Lysine Is An Effective Preventative In Me... - Cure Parkinson's

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Lysine Is An Effective Preventative In Medical Professionals Dealing With Covid-19 Patients Everyday For 3 Months

chartist profile image

Yesterday I made a reply to one of Marc's recent posts, but there was some very interesting information in that post that I would like to highlight as I feel it is very important for anyone living on this planet in the age of Covid!

In my reply to Marc, I linked to a July 2021 study that showed that Benfotiamine decreased Lysine levels in humans by 10 fold. I know that Lysine can help prevent or ameliorate some viral infections, so reducing it by 10 fold may not be a great idea in the time of SARS CoV-2. Here is a link to the study :

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl....

Here are a few very relevant quotes from this study "

>>> ' Lysine and Lys-ester can prevent SARS-CoV-2 and IAV infection, particularly in the entry stage. In contrast to that, Arg-ester can potently boost infection of both viruses. It would therefore be beneficial to consider the nutrient intake of COVID-19 and flu patients. We recommend the inclusion of lysine supplementation in addition to a reduced arginine intake for the prevention and treatment of SARS-CoV-2 and IAV infections. ' <<<

>>> ' We showed that lysine and Lys-ester can attenuate SARS-CoV-2 infection in the cell culture system (Figure 2A). Consistent with a previous study, IAV replication was also inhibited by lysine (Figure 4) [20]. Lysine therapy has long been recommended against HSV infection because it can suppress viral replication and inhibit virus yield [23,26,27,28,38]. HSV growth in both cell and tissue cultures that were supplemented with arginine was suppressed upon the addition of lysine [22]. A trial conducted on subjects with recurrent HSV infection also proved the efficacy of lysine treatment against HSV when the lysine group reported less recurrence, shortened healing time, and milder symptoms during six months of taking L-lysine monohydrochloride tablets while avoiding arginine-rich foods. [27]. These are just a few of the studies proving the efficacy of lysine as a prophylactic agent for HSV infection. Considering the prophylactic effects of lysine, a recent observational study was conducted using lysine therapy as prophylaxis for SARS-CoV-2 infection. ' <<<

>>> ' Among 30 medical professionals with daily face-to-face exposure to COVID-19 patients, all remain negative of the virus after taking 2000 mg lysine daily with required dietary restrictions (no caffeine, marijuana and arginine-rich foods) for 3 months, as compared to an average of two employees being infected every month prior to the study and to a public health department with similar capacity as their control group [39]. Our study validates that lysine has protective effects against SARS-CoV-2 and IAV infection. Thus, lysine supplementation may be considered as prophylaxis and therapeutic tool against these viruses. ' <<<

Given the results of this study which was posted 8 months ago, where are the follow up studies??? This was only a 30 participant study, but the results were so good, why aren't these scientists who are so hell bent on finding a cure for Covid-19 treating this study with any urgency?

Lysine is inexpensive readily available over the counter and has a very good safety profile and an excellent safety profile at the dose used in this study of 2 grams per day.

None of the medical personnel who used it as a prophylactic against SARS CoV-2 got sick or had ill effects from the treatment . I've used Lysine at higher doses and never noticed ill effects.

Clearly the vaccines are not a preventative as people who are fully vaccinated still get Covid-19, albeit to a lesser extent and with better outcomes. The virus seems to mutate or form variants faster than vaccines can keep up with, so why would scientists not want to further test an inexpensive and readily available supplement that has shown the potential to keep you from ever getting sick in the first place . This could make Covid -19 vaccines obsolete and put more of a dent in stopping this virus than all efforts to date! Or maybe I am just looking at this all wrong!

Art

96 Replies

Good article! Thanks for sharing! If you don't mind my asking are you vaccinated? I'm not but would consider the lysine. What foods are high in arginine? I take a daily multiple vitamin that has amino acids in it.

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to Smittybear7

I never got vaccinated because I never felt the vaccination did as much as what I use, but I am not completely opposed to the vaccination at all. Here is a link to a list of foods high in Arginine :

medicalnewstoday.com/articl...

Art

Smittybear7 profile image
Smittybear7 in reply to chartist

Thanks so much for your help

Very interesting. A list of lysine rich foods:greatist.com/eat/lysine-foo...

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to park_bear

Thank you for that p_b!

Looks like two cups of yogurt is close to the study dose.

I just don't understand why the non-pharmaceutical researchers aren't pursuing this angle with any urgency? Cases of Covid-19 in the US are starting to rise again. As long as it is around it can continue to mutate or create new variants, which is not a good thing.

worldometers.info/coronavir...

Art

Sydney75 profile image
Sydney75 in reply to chartist

It's all about $$.

We had covid twice about year apart. Not vaxed, both cases relatively mild. It did temporarily set back HWP symptoms. Vax not available around time of 1st infection, then some family members (same household) got Vaxxed, then we all got covid a few months later. Mild cases. Vax status did not have much impact in terms of not getting covid in my household.

We do used higher dose Vitamin C,

Melatonin, D and Zinc. HWP got vitamin C infusion and vitamin D shot when positive for C19. Also use some Chinese herbs etc.

Had antibodies checked anything over 10 good. I was 37 HWP 487. Interesting!

Lysine is a good addition. Many on HU are vaxed that's fine. My sister working as a NP in hospital 3x vaxed around covid patients has not gotten covid, even though her husband who is 3x vaxxed did. Covid is very strange, and will be around for a while.

Building up immune system a good start.

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to Sydney75

You're very fortunate to have had such mild cases of Covid twice. I recently had a very close friend die from Covid-19 complications after getting it twice. Sadly they would not even consider taking melatonin. Had I known about this study I would have recommended Lysine in place of melatonin. I will miss my friend very much.

Art

Sydney75 profile image
Sydney75 in reply to chartist

I agree, my sister in law was very sick, the monoclonal antibodies changed the course of her covid in less than 24 hours. We are indeed blessed, followed a strong immune protocol, when we got lazy with it, we got covid the second time. Both times MD really bumped up the melatonin. Would not give us the antiviral paxlovid, said we were not sick enough and as it was just released there were too many unknown side effects. I haven't followed the results of paxlovid. I am adding Lysine, checked it for interactions, it is used to treat herpes virus and high doses help schizophrentic patients.

I am sorry for the loss of your friend.

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to Sydney75

Thank you, Sydney on the loss of my friend. It hasn't fully sunken in yet.

I am very glad to hear that your doctor recommended and used melatonin. That is a step in a good direction.

I have seen melatonin reverse Covid-19 over night at high dose. Melatonin and Lysine together might be quite useful for Covid-19.

Art

MBAnderson profile image
MBAnderson in reply to chartist

I'm sorry for your loss.

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to MBAnderson

Thank you, Marc.

Art

“July 2021 study that showed that Benfotiamine decreased Lysine levels in humans by 10 fold”😯.

I take Benfotiamine. I should likely stop. What about TTFD?

Thank you Art!

🌸Novice Newbie

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to

NR,

Apparently you are okay if you have AD, because in that group, Lysine levels actually increased, but that apparently might be a problem for people with AD. According to p_b's link, there are plenty of foods to help restore lysine levels, so both are probably still doable that way. They didn't mention TTFD or B1.

Art

LAJ12345 profile image
LAJ12345 in reply to chartist

AD?

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to LAJ12345

AD = Alzheimer's Disease. The people with AD had their lysine levels rise not decrease drastically.

Art

LAJ12345 profile image
LAJ12345 in reply to chartist

Wow that’s interesting. So not a good idea to dose with lysine if you might be prone to AD?

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to LAJ12345

That is a good question and I don't know the answer.

Art

LAJ12345 profile image
LAJ12345 in reply to chartist

Today my teenage son has tested positive for covid and hubby also feeling unwell but I don’t have any lysine. What is the best thing to give him from what I might already have? Nac? He has Hardys which has vitamins, minerals

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to LAJ12345

I have seen melatonin work, but I believe melatonin is prescription only where you are. NAC at high dose has shown benefit .

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/355...

Art

LAJ12345 profile image
LAJ12345 in reply to chartist

Thanks, I get melatonin illicitly from overseas from whoever lets me buy it. I have a 10 mg one. Can you give it day and night or just at night?

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to LAJ12345

When I saw it work it was given round the clock. Here is some dosing info regarding how Dr. Neel uses it in his Covid=19 patients :

healthunlocked.com/cure-par...

Art

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to LAJ12345

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

LAJ12345 profile image
LAJ12345 in reply to chartist

What does tid mean? 0.6g tid in adults

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to LAJ12345

three times a day so every 8 hours

LAJ12345 profile image
LAJ12345 in reply to chartist

Ah, thanks

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to LAJ12345

This is recent by Dr. Reiter :

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

Art

LAJ12345 profile image
LAJ12345 in reply to chartist

That is quite a low dose then? 3,6 or 9 mg?

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to LAJ12345

No, he is recommending higher dosing such as Dr. Neel is using and they have collaborated on dosing before. Dr. Neel is using 1 mg per kilogram of body weight or a slightly lower dose than I take every night. He divides that dose around the clock. The doctors in Manila were using significantly higher dosing than Dr. Neel uses for most of his patients.

Art

LAJ12345 profile image
LAJ12345 in reply to chartist

Edit: So melatonin 20mg x3? and NAC 600mg x3? He is about 75kg

I gave him 4 Hardys which has 16 mg zinc and a liposomal vitamin c 1000mg

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to LAJ12345

The melatonin dose Dr. Neel is using effectively is 1 mg per kilogram of body weight. That would be 75 mg/day in divided doses.

Art

LAJ12345 profile image
LAJ12345 in reply to chartist

Ok thanks. Will see if he will comply😬

rescuema profile image
rescuema in reply to

This should not be interpreted as benfotiamine solely decreasing lysine. It simply means it increases the thiamine-dependent metabolism with the drastically improved thiamine level through increased bioavailability.

More from the article for better context -

"Rigorous statistical analyses revealed significant differences between the placebo and BFT treatment groups in 25 metabolites, including thiamine, tyrosine, tryptophan, lysine, and 22 lipid species, mostly belonging to phosphatidylcholines. Additionally, 10 of 11 metabolites and 14 of 15 lipid species reported in previous literature to follow AD progression changed in the opposite direction to those reported to reflect AD progression.

Of particular interest are four metabolites (thiamine, L-Tryptophan, Indole, and L-tyrosine with an area under the curve (AUC) > 0.7 that was significantly increased in treated serum samples, including the most significant one, thiamine, as expected, with a 100-fold increase (Figure 6A and Table 1). Thiamine has a log2(fold change) value of 6.66, with p value < 0.002, while both L-tryptophan and Indole show 1.6-fold increase with p value < 0.03. L-tyrosine increases by 1.7-fold with p value < 0.05. We also found that several metabolites of particular interest (e.g., Lysine, O-ureido-D-serine, androsterone sulfate, and 16 hydroxy decanoic acid) were significantly decreased in treated samples compared to placebo samples, 0.08-, 0.75-, 0.73-, and 0.48-fold, respectively

On the other hand, we found that lysine levels decrease dramatically by more than 10-fold with the intake of BFT for a prolonged time, while in AD, it was found to increase in plasma levels (Table 1) [29,47]. It was also found that lysine level in serum increases with thiamine deficiency, which, in turn, increases stress-induced anxiety level [48]. Oxoacid dehydrogenase (OADHc) is involved in lysine-derived 2-oxoadipate catabolism [49], which also required thiamine diphosphate as a cofactor to form glutaryl CoA. The data consistently showed that thiamine-dependent enzyme activity changes with BFT treatment and results in either an increase or a decrease in metabolites in those pathways. O-Ureido-D-Serine level was found to be decreased by 1.33-fold in serum sample of BFT treated individuals. This is a derivative of D-serine, a signaling molecule involved in neurotransmission. However, it was observed in previous studies that serum D-Serine level significantly increased with the early progression of AD [50,51]. The direct mechanism of benfotiamine that leads to the decreased D-serine is not clear. 16-hydroxyhexadeconoic acid is a hydroxy long chain fatty acid that decreases significantly in serum with BFT, suggesting that it might be due to alpha oxidation of hydroxy long chain fatty acid, as studies have found that α oxidation of fatty acids in peroxisomes by 2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase (HCAL1) enzyme uses thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)"

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

PWPs with lower protein intake and compromised protein absorption with gut dysbiosis should be especially watchful of quickly depleting lysine levels with ramped-up thiamine activities. The most common reason for lysine deficiency is not enough consump;tion of protein/animal products, common with c/l use. Lysine metabolism is also dependent on nutrients such as niacin, vitamin B6, riboflavin, iron, vitamin C, and glutamic acid, which PWPs are often metabolically compromised with.

People with herpes or viral diseases typically know to avoid high-arginine foods, such as hemp seeds and excess nuts, which directly antagonize lysine through competitive absorption, so excess arginine supplementation should be avoided for people prone to viral problems. However, this is almost akin to arguing over Zinc to Copper ratios - your body requires both in proper amounts. Look up the benefits of both.

healthline.com/nutrition/l-...

healthline.com/nutrition/ly...

We see in the article that even serine level decreases with benfotiamine. We learned from "Toxic Puzzle" that BMAA from blue-green algae competes with l-serine in the brain during protein synthesis, and the supplementation may be beneficial for people with ALS. Serine is a precursor for glycine and cysteine that are needed for the biosynthesis of glutathione. As such, I interpret it as thiamine availability opening up blocked processes utilizing serine for detox benefits while reducing homocysteine through SAM disposal via the transsulfuration pathway.

So as you can see, a similar can be said of lysine being used to form carnitine for mitochondrial energy production, collagen synthesis, immune response, etc with improved thiamine activities.

In the meanwhile, Art brings up a valid point that people should be watchful of potential deficiencies in any nutrient that may ensue with high-dose thiamine in any form, including depleted lysine, especially with inadequate protein digestion.

Timely information - thank you so much Art !

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to faridaro

faridaro,

I wish I could shout it to the world!

I just don't get why science and our government is essentially ignoring such potentially important information that could possibly put SARS CoV-2 in permanent check. They created multiple vaccines for it in a never before seen record time. The virus seems like it can rapidly work its way around those vaccines which could quickly render the current vaccines worthless. That approach will definitely make vaccine companies much wealthier, but not the best situation for the rest of the world.

Art

"I just don't get why science and our government is essentially ignoring such potentially important information that could possibly put SARS CoV-2 in permanent check."

There are 2 possibilities as I see it Art

The entire world (except maybe North Korea) is run by an evil corrupt conspiracy - called SMERSH and headed by a guy called Blofeld, who lives in a secret HQ with a white cat on his lap

OR

It ain't that simple. There is a lot of wishful thinking and outright misinformation in the world. Take Ivermectin cited by others (and before that Hydroxychloroquine) as examples.

Was your friend vaccinated?

Fully vaccinated , Richard.

Art

Boscoejean profile image
Boscoejean in reply to chartist

sad - and sorry to hear about your friend

". . .why aren't these scientists who are so hell bent on finding a cure for Covid-19 treating this study with any urgency?"

I have asked that question myself thousands of times, Art! It's not just Lysine, there are numerous supplements that prevent or even cure the virus. A simple inexpensive pill, IVERMECTIN, can eradicate not just COVID, but even cancer! Why the mandate for the jab?? The question is rhetoric. . .

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to Despe

The sad part, Despe is the US just surpassed one million dead or 1/6th of the total dead from Covid-19! But let's just ignore this study which seems like it could be quickly confirmed in hospitals treating Covid-19 patients around the world in a matter of a year or less and then be implemented to potentially eradicate the virus if it works as it did in the study. Covid doesn't seem like it is going anywhere any time soon.

Art

Boscoejean profile image
Boscoejean in reply to Despe

Ivermectin is not all sunshine and roses

Despe profile image
Despe in reply to Boscoejean

Try it, it won't kill you for sure!

Boscoejean profile image
Boscoejean in reply to Despe

it may not kill you but it can give you skin problems

Despe profile image
Despe in reply to Boscoejean

Have you tried it? Never heard of this reaction, but again there are people that are allergic to various substances.

Boscoejean profile image
Boscoejean in reply to Despe

yes I did take it and yes I do have a skin problem now

Despe profile image
Despe in reply to Boscoejean

May I ask why you took it?

Boscoejean profile image
Boscoejean in reply to Despe

it is kind of a long story - I was doing a volunteer job and got a skin problem from handling some used bedding I was laundering to be used by a pet shelter so then had to take the ivermectin to get rid of that and now I am left with a persistent skin problem in spite of the fact that the original problem has been cleared so I think that even though it was necessary I would not have taken it had it not been necessary

Despe profile image
Despe in reply to Boscoejean

Sorry to hear that.

ryzlot profile image
ryzlot in reply to Boscoejean

Is it possible that the skin issue is actually from the prt-bedding?

JR

Boscoejean profile image
Boscoejean in reply to ryzlot

no that issue is completely cleared but for some reason taking the ivermectin seems to have brought on a totally different skin problem that is called prurigo and it is not something you would want to take on so that is why I would hope people would not just try ivermectin without considering that it could cause skin issues because it causes intense itching and I am sure nobody needs that on top of other issues they might be dealing with

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to Boscoejean

I am curious and if you don't mind saying, what have you tried on the prurigo ?

Art

Boscoejean profile image
Boscoejean in reply to chartist

the dermatologist has done injections of prednisone and given us triamcinolone and hydrocortisone which does absolutely nothing for me and I have used over the counter benadryl ointment just because it is somewhat helpful for itching - the dermatologist suggests the use of some kind of light therapy but it entails having to go in several days a week and it is not that close to where we live so I am not excited about that- there are some things that I have read about that are not really options for me

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to Boscoejean

Thank you for the information!If you haven't tried it already, the following may be of interest to you :

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/112...

A word of warning, capsaicin can be extremely hot to most people, so you should keep that in mind when handling it and using it. It is derived from hot chili peppers and that explains the reason why. You never want to accidentally rub an itchy eye with a hand that has recently handled capsaicin and you want to be very thorough about washing it off of your hands. Here is a link to a typical product :

walgreens.com/store/c/walgr...

Art

Boscoejean profile image
Boscoejean in reply to chartist

I was given capsaicin years ago and I had a very bad reaction to it so that is not an option for me

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to Boscoejean

Another product consideration is topical colloidal silver applied frequently.

Art

Boscoejean profile image
Boscoejean in reply to chartist

thanks that I could probably try

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to Boscoejean

In my own personal experience I have had the best benefit using topical colloidal silver (CS) by keeping it wet. Let's say I want to treat a specific area on my forearm that is approximately 2" x 3". I cut an old cotton t-shirt up into a large square and then fold it up so that it is approximately 3" x 4" and then I wet it thoroughly with the CS and apply it over the treatment area. I then use an ACE elastic wrap wrapped around my forearm to hold it in place and help hold the moisture in. It will dry slower this way for each treatment and seems to be a bit more effective than just spraying it on. It is always a good idea to do a dime size spot test first in case a person is reactive to silver.

Art

You really caught my attention Art: "Benfotiamine decreased Lysine"

1: So I found a paper where you may have got this information: Serum Metabolomic and Lipidomic Profiling Reveals Novel mdpi-res.com/d_attachment/i...

Biomarkers of Efficacy for Benfotiamine in Alzheimer’s Disease

"On the other hand, we found that lysine levels decrease dramatically by more than

10-fold with the intake of BFT for a prolonged time, while in AD, it was found to increase

in plasma levels".

2: So in AD Lysine levels rise, Benfotiamine brings Lysine levels down. Bringing Lysine down might be a good thing I guess, so I started investigating WHY Lysine would rise in AD and discovered it rises because of a problem degrading Lysine. Your body does not create Lysine (I had guessed maybe your body produced Lysine to fight viruses, and had just read HSV might be a cause of PD, but no, the body does not produce Lysine in response to an infection. If Lysine is high, you have a problem degrading Lysine). All of this turned out to be moot, as Lysine is actually LOW in PwP: Biomarker: L-Lysine biomarkerbase.com/l-lysine "Low lysine levels have been found in patients with Parkinson's, hypothyroidism, kidney disease, asthma and depression."

3: So PwP have low Lysine levels. Why might PwP have low Lysine levels? Arginine is an amino acid your body produces that can lower your Lysine levels.

4: So should we avoid Arginine as it can lower Lysine levels? As our bodies produce Arginine, I don't know how to avoid Arginine. And there is this: A study showing "L-arginine represents a potential treatment agent for dopaminergic neuron degeneration in SNc observed in Parkinson's disease patients." europepmc.org/article/pmc/p...

5: So Benfotiamine lowers Lysine and MAY help PwP, and L-Arginine lowers Lysine and MAY help PwP. And Lysine fights viruses.

Which I guess brings me here (I am just spitballing here): If PD was an autoimmune disease, AND if Lysine helps fight viruses, MAYBE things like Benfotianine and L-Arginine lowering Lysine, so the body is not as aggressively attacking the viruses might be a good thing?

Of course, this does not explain why the Lysine is lower in PwP.

On the other hand: Any results showing Benfotiamine or Arginine helping PD are still animal models and speculative. Maybe PwP need their Lysine. So maybe avoid things that lower Lysine, OR if taking one of those things, maybe supplement with Lysine supplements. MAYBE the benefits of Benfotiamine and Arginine have nothing to do with lowering Lysine.

Sorry for the confusing comment. I did not resolve anything here.

Actually, a good comment pointing out potential interactions to consider. In cases like this best to be cautious about taking such reports at face value.

Sydney75 profile image
Sydney75 in reply to park_bear

This is the info I found on the Natural Database regarding Lysine. They did put a statement regarding effacy with covid 19. Perhaps this article is the beginning of the "good evidence", as it has been used successfully with herpes virus.

Overview

Lysine is an essential amino acid, one of 20 building blocks that are used to make proteins. It must be supplied by the diet (90646). Dietary sources of lysine include meat, fish, dairy, eggs, and some plants, such as soy and other legumes. Most vegetables and grains contain relatively little lysine (60620,90647,90648). Bacterial fermentation is used for commercial production of lysine (90930).

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19): Despite claims to the contrary, there is no good evidence to support using lysine for COVID-19. Recommend healthy lifestyle choices and proven prevention methods instead. For more information about natural medicines and COVID-19, see our latest articles and resources.

Safety

POSSIBLY SAFE ...when used orally in doses up to 3000 mg daily for up to one year (1114,1119,1120,90642,104104), or up to 6000 mg daily for up to 8 weeks (90644,90645). ...when used topically and appropriately, short-term (11051).

PREGNANCY AND LACTATION: Insufficient reliable information available; avoid using.

+ Adverse Effects

General: Orally and topically, lysine is generally well tolerated.

Most Common Adverse Effects:

Orally: Abdominal pain, diarrhea, and dyspepsia.

- Gastrointestinal

Orally, lysine has been reported to cause diarrhea and abdominal pain, including dyspepsia (1114,1115,1116,1118,1120).

- Renal

There is one case report of oral lysine use associated with tubulointerstitial nephritis progressing to chronic renal failure in a 44-year old female (1121).

+ Effectiveness

POSSIBLY EFFECTIVE

Herpes labialis (cold sores). Most clinical research shows that oral lysine can prevent and treat herpes labialis. The benefits of topical lysine are unclear.

INSUFFICIENT RELIABLE EVIDENCE to RATE

Athletic performance. Although there is interest in using oral lysine for improving athletic performance, there is insufficient reliable information about the clinical effects of lysine for this purpose.

Canker sores. It is unclear if oral lysine is beneficial in patients with canker sores.

Preliminary clinical research shows that taking oral lysine 500 mg daily may be beneficial for preventing canker sores, and taking oral lysine 4000 mg daily may be beneficial for decreasing the duration of canker sores (19390).

Diabetes. It is unclear if oral lysine is beneficial in patients with diabetes.

+ Details:

Hypertension. Limited clinical research shows that oral lysine can reduce blood pressure in hypertensive patients who have deficient dietary lysine intake.

+ Details:

Hypertriglyceridemia. It is unclear if oral lysine is beneficial for patients with hypertriglyceridemia.

+ Details:

Muscle strength. Higher dietary intake of lysine seems to improve muscle strength in young under- or well-nourished males.

+ Details:

Pressure ulcers. A small study suggests that topical lysine may be beneficial for pressure ulcers.

+ Details:

Schizophrenia. Large doses of oral lysine seem to improve schizophrenia symptoms in patients taking antipsychotic medications.

+ Details:

Stress. Limited clinical research in economically disadvantaged populations shows that fortifying wheat with lysine may reduce stress and anxiety.

+ Details:

More evidence is needed to rate lysine for these uses.

Dosing & Administration

Adult

Oral:

Lysine has been used in doses of up to 6 grams daily for 8 weeks. It is most often used in doses up to 3 grams daily for up to 1 year. See Effectiveness section for condition-specific information.

Topical:

Lysine has been used in various topical preparations. See Effectiveness section for condition-specific information.

Standardization & Formulation

Oral lysine evaluated in clinical research is commonly used in tablet or capsule form. Typically lysine is available as lysine hydrochloride, with lysine existing in the L-lysine form (1114,1115,1118,1119,1120,19396,90644). Topical lysine products are also available, using the hyaluronate salt (90641).'

+ Interactions with Drugs

5-HT4 AGONISTS

Interaction Rating = Minor Be watchful with this combination.

Severity = Mild • Occurrence = Unlikely • Level of Evidence = D

Theoretically, lysine may reduce the effects of 5-HT4 agonists.

-Syd

in reply to Bolt_Upright

Viruses are a contributor to ALZ

nature.com/articles/d41586-...

Dr. Rudolph Tanzi of Harvard has been speaking about this for years.

news.harvard.edu/gazette/st...

Which leaves me concerned and skeptical about targeting alpha synuclein. Aggregation not good obviously but what is it responding to? An autoimmune response kicked off by fungus, viruses, inflammation?

I have posted about fungus in the brain being identified as a culprit.

Night night

'Of course, this does not explain why the Lysine is lower in PwP."

See my response above.

Thanks Rescue. I still don't get it, but that is okay. There is a reason my avatar is a caveman :)

Lower protein consumption in PWP with compromised gut protein digestibility => Low Lysine.

Enough with self-deprecation Bolt. Besides, you already revealed your IQ is higher than most and you ask many valid questions. 😉

Oh yes, I did notice that lower protein intake (maybe due to avoiding protein so as not to conflict with L-Dopa?). I got distracted by your point that people with viruses know not to eat too many nuts and I eat so much peanut butter.

Thanks for the reminder. And thanks for all the other information you provide.

Sprouts are becoming one of my main pillars now. I have about 40 grams of broccoli sprouts and 20 grams of Daikon sprouts in a smoothie with a whole tomato, maybe a third of a lemon (with peel), minced garlic, hot sauce, hot pepper, pepper, and garlic powder. Every day. It is like a morning virgin bloody mary. I don't heat anything. Hopefully I am getting a good shot of Sulforaphane with this method.

>maybe due to avoiding protein so as not to conflict with L-Dopa?Exactly right. I set forth the evidence for that here:

healthunlocked.com/cure-par...

ryzlot profile image
ryzlot in reply to Bolt_Upright

Peanuts are not nuts though

JR

You're welcome Bolt. Sounds like you may be balancing your peanut butter with b sprouts. Here's a list to check your lysine and arginine food ratio. traditionaloven.com/tutoria...

Btw, the benefit of sulforaphane is believed to be hormetic, so you may be better off not overdoing it with constant consumption. I thought you were trying a lectin-free diet? - watch out with whole raw tomato - pretty high in lectin unless you peel the skin/seed and cook it.

Thanks for the Lysine/Arginine link! I think I am balancing my peanut butter with my daily over indulgence in Parmesan Cheese :)

And thank for the info on "hormetic". I found this: THE PHYTOPROTECTIVE AGENT SULFORAPHANE PREVENTS INFLAMMATORY DEGENERATIVE DISEASES AND AGE-RELATED PATHOLOGIES VIA NRF2-MEDIATED HORMESIS google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q...

I am basing my 40 grams of broccoli sprouts a day on this blog from 2014 (I do not usually source from blogs): epiphanyasd.blogspot.com/20... Just go down to "2. Eating Broccoli Sprouts" and it comes to the conclusion that 40 grams a day is the therapeutic dose. This seems to align with the theories on SurfaceYourRealSelf about taking SFN in large amounts every day.

In some areas I learn about the science, and then I put that science to the side. I consider it my being willfully stupid. I did stop eating lectins but I missed my daily tomato. And then I thought back to 2020 when I was eating super low carb and tomatoes with sardines were a staple for me and I felt GREAT! Add this information to the fact that science changes and scientists are constantly discovering that things they thought they knew they had totally backwards, and it puts me in the mind to trust my instinct on some things. I KNOW beans disturb my microbiome. Tomatoes have not. They both have lectins.

But I do appreciate all of the information that you and others share. I learn through osmosis. I hear something 100 times and then it falls into place. Time for me to shut up. Thanks!

Totally agree! In my opinion if public health authorities really cared about prevention of covid infections/complications they would be promoting vit. D supplementation first of all.

Also, vaccines carry risks of complications especially if not administered using needle aspiration which can lead to injecting it into a blood vessel with severe consequences. A few countries do needle aspiration but here in the US it's considered not necessary - probably because it would lead to some waste of the vaccine doses.

link.springer.com/article/1...

ryzlot profile image
ryzlot in reply to faridaro

The aspiration is critical. There are lots of indications that if the jab goes IV instead if IM it is the root of severe risk.

JR

faridaro profile image
faridaro in reply to ryzlot

Yes, in those cases it can lead to myocarditis (mRNA vaccinations) or to blood hypercoagulation (adenovirus vaccines).

Bolt,

I was aware of the importance of maintaining the proper Lysine/Arginine ratio from a previous self experiment where I let the ratio go to low which was detrimental for my health. I was not aware that Ben lowered it so significantly and for extended time. It certainly seems that if you are going to test Ben, it might be useful to increase Lysine levels via Lysine rich foods that park_bear mentioned or through supplementation. In my self test I used supplementing Lysine in order to get back to a healthier state quickly.

In this particular instance I am more focused on their findings that Lysine could prevent SARS CoV-2 and Influenza A virus and some decent follow up studies seem wholly logical and needed, but apparently only in my mind!

Art

Yes, I was torn between starting a new redundant post and respecting your post but taking your post on a detour :)

Detours are fine and common, Bolt. They happen all the time here. That's the way it seems to go when you are trying to research the available information. That's how I found the study on a detour off of one of Marc's recent posts.

Art

It’s all too complicated for me!

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to 134A

If Lysine works as they found in their medical personnel study, it could potentially prevent people from getting Covid-19 at all. That would be more than all of the scientific research that has been done on Covid-19 has been able to do since the virus arrived at the beginning of this pandemic. That's it in a nutshell.

Lysine is inexpensive :

swansonvitamins.com/p/swans...

Lysine is readily available.

Lysine does not require a prescription.

Lysine also prevents Influenza A virus

Lysine has an excellent safety profile at the dosage used in the study.

The burning question is why there have not been any follow up studies to confirm that preliminary study as that study was listed on PubMed 8 months ago and nothing since.

Art

I had a Genova NutrEval test done about 6 months ago. I was in the "reference range" on all essential and nonessential amino acids, including lysine and Arginine, although on the lower side of the ref. range on most.

except Isoleucine which was very low -- undetectable.

I do eat good quality protein every day in the evening, sometimes not as much as would probably be ideal, but with PD that's a bit complicated as you all know 😜.

Any thoughts? I need to look into this -- maybe need supplementation of isoleucine?

rescuema profile image
rescuema in reply to rebtar

"What does it mean if your Isoleucine (Plasma) result is too low? – Low BCAAs are an indication of chronic depletion from low protein intake, poor digestion, or increased utilization from chronic over-exercising. – Studies have shown that low levels of isoleucine in plasma indicate an increased need for niacin."healthmatters.io/understand....

rebtar profile image
rebtar in reply to rescuema

Thanks for your reply... The odd thing is it's only the Isoleucine that's low, and it's n/d -- not detectable. The other BCAA's are within the reference range. I don't think I over-exercise. I can add some more evening protein but my intake while on the low side is I think sufficient. I just added Niacin (nicotinamide) back into my supplements a week ago. Maybe that will help. And I take digestive enzymes -- adding some HCL again to help with digestion.

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to rebtar

Zinc deficiency can cause low isoleucine and other BCAAs.

Art

rebtar profile image
rebtar in reply to chartist

When I did the test my zinc was a bit low and I've increased that. So after taking niacin for a while I'll re-test aminos and see if there's an improvement. I still find it odd that the isoleucine would be not detectable and the other BCAAs in the reference range.

rescuema profile image
rescuema in reply to rebtar

If your leucine level was normal, it's possible you may have a genetic defect associated with isoleucine.

"Isoleucine deficiency is most common in older people and can lead to the weakening and wasting of muscle, and tremors. "

news-medical.net/life-scien...

Also applicable to your history of depression -

"Notably, in our investigation, l-isoleucine and l-leucine were two essential amino acids that emerged as predictors of moderate depressive symptoms. l-Isoleucine is an essential amino acid that the body cannot manufacture, so it must be obtained through the diet...The moderate depressive symptoms group of elderly women analyzed here had less l-isoleucine and less l-leucine, suggesting deficits in protein synthesis and brain energy metabolism...

One study revealed that patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder and major depression showed low levels of leucine and isoleucine, and these amino acids were negatively correlated with depressive scores"

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

rebtar profile image
rebtar in reply to rescuema

Wow -- thank you for that! I wonder if I have a genetic defect, if supplementation would be helpful? Is the only way to find out to try, and re-test?

rescuema profile image
rescuema in reply to rebtar

If I were you, I would've tried supplementation upon hearing "not detectable." Probably the quickest way to find out if it helps you.

Sydney75 profile image
Sydney75 in reply to rebtar

Good idea to test amino acids, we have done a micronutrient panel 2 years ago that initally showed very low choline, D, and B5. Supplemented and retested in a year, D was hard to bring up for some reason, switched to D3/K2 liposomal and we get sun in Florida. I will ask about a test that looks at amino acids. I had been giving HWP a good bit of teas and his oxalates were very high (urine test) so we had to cut back. We also added digestive enzymes to help with the intense faitigue that sometimes came over him after meals.

rebtar profile image
rebtar in reply to Sydney75

It took me several years to bring my D levels up.

I have taken Lysine (along with vitamin C and bioflavonoids) for years to prevent the Herpes simplex type 1 virus that causes cold sores.

Was there any reason given why the lysine increased in AD? Could it possibly increase also with Parkinson's?

If you are already benefiting from Benfotimine is there a way to check if it is affecting your lysine levels? My husband who has PD was really considering taking it.

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to Trailing

The study said Ben caused a 10 fold decrease in lysine levels.park_bear gave a list of foods that contain large amounts of lysine higher up in this thread. Yogurt was high on the list.

I didn't see a reason given for the lysine increase in the study.

PwP generally have lower lysine levels and Ben is likely to contribute to the decreased lysine level. The list p_b put up may help .

Art

Gigi216 profile image
Gigi216 in reply to Trailing

My husband used to get cold sores every few months. I found this study that HSV-1 worsens covid. ccforum.biomedcentral.com/a...

rescuema profile image
rescuema in reply to Trailing

“Was there any reason given why the lysine increased in AD? “Yes, thiamine deficiency.

Lysine helps lungs in this study sciencedirect.com/science/a...

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to Gigi216

Thank You for that, Gigi, I was not aware that Lysine had such a multitude of positive health effects! Very interesting!

Art

Gigi216 profile image
Gigi216 in reply to chartist

Very welcome! It raises glutathione too!

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to Gigi216

Even better! I guess I will be adding L-Lysine to my arsenal against Covid-19!

Art

Gigi216 profile image
Gigi216 in reply to chartist

I just took some 😃

I've seen some mention (but no scientific studies) that taking lysine with Cannabis can cause an interaction. I didn't see anything conclusive, but it's best to be cautious...