Just wondered whether anyone else is a runner and manages to keep it up in spite of their asthma? Before my asthma became worse and I had a flare up (which I've never fully got back under control as yet) in 2010, I ran 10k regularly. I wasn't the fastest by any means but I could run and my breathing didn't hamper me as long as I took plenty of reliever before hand. When I initially began running my asthma actually improved.

Now I am trying to get back into running and it is soooo hard! Part of that is my general fitness but a lot of it is the need to control my asthma symptoms during and after my run, and I am becoming anxious about trying because I don't want to cause another flare up.

How do people manage to run or do other strenuous physical activity and keep their asthma under control at the same time? Any advice?!

6 Replies

  • i like you loved running but i too find it a struggle to get into it and run again what i found helep me was easing into things and started off running small amounts then building up maybe this wil help you ?? hope things get sorted out

    Amy xxx

  • Used to be a swimmer when younger (my main sport), runner (cross country, 800m and 1600m) and biathlon. However at the time only had excercise induced asthma and never got control of it just accepted that I would always have attacks during training and would frequently have to stop and take reliever repeatedly throughout the sessions and before training. Asthma was always worse when running before a swim, not sure why though? Unfortunately now had to give them up because of asthma and allergies.

  • I used to be a runner too! At the moment I only swim, infact I was going to post a similar question about exercising at the moment. My problem is that I can swim slowly and have had success in increasing the total distance (woo hoo!) but going a bit faster is a bit of a disaster (yesterday was one of those days).

    I was just chatting to my dad about this - he is a GP and used to do lots of competitive sport. His advice for my swimming was to slowly build up by doing say one 200m slightly faster than normal.

    What are you doing at the moment, if you don't mind me asking? Do you do any other exercise at all?

    I can understand why you are a bit scared but why do you think it will cause a flare up? Do you find the after effects last for say more than the rest of the day and possibly the next?

    I guess your dr knows about it, but do you know if any of the GPs at your surgery are into sport, because it might be worth having a chat to them about it. I used to see my old GP in the swimming pool!

    Finally good luck and I hope you get somewhere! I find it doesn't really 'improve' my asthma in terms of peak flows etc but it does mean I notice the symptoms a bit less, and where previously a peak flow of say 280 would make me walk around slowly and breathless I can now walk normal speed but get out of breath.

    Take care


  • hey - i'm a rugby player and also a runner, and after a big flare up its hard to 'trust' your lungs into not letting you down. plenty of reliever before training and competing, and taking it whereever possible when i need it. make sure people are aware and try not to let it beat you. i know its hard and after a big flare up in january it still worries me at time. i think its just building yourself up slowly and regularly.

    good luck :)

  • Hell yeh I run, and with my asthma as severe as it is I shouldn't be able, I also cycle and swim huge distances and as far as asthma is concerened it can just F**k off because I'm not stopping, I will continue to do what I want and if it kills me doing it then it does, and the doc agreed with that approach, besides physical activity is great for your lungs, makes them stronger and the oxygen deficit increases the CO2 content within which is a natural bronchial dilator.

  • woody-som

    unfortunately many people would LOVE to be able to take exercise in their stride, but alot cannot, i'm glad for you, and thankfully when exercising i'm not too bad, but other's aren't quite as lucky, so pushing it 'till it kills you' could be easier than for others...

    don't wish your life away, a few of us have experienced the loss of a life through asthma attacks, life is precious, just take it a bit easy when exercising.

    dont overdue it :)

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