Hospital patients are more likely to die at weekends but seven-day rosters are no panacea

Hospital patients are more likely to die at weekends but seven-day rosters are no panacea

"If you are admitted to a hospital on the weekend, you have a higher chance of dying than if you are admitted during the week. This is known as the “weekend effect”.

Evidence from the United Kingdom suggests an 11-16% increased risk of death for patients admitted on weekends, mostly driven by emergency admissions. This effect has also been found in the United States and Australia, among Queenslanders admitted for heart attacks.

But while seven-day rosters for doctors and nurses have been touted as a solution to this problem in the UK, the evidence suggests it’s a little more complicated." Peter Sivey, Senior Lecturer, Department of Economics and Finance at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia looks into what causes the “weekend effect” and at the findings of cost effectiveness studies from the UK's National Health Service (NHS), where NHS is taking steps towards implementing seven-day services in England:

Unfortunately with CLL, we are more likely to need urgent admittance to hospital, particularly during or after treatment, but there is much we can do to minimise that likelihood. We also need to recognise that for some conditions, going to hospital, even on a weekend, is far better for our health than staying home. There is much on this site and the sites below by which you can improve your awareness of your health risks of living with CLL. The first step is to understand your stage with CLL and what specific risks you have, as we are all different. Find out from your specialist how CLL has impacted your body and what to watch out for. This is particularly important while you are undergoing treatment and even more so if it is chemoimmunotherapy.

Pinned posts - on the right hand side:

Other CLL sites:

Many more international resources:



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