Alpha-synuclein glycation and anti-diabet... - Cure Parkinson's

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Alpha-synuclein glycation and anti-diabetic agents in Parkinson’s

Gigi216 profile image

content.iospress.com/articl...

19 Replies

Interesting. Glycation also plays a major role in cardiovascular disease.

Gigi216 profile image
Gigi216 in reply to park_bear

Yes it increases oxidative stress and development of atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction, unfortunately I do love sugar I gotta find a way to lower it!

Gigi216 profile image
Gigi216 in reply to park_bear

Resveratrol and several other things lower AGES I suppose if I consume sugar make sure I take something that blocks or decreases glycation, sigh, sugar is difficult to give up, I did in my 20’s not a drop of sugar for several years but then boy when I started eating it I made up for lost time

park_bear profile image
park_bear in reply to Gigi216

I love sugar too. Fortunately I find fat to be even more satisfying. My writings on the subject, with journal references:

Sugar, Fat And Cardiovascular Disease

tinyurl.com/y5cfmygz

A Tale Of Two Studies Leads To A Deeper Understanding Of Cardiovascular Disease

tinyurl.com/y6agl45j

Do eggs make cardiovascular disease better or worse? What is the root cause of cardiovascular disease anyway? Let us find out.

Gigi216 profile image
Gigi216 in reply to park_bear

Great articles!! I love fat too! I eat lots of butter in my soups I eat and heavy cream in my coffee! I am in complete agreement with your writings!

park_bear profile image
park_bear in reply to Gigi216

For best results also include some unsaturated fats in your diet as well. I enjoy flaxseed oil as well as tree nuts and salmon.

Gigi216 profile image
Gigi216 in reply to park_bear

Thanks!! I can easily drizzle flaxseed oil on my soups I make because of my dysphagia! Great to get a complete picture of what is needed to stay balanced and healthy!

JAS9 profile image
JAS9 in reply to park_bear

Flaxseed oil is a great idea (lots of omega 3) if you have a local source, keep it in an air-tight container, and refrigerate it. Otherwise it, like all oils, will go rancid very quickly. I buy whole flaxseeds (which last a very long time, even unrefrigerated) and grind some every week. Kept cold and in an air-tight container, ground flaxseed doesn't go bad in a week. It tastes great, too! Plus, you get ALL of its nutrients (some fight cancer) and fiber to help you avoid (or improve) your gut health.

park_bear profile image
park_bear in reply to JAS9

Agreed flaxseed oil goes rancid very easily. I buy from a source that keeps it chilled at all times including during transport, and freeze any not in the process of being used.

Thanks for commentary about using flaxseeds.

Gigi216 profile image
Gigi216 in reply to park_bear

Eggs are a favorite and I miss them immensely because of my dysphagia. I especially love fried eggs

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to Gigi216

One of the many reasons I take high dose melatonin is to help protect against oxidative stress (OS), inflammation and AGEs which are all elevated in psoriasis as well as PD. Psoriasis is also a risk factor for Cardiovascular Disease(CVD) as is PD, and melatonin is protective against CVD also. AGEs increase oxidative stress and inflammation and do damage to the gut microbiome while melatonin works against AGEs negative effects and lowers OS and inflammation as well as has protective effects for the gut microbiome.

You are cutting right into the core of this Gigi!

Art

JAS9 profile image
JAS9 in reply to park_bear

In general, anything that affects the arteries to the heart will also affect the arteries to the brain and those to your lower back.

Despe profile image
Despe in reply to JAS9

Massive doses of Vitamin C until bowel intolerance for your arteries. :)

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to JAS9

Melatonin may be quite useful for atherosclerosis :

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

Melatonin is also synergistic with the vitamin C that Despe mentioned!

Art

I see this "conflict" between high fat vs sugar a lot, and it's really not what most of us should be focused on. Fiber is what we all need more than anything. Highly processed food is the villain here because that's what removes nutrients and especially fiber from our food. So, consume plenty of carbs as long as they're not overly processed, because as long as the sugars are attached to fiber, your upper gut won't process them and you'll be feeding the good bacteria in your lower intestine! And/or consume lots of oils if you like, as long as they're healthy oils; not processed, burned, or rancid. Your omega 3 and omega 6 ratio is also important to be aware of.

How does eating more fiber help us PWP? With so little fiber in our diet, the good bacteria in your lower gut starve. All of the processed food (the unbound fats, oils, and sugars) all get consumed, higher-up. When the bacteria in your lower gut are starving, they don't produce the short-chain fatty acids that are needed to keep your gut repaired, Instead, they actually begin to eat away at your gut's protective barrier. For this and other great info, here's a quote from an absolutely fantastic broadcast that IMO everyone (especially PWP) should listen to. I hope this quote (about turmeric) piques your interest because she has so much more than this to say (especially about fiber and circadian rhythm). Here, she talks about aromatic turmerone.

"It (turmeric) has something in it called "aromatic turmerone", which has a different function... The aromatic turmerone has been shown in studies to actually, in the brain, increase neural stem cells. So, more stem cells in the brain to make more neurons. So it actually increases neural stem cells to, what's called "differentiate", which just means these stem cells become neurons. To increase - dramatically increase - the number of neurons..."

To hear more about the quote, jump to timestamp 00:58:30.

To hear more from this doctor (she talks about circadian rhythms, gut health, etc), jump to 00:44:10.

Or just listen to the entire broadcast, which includes interviews of other fantastic doctors.

youtu.be/yjeS0Q-KDvc

park_bear profile image
park_bear in reply to JAS9

Fiber is fine but high carb consumption is definitely a problem - associated with increased cardiovascular disease and overall increased mortality. See the links I posted above for more detail.

Adverse effects of excess carbohydrate consumption
JAS9 profile image
JAS9 in reply to park_bear

Dietary Carbohydrate Intake and Mortality

A prospective cohort study and meta-analysis

Published in The Lancet Public Health in 2018

Explains that many people replace highly processed carbs with animal protein and animal fats. Yes, giving up a sugary soft drink is great, but replacing it with fried lard is probably not. This study suggests that people can live healthier and longer if they replace highly processed carbs with low-processed proteins, oils, and, yes, carbs from plants.

I'll look at some of what you suggest. My mind isn't a closed book on this. Close, but not quite. I'm probably never going to look at a blueberry and think it's evil.

park_bear profile image
park_bear in reply to JAS9

High temperature cooking, particularly fried fatty meat, is also part of the problem. I certainly do not advocate for that and wrote about it here:

A Tale Of Two Studies Leads To A Deeper Understanding Of Cardiovascular Disease tinyurl.com/y6agl45j

I wrote about the virtues of nuts here: tinyurl.com/xcyaj9am

JAS9 profile image
JAS9 in reply to park_bear

Agreed, and I'm not a fan of eating just raw fruit, for instance. Common sense! So I think we're more or less on the same page on 90+% of this.