1st day after Ablation for AVNRT: This forum... - AF Association

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1st day after Ablation for AVNRT

BorgUK1of9
BorgUK1of9

This forum has been useful for pointers for the last 18 months while dealing with my SVT which it seems I have had for many years but was misdiagnosed by my local GP's as stress or panic attacks.

I had my RT ablation yesterday and just wanted to hand onto some pointers for those others hovering around wondering what to expect.

Firstly its not as bad as your mind thinks its going to be, yes you do feel a lot of it but the sedation as others have pointed out really helps. However from reading the forums the one thing I picked up on was the difference in sedation levels. I made it clear to my nurse that I wanted to be out when they ablated, I understood that during the EP I would be conscious of everything but I asked to make sure I was a sedated during that bit as much as they could. This made all the difference compared to my fellow patients who were having the same done in the other 3 Cath labs. One was not sedated enough and felt a lot more than he should when we swapped war stories afterwards.

Secondly again I will reiterate, the guys in the cath labs know what they are doing, 4-5 ablations a day while also inserting stents and fitting pacemakers. The QE Birmingham labs do 65 ops a day, your in safe hands so don't worry, for you its scary but for them its a very run of the mill procedure.

Thirdly, rest as much as you can after, you will feel weak, you will feel tired. I am signed off unfit for work for 2 weeks and 2 weeks I am taking.

I am finally of the Bisoprolol, I feel better already.

Long term medication, don't do it, bite the bullet and get ablated, the weight lifts from your shoulders.

14 Replies
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Good to hear and great advice may the force be with you

And with you

Hidden
Hidden

Useful observations. Yes, I think getting to the hospital and feeling the place is dealing all the time with what is a big thing to every patient helps to put it all into perspective.

Great to give up your Bisoprolol!

BorgUK1of9
BorgUK1of9
in reply to Hidden

Bisoprolol, I am not going to miss feeling tired all the time especially after a hard day when out on site and not in the office. The wife unhappy that I am in bed fast asleep before 9pm because of it and the SVT.

Hidden
Hidden
in reply to BorgUK1of9

I've never taken Bisoprolol and feel I have had a lucky escape. I don't much like the sound of it!

Shcldavies
Shcldavies
in reply to Hidden

Please do not write Bisoprolol off, it is one of the safest drugs for our condition, if not the safest. Yes it can have a bad effect on some but the vast majority have few if any side effects. It is not effective in some srythmias but if thr Doc thinks it would be good for you then it is well worth trying it. Especially when many other drugs may have far more sinister side effects.

Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Shcldavies

I am merely saying that it does not appeal to me much as one frequently sees comments about wading through treacle. Bisoprolol is clearly the doctors' first choice and doubtless has, as you say, many benefits.

My doctors have never suggested it would be appropriate for me. I have been taking Atenolol since 2002.

Really good advice. I haven't had an ablation but had an extremely uncomfortable colonoscopy a couple of years ago. When I saw the consultant afterwards, (one of his team did the procedure) he was very sympathetic, looked at my notes and said I could have had more sedation, I had had the minimum. I made a mental note to talk about adequate sedation levels before any procedure in future.

Thank you so much for posting this, I’m having mine on Monday and as much as I’m trying to not succumb to fear I’m starting struggle a bit. I will definitely ask for the maximum sedation 🥴

Really happy for you that you are through the other side and I hope your recovery goes really smoothly.

Take good care 😊

Its natural to be scared but keep yourself distracted and don't dwell on anything. As frightening as walking into the cath lab is you will see how everyone operates like clockwork and knows what they are doing. Seeing this you will know that your in safe hands, its reassuring. Its over quicker than you realise thanks to the sedation then just rest is the key.

Thank you for the tips 😊

Did it take a long time? I’m scared of my heart being put into svt and afib during the procedure and I’m scared of the recovery and my heart feeling worse. I’ve read the fact sheet and I’ve been trying to have really low expectations so that if I feel rotten afterwards I won’t be too scared or disappointed but I’m dreading it.

Not rotten at all. You will feel fine until you move then you will feel weak and tired. Listen to your body and take the rest you need. The guy in the next bed on my ward was in for his OP because he didn't rest after ablation and was manual handling the week after.

Congratulations on your successful ablation. I too had mine at the QE six weeks ago. All the staff there were amazing. Who did yours? Just rest now as much as you can. I’m still getting chest pain six weeks later so don’t do too Much too soon. Good luck in your recovery

BorgUK1of9
BorgUK1of9
in reply to LMor

I can't remember the Doctor, he was really nice. I had Tasha sedating me and Joe in post OP all the rest was a sedated blur. I felt safe and apparently I was very chilled patient. Except when they rammed the catheter into my leg. I think they had some trouble, my veins are all deep.

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