Confused

In was just diagnosed with DVT in 3 veins in my left leg and was given 30 days off work. The first specialist I saw told me to remain lying down with my leg elevated 90% of the time. The 2nd specialist I saw the next day told me to walk several times a day up to 40 minutes at one time. He also said to avoid sitting as much as possible because the main clot is in the groin area.

What is the best advice? Also how effective are the compression panythose? Is it really necessary to wear them all the time? I was given the full panythosebtype up to the waist and told. I had to wear them for at least 6 months.

Thanks

4 Replies

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  • Hi Pvrgirl, it's such a worrying time for you and conflicting advice isn't helpful. I had a DVT nearly 2 years ago and so far am doing OK. Maybe in the early days it's important to elevate the leg whenever possible particularly if you have much swelling. It's also important to take exercise as it's good for your circulation. I found a good source of advice was the nurses in the coagulation clinic, they see so many people and often have a bit more time to answer questions, don't be afraid to call and make an appointment or just ask for advice, it's what they are there for. As for the stockings, they really are important even if putting them on and off is a bit like wrestling a python that's trying to swallow your leg. It's not for ever and it's worth it to help you get back to normal. Good luck!

  • Thank you!

  • I have had a couple of DVTs over the past 2 years. I agree with the comments of Jaxta. I found the DVT nurse more helpful and more knowledgeable than the doctors/consultants Walking and other exercise is important and leg elevation when sedentary is also helpful. Do both! Yes wear the stockings because the evidence is that they help alleviate swelling and reduce the risk of PTS and the risk of another DVT. Just a word of caution on my comments. MY DVTs were in the lower leg, whereas at least one of your is higher up so this might make a difference to the appropriate treatment.

  • Thank you!

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