AUK unoffical guide to nebulisers

It has dawned on me that from time to time people come on here asking about which nebuliser they should buy perhaps we should do an un-offical guide rating nebulisers from 1-5, looking at speed, portability, maintenance, cost, cost of spares etc as a serial neb collector it would be intersting to see how they al compair, for example I have a 2 omron micros, 1 omron compressor, 2 medix's ones and 2 philips ones. I tend to use the omron compressor as a my by the bed work horse, my omron micro air goes everywhere with me but I have a philips one in the car just in case, and the medix ones gathering dust in the wardrobe. There could be others I might have more that I have forgotten about too. Or better still how about AUK actually doing positive for the more severe asthmatics and doing a ""which"" type guide, nebulisers are expensive to buy and advice can be conflicting other charities do ""which"" type guides so I can't see it being an issue. Seriously being told you have a condition that you need a machine to help you but you have to buy one it would be a good idea if people had somewhere to start.

Bex

9 Replies

oldestnewest
  • I like this idea as the first one i bought was a disaster! I now have a micro air omron and it fantastic to take out and about.

    PLumie

  • Six months ago I got a Respironics AAD I-neb, the most incredible device & as I believe they are expensive I am extremely fortunate to have it (arranged by consultant). I mainly had it for nebbing antibiotics but also for salbutamol and saline (not hypertonic saline tho). It comes with a computer chip which lasts for 60 sessions and every box of drugs contains a new chip. The company sent a lovely guy round to my house to show me how to use it & they have a telephone helpline for problems or queries or to send you a new chip if needed. The i-neb is brilliant, really quick (about 1 minute), light and only about 10cm so highly portable. I love it!

    I also have a Pari Turbo-boy which I now use just for nebulising larger volumes, and (like Bex) an old Medix literally gathering dust in the wardrobe . . . somewhere

  • sorry, ignore that

    I've reread your post bex and see you started it to advise people buying their own nebulisers, in which case my showing off about my lovely i-neb may be very annoying to others, as I was given the impression it's very expensive. I hadn't really thought that some people have to buy their own nebulisers. Why that is I can't understand - I know some people are discouraged from using nebs but if your con says you need one you shouldn't have to pay. I didn't have to pay for the turbo-boy either so why should others pay?

  • Bex,

    this is a good idea. the world of nebs- there are so mnay different types makes models and all sorts. It is a bit of a maze tryign to navigate your way round it and where to buy nebs from.

    I personally have always used evergreen as they are very helpful.

    I have had afew nebs in my time. My personal favourite is one that my friends often mistake for a sandwich toaster- the old portaneb. it is great and lasted for ages but it eventually gave up the ghost. I also have a omron comp air for back up. I have a omron microair for out and about and also a freeway elite aswell. I have a medix from the hospital which I use as my work horse neb jsut now. it is brilliant but very noisy!!!!

    Olive

  • I can also recommend the Omron Micro Air. I bought this early 2008 to replace my old 'portable' neb. It's a truly amazing little machine.

    Runs on AA batteries so I don't worry about charging (as I did with old one)

    It's silent! My little boy hates the noise my Medix neb makes (as do I) and finds the Omron less alarming to see me use. It's also perfect at night as doesn't wake anyone.

    You can use with a mask or mouth piece (personally only use masks for nebs so can't vouch for mouth piece)

    The only downside of this model (but very minor) is on the occassions where I'm very poorly it's hard for me to use as it needs to be held + is a bit fiddly if you're rushing or shaky.

    It really is wonderful though and has transformed my life enormously. I wish I could have had one like this as a kid.

    The Medix one I have is a good 10-15 years old and has served me well but is used less these days. It holds a charge + can also be plugged into car cigarette lighter. Never had problems sourcing spare parts (filter etc) for it.

    It is v bulky+heavy, especially compared to my Omron but is very robust. Easy to use and to clean+maintain. The Omron is more fiddly to clean.

  • Like Bex I too have an array of nebulisers all Omron. My heavy duty one has just broken after 10 years

    but am waiting for an assessment by the Community Respiratory Nurses who will provide and maintain a new one for free!. I have a travel omron which has a battery as well mains and recently bought the

    Omron micro air which is excellent as it's discrete and goes everywhere with me. The only problem I've found with the travel/handheld nebs is that they can't cope with the combination of ventolin/atrovent so have to do back to back. I use a company called Evergreen when buying nebulisers and oximeter as they deliver quickly and are extremely helpful.

  • I too like the Omron MicroAir as it is so small and easily fits in my handbag. Only drawback for me is that I like to be ""hands free"" when nebbing so bit annoying that you have to hold the MicroAir all the time you are using it. Have tried other ""hands free"" models like the respironics Micro Elite but is not as good as it uses it own battery which needs to be recharged and a full charge doesn't last very long. I like the fact that the Omron uses two AA batteries so if you have an emergency and batteries are flat at least you can pop into a shop and pick up new batteries easily. I have been caught out recently becuase I have been keeping quite well and not needed to use my portable neb when out. however, when i did come to use it, the batteries had gone flat while it was in my handbag and so I had to pop in to the nearest supermarket to get batteries to quickly avoid my attack getting worse.!ICouldn't have done this with the Respironics. If the respironics MicroElite loses charge you need to find a socket to charge it in or you are in trouble! I do lots of walking outdoors so sockets to charge nebs aren't usually available in an emergency. Would really like to see a neb that's just like the Omron MicroAir but that has a hands free option to it.

  • I too have an Omron! Cost these days around £99 (Or the medix version is £79 on Evergreens) Spare meshes are around £32 - worth having a spare just in case.

    I always keep some spare normal bateries with it as well as the rechargeables.

    Very light weight though not too good for real humdingers where you don't have the energy to hold it.

    I also have a Profile / Respironics Freeway elite small compressor for my work horse. Has battery pack etc Can whack the antibiotic system on it too.

    Mirco Elite, diddy thing for going away if I have room for another neb. Tubing a bit stiff on it but I have adapted it to use normal tubing and system 22 neb mask etc using a 360 double ended male adaptor ( asked BOC O2 peeps for one!) Battery pack included

    I also have in a drawer, and it still works on mains, a Medix Sonix, one of the first ever Ultrasonic nebs. Should use it more really, though i don't have any elephant tubing for it to use it hands free when watching TV. It was a bit cumbersom with wires and battery packs etc mains base unit etc but it does neb faster than the Omron!

    Overall, at home I use compressor nebs as they can be quickly washed etc

    Omron fab when out and about, though needs abit more care with the cleaning etc

    Kate

  • Omron Micro Air, well most of the time I love it, it's silent and easier to carry around than my portable freeway, it has never let me down in the five years I have had it, and not had to worry about service costs with it. The downside, like others say it's not hands free, and I do like to be able to fiddle about and the Omron Micro Air does limit that. The price is good, costing around £80 these days though I paid the £200 when they first came out.

    In the past I have had the Medix Traveller, noisy and bulky, so not really great if you need to move it about the place.

    I have also had the Medix Sonix, one of the first ultrasonics, my first one was great, but when the died I bought a second one, and that was awful as were my experiences of Clement Clark who made it.

    MY work horse has to be the Freeway by Phillips Resporonics, despite changes in the company ownership over the years, the customer service has always been excellent. I have one workhorse Freeway light that is 15 years old and a newer one of about 5 years. They are middle of the range in cost at about £165, but find this is about right has my experiences are that you get what you pay for. And in this case it as always been reliability and excellent customer service.

    PS Excellent idea Bex because I can't remember how many times I have replied to this kind of question on here.

You may also like...