AF Association

Mild exercise or rest up

Having a session of uncomfortable AF, take Apixabam and Sotalol, but wondered what peeps do to help, a bit of exercise or just rest up. I get very breathless especially on standing, so not tried exercise as yet.

My sessions last usually 3 days, this one probably triggered by Christmas which was when my late wife's cancer started.

Trying Magnesiun for a month but no real benefit as yet.

Any suggestions?

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If an episode is particularly bad then resting is essential. I do not have a rate problem, just an erratic rhythm and episodes are mild since my ablation. I try to carry on as normal but physical jerks would never be an option. If I were breathless then I would most definitely rest.

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I rest up as much as possible because I am very unfit and once when I tried to ignore my AF I was rewarded with three days in hospital because of chest pain. I would think if you get very breathless then trying to exercise would be asking for trouble but I know fit people can sometimes convert by exercising. Recently when I had a different arrhythmia I found I could stop it temporarily by raising my heart rate, which was interesting but not very helpful.

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Thanks Buffafly, pulse is a bit high so yes agree. Thanks.

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I'm not sure it makes any difference if you are not symptomatic and your rate is below 100. Some people with vagal AF say they can stop an episode by exercising.

I used to take an extra Sotalol when my PAF was infrequent. Now I have episodes every day, I just carry on as usual, though I have stopped going to the gym because it seems to make them last longer.

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Thanks Badger, rate fluctuates rather a lot, sometimes below 90, other times 120.

Not sure what you mean when you say symptomatic.

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Most would define symptomatic AF as being associated with chest pain, breathlessness or faintness. This often results in a trip to casualty.

Anxiety due to AF is a very common symptom which does not by itself require urgent attention unless extreme.

Tiredness is universal after a while. Palpitations are also common though some with PAF are unaware, as are many with permanent AF

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Also peeing a lot and/or sickness and diarrhoea for some of us....

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Hi Shorttail, understandably Christmas is a stressful time for you. I'm no medic, but the general view I've heard expressed is that mild exercise is OK as long as you listen to your body and stop when it tells you to. Maybe nothing more strenuous than gentle walking or cycling on the flat to start with and always best to take your mobile phone!

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[Quote = ''Mild exercise or rest up''.....]

Hi Shortail :-) I do both, I have to take my dog out during bad episodes of P-AF I have no choice.

I rest when I can and do things to distract my mind from my AF but I also feel as long as I can actually walk, doing so without rushing while concentrating on slow deep breathing isn't going to make things worse and the fresh air and gentle exercise is good for my heart/lungs/mental well being.

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My EP says he has a patient in the SAS who is in permanent AF and functions fine. The EP suggested that when next in AF I try some heavy exercise that I could do when in SR to see if the AF had an effect. The result was that when in AF I lost about 10-20% of my ability to cycle up extremely steep hills. I am 67 and not that great a cyclist so decided that I would like to retain what fitness I had, and opted for an ablation.

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Nice reply, but I'm usually a bit breathless when in AF, heavy exercise would make me very nervous LOL

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best to listen to your body- but I would err on the safe side re exercise.

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And also keep well hydrated. Even if you are not peeing a lot, this seems to be a constant theme among us that hydration is important.

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I do pee a lot, but agree hydration is important otherwise pee can become strong and infection may follow.

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As an alternative to exercise I have plunged my forearms into very cold water. On occasions it has settled my Afib down. My thoughts are; If I can alter my body/blood temperature, then this goes through to the heart. This imo might just be enough to cause my heart to alter it's out of sync rhythm - it has worked for me. Not that I have done it yet - a cold shower/bath would possibly do the same quicker. I am not claiming that this is medical advice, however, it has worked for me.

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It takes a long time to build up your magnesium levels. Any supplement should be tried for three months at least to give it a chance to show it's full effect. I have heard that a year is better with magnesium. You may want to increase the amount you take, but never go so far as to cause diarrhea - that causes you to lose electrolytes eg magnesium, but also potassium etc, which will make the AF worse!

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Re Magnesium Taurate, I have no 'proof ' it is due to taking it for a few months (at the suggestion of Dr Gupta) it may be coincidence/medication/change in lifestyle but for whatever reason I am getting less episodes of AF, hardly any ectopic beats and the aches and pains in my legs and hips which kept me awake at night have largely gone.

So I am just going to carry on doing the things I am doing now and feeling grateful :-) .

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Thats interesting, I have had M.E. for many years and one of the worst aspects has been thigh muscle pain and weakness. Early days but my last episode of AF was a day shorter than usual, and the thigh pains seem to be easing too.

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