia is a condition that affects the ability to acquire arithmetical skills (Department for Education, 2001). Dyscalculic learners may have difficulty understanding simple number concepts, lack an intuitive grasp of numbers, and have problems learning number facts and procedures. Even if they produce a correct answer or use a correct method, they may do so mechanically and without confidence.

    Commonly there are processing speed and working-memory difficulties - the part of short-term memory which is concerned with immediate conscious perceptual and linguistic processing.

    Some Dyslexia Action centres provide an assessment and support for dyscalculia. This could involve:

    •assessing cognitive processing skills (working memory and processing speed);

    •doing a standardised maths test;

    •observations and assessment of understanding of how the learner is tackling maths.

    To find out more please contact your local Dyslexia Action Learning Centre at dyslexiaaction.org.uk

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