Interesting new piece of research - AF Association

AF Association
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Interesting new piece of research

Ianc2
Ianc2
17 Replies

The University of Glasgow assessed the BMI and body fat of 300,000 middle-aged Britons in relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD). In every measurement, they found the risk of illnesses such as heart attack and stroke increased the fatter a person was. ( Read more: dailymail.co.uk/health/arti... .)

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BobD
BobDVolunteer

Oh what a surprise! We know that anything over 25 presents a risk with AF. and that reducing to that level often improves QOL in those with it.

4 likes
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Ianc2
Ianc2
in reply to BobD

Yes - but look at the number of people taking part in the survey - 300,000 middle aged people - a sizeable bunch of people. The more hard evidence like this that can be gathered the better. It is not a theory, or a hunch, or an opinion.

It is my belief that the more hard facts that can be marshalled (from as many sources as possible) the better. Perhaps the first question for any newcomers to this site should be

"Are you overweight and are you willing to do anything about it"?

4 likes
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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to BobD

My thoughts exactly. It's hardly rocket science. Obvious that carrying excess weight is no good for anyone, heart problems or not. I'm including myself here but it is an ongoing struggle.

5 likes
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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to BobD

IMO whoever wrangled the funds to do that study is a smart cookie. There is already so much research to support the relationships between illnesses and overweight I'm surprised anyone would be given grant money to confirm known statistics. JMO.

3 likes
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rosyG

Whilst this seems obvious, it’s not so long ago that people were arguing on this site , protesting that it wouldn’t be fair if they were made to diet as they are already stressed from their AF. Similar arguments re alcohol!!! There was a study done in a small African country where BMI s were below what we consider healthy and AF never occurred

6 likes
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Boombiddy
Boombiddy
in reply to rosyG

Hiya,

I have to say, I have known a few people with low bmi, who didn’t smoke or drink and walked miles every day, just die suddenly in their 50's, pathology lab unable to determine cause of death..

Were the low bmi population in the country you mention old, middle aged, or young or a mix? What was considered normal bmi? What is their life expectancy compared to the UK?

Bmi below normal may just mean you die of something else.

2 likes
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Boombiddy
Boombiddy
in reply to Boombiddy

This bit is optional as may be leading off topic. Is for argument's sake:

The type of fats eaten, for example, whatever your bmi, may cause ill health, but if we focus only on the amounts we will miss that.

Health is politically defined, so is nutrition. There is little incentive to (for example) identify vitamin k2 as important for vascular health, if farming methods have to change to restore k2 to the diet. Beef would have to be grass fed. So I suspect that official knowledge has been focused around what can be managed inexpensively. If this is true, then I am not sure adhering to the 'official' diet would promote good health in the long run. In any case, there is no diet that can be digested well by everyone, given the diversity of people's digestion, even healthy individuals. Then there is low FODMAP, coeliac, intolerances, allergies, reduced gut flora diversity and microbiome,... Inherited disorders of connective tissues such as Ehlers Danlos, Marfan etc. where protein production is faulty and we are not sure protein digestion is not at fault.... so it could be very difficult to have One Diet to Rule Them All...

.

4 likes
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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Boombiddy

Hi Boomdiddy. You are so on target in my book. And we all know statistics and studies can go in whatever direction the financial backers wish. Unfortunately 'money rules' is good for many. Esp in the US. But not for the patients. What's wrong with this picture?

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Ianc2
Ianc2
in reply to Boombiddy

The survey was carried out across 300,000 middle aged people in the UK, probably using a very large databank ( Biobank? ) that was set up in UK to help improve medical outcomes.

I think normal BMI ranges are well established and the method was established initially by an American Insurance company to assess risk when it came to working out premiums.

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Boombiddy
Boombiddy
in reply to Ianc2

Hi, thanks for answering, but the question I asked re. a study was in response to Rosie's reply, where she said "There was a study done in a small African country where BMI s were below what we consider healthy and AF never occurred". I did not assume that normal bmi in that country would be normal here, as I do not know.

I do wonder if the reasons for a higher bmi are always the same everywhere and always consistent. Especially because some newer research on the gut microbiome suggests that the content and diversity or otherwise of the gut flora influence body mass.

Much of what I have said or asked here is for argument's sake, because it has sometimes been the case that when a theory has been accepted quickly, further work done on it does not make it into the news and refinements of the theory are not picked up and acted on. This is what happened with the calorie theory, and this may be the reason why so many people on calorie-restricted diets have not had success. The advice on fats from the 1990's onward was based on faulty analysis of the research data but it was considered irrefutable for long enough to adversely affect the diet here and in the US. In addition the fructose syrup which replaced it in most foods in the US is causing health problems and yet this is not being addressed.

Although I broadly agree with keeping down one's weight to a sensible level, I would not like to see anyone made to do a diet in which they cannot have confidence.

I would not have confidence in a diet born in the totalising attitude that says all we know now about the body, body mass and health is all there is to know.

1 like
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Andyc934
Andyc934
in reply to rosyG

Hi do you know where the study was done ?

Andy

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BobD
BobDVolunteer

Rosy best to just feel sorry for such people. There WILL come a time when ablation will be refused to people who are grossly over weight on the basis that it is unlikely to be of any help, especially long term. The same argument applies regarding people addicted to over exercise.

It is easy to look back from our more gentle age and see how we have contributed to our own conditions with the benefit of 20 20 hindsight but not always so easy to explain the folly to others.

3 likes
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Ianc2
Ianc2
in reply to BobD

I accept your argument about over exercise. Most professional sportsmen seem to pack it in at about 35 but how do you explain to exercise addicts that they are getting older and that what they are doing may be harmful?

I think its all a wonderful rats nest caused by people sitting typing away on a computer, with feet up drinking coffee and scoffing cakes. Got to go now, my wife keeps reminding me about a job I promised to do 3 months ago. It's a hard life

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BobD
BobDVolunteer
in reply to Ianc2

Drinking coffee if you have AF???? You must be mad.

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Ianc2
Ianc2
in reply to BobD

decaf coffee, 5 grains per mug

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grussell49
grussell49
in reply to BobD

And also to the chemical ridden food that we are being fed....I try organic as much as possible but living on SS it’s a struggle....Sugar is gonna kill us all 🤨

1 like
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rosyG
rosyG
in reply to BobD

Yes I would do lots differently but a bit late now!!

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