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Glatopa: FDA Approves Three-Times Weekly Dose

Glatopa: FDA Approves Three-Times Weekly Dose

Here is an excerpt from MSAA's article on this latest MS treatment news:

"On February 13, 2018, Sandoz, a Novartis division, announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Glatopa® (glatiramer acetate injection) at a three-times weekly 40-mg dose. This fully-substitutable generic version of Copaxone®, a disease-modifying therapy (DMT) approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), was initially approved at a 20-mg daily dose. Both dosing options are given via self-injection and will continue to be available to individuals taking the medication.

Copaxone was initially approved in 1996 as a daily 20-mg injection. A 40-mg dose of Copaxone injected three-times weekly was approved by the FDA in 2014. In 2015, Glatopa was approved as the first generic version of Copaxone, given at the original 20-mg daily dose. This most recent approval allows people to have the option of choosing a three-times weekly dose of Glatopa in place of the daily dose, depending on their preferences. In October 2017, Mylan’s generic version of Copaxone was approved at both doses."

For more on the new dose Glatopa, you can read MSAA's full news article here:

mymsaa.org/news/fda-approve...

Thank you,

- John, MSAA

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Thanks for the post. can't wait to read!!

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Thanks johnMSAA 😊

I'm still staying on copaxone tho! 😁

J🌠

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wish I could stay on copaxone as for me injections sting less with it, but in the last 3 years my insurance has switched me from copaxone to glatopa to copaxone to glatieramer. If this 3 day glatopa is less expensive than the glatiramer I sure they will be switching me again...

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I have heard that the 40mg sting more than the 20mg daily. Are you saying your 20mg Copaxone stings less than glatopa/generic?

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I have only been on the 40mg 3x a wk. And a shot is a shot they all sting! 😒😃😊

Ugh my insurance better not mess with it😡😐

J🌠

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I've heard the 20 is milder, which makes sense because the dose is less concentrated. But I can't have that because my skin flips out and I would run out of injection sites too fast.

I already had to change specialty pharmacies and now they will only deliver one month at a time, so I can't even potentially stockpile my brand shots to take during pregnancy 😂

Btw, how screwed would we all be during a zombie apocalypse! I'd probably just shoot myself as soon as the coffee ran out 😂

Hubby wants to discuss this news and what we will choose to do once our insurance hoses us. He's adorable, but really?! It's Valentine's Day, thanks for the romance MS 😂

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I was on 20mg for about 9 years and then 40 mg for the past 3 years. I feel no difference in either dose, but I think it is better for my skin to inject three times a week instead of 7x/wk.

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Why should it be up to the pharmacy? Your doctor should be able to indicate which medication to be on. My pharmacy sent out the Myelin version without any warning and my physician knew nothing about it. He rewrote the script and I brought the generic back to the pharmacy and they sent out the brand name.I was especially upset that no one included me in the decision to switch me. It is as if the patient doesn't count.

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Thanks for the update

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lois52 that doesn' sound good! Isn' it up to the Dr on what you take?😕😒

J 🌠

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Insurance substitutes with compatible generics whenever possible, and MD's have to write brand specific when needed, then the insurance has the option of denying payment because that brand is not covered. The exception is when the brand is very different and the pt can't take generic, and I can only think of a thyroid medication where this is the case and they will cover the payment.

Shhhh...don't tell my insurance there's a generic! 😂😵

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Uh-oh! While I'm stoked there is a more affordable option, I would like to not be pigeon holed by insurance into changing from Copaxone. Shared solutions told me it was not the same exact drug, and that the fillers are different. Maybe the generic filler is better for my skin type! But I wouldn't try it unless I was done with babies.

Thank you!

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Your secret is safe with me! That' for sure!🙈🙉🙊

J 🌠

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When I spoke to a nurse at Shared Solutions she said she could not comment on whether the two versions, brand or generic, were the same because she was employed by shared solutions who represents Copaxone. When I asked the pharmacist about the difference she said their was exactly no difference, even in the filler. She looked it up. However considering how non transparent the drug industry is, I am still skeptical. The pharmacy wanted me to take the generic kind until I had my doc write the brand name script (see my comment below.)

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Great information John! Thanks for keeping us up-to-date by sharing the many significant news items that you do!

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Great to hear 👍Anybody doing this 🤷🏼‍♂️and idea of price difference 🤷🏼‍♂️ My best friends wife has been on cops one for fifteen years and has co-pay🤷🏼‍♂️ 🐾🐶🐕🐩😉Ken

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I've been on Copaxone for just over 12 years. The pharmacy automatically sent me the Mylan's version in December, which I found upsetting as no one transparently told me this would happen. I returned it and my doctor send out a new prescription for the Brand Copaxone. My pharmacy was able to get the original Brand with in a day. Everyone has a different answer as to whether or not the two are exactly the same including fillers. My pharmacy says I get some kind of E discount with the Brand name so it is cheaper I go that route. I'm not sure that is really true either, but I've never had a reaction to the Brand name so why should I take a chance on an unknown generic brand? If I were able to get maybe a week or two weeks trial of the generic, I might consider it, but it just doesn't seem to work that way. What if I get one month's worth and it doesn't agree with me? Can I get a refund if I return the unused syringes? How likely is that? Much today's drug industry does not make rational sense to me. It seems to be all about politics and money.

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Hi John, Not sure what you question is, but as I wrote below I have been on Copaxone many years and I am doing well physically and have not had any major problems with Copaxone. I do have some skin atrophy on my thighs but is isn't terribly noticeable. I would for that reason like to go oral, but considering that Copaxone has none of the worrisome side effects (like liver disease) that pills and other DMTs have, I will stick with Copaxone until I have a reason not to.

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