Face warmers?

This may sound a bit mad, but I've seen a few people with something over their face that looked a bit like a small, but securely fixed, scarf (a bit like a woolly surgical mask!).

Does anyone have any idea what they are or where I would find one? I always get fed up of constantly holding my scarf over my mouth to keep the cold air out of my lungs, I can never get it to stay on it's own!

15 Replies

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  • How about something like this:

    whipperleys.co.uk/acatalog/...

    note: may have to fix a gap in 'knitted' if copying & pasting add

    or a ninja mask like this...

    cgi.ebay.co.uk/Motogp-moto-...

  • Ooh! That's it! The ninja mask. I shall have to get me one, although I shall wrap a scarf round too, they do make people look a bit threatening if they're walking round town in them!

    Thank you from me & my lungs!

  • Have you seen the buff headware thing? Its a bit like a more modern snood. Can be worn aroung the neck and also up around the face, or up over the head. Think can be found in outdoor pursuit shops or buffshop.co.uk. Theres loads of different colours and doesnt look as scary as the masks! Have just ordered one so will let you know if any good. Ive got a respo mask to wear for all my allergies when out and about. Thought this would be better for winter and prehaps save a few people from walking into lamp posts!

  • This is an interesting topic just now - the frost has arrived in Yorkshire. I was told to wear a scarf over my mouth but find that this makes my glasses steam up. Anyone got any ideas about how to warm the air and see at the same time?

    Kathyx

  • I have a buff. I find it's great if I need to be doing stuff in the garden when it's a bit nippy but I'm not sure it'd help too much walking into the wind (to be fair I've never tried). Definitely good for not-quite-cold-enough-for-a-scarf moments.

  • It has gotten really icy today - where'd it come from????

    I wonder if it snows in Preston....don't usually get much back home cos we are right on the coast.

  • Hey,

    I'm due to start methylpred in a few weeks and I'm a bit worried about the infection risk over winter. So I have been looking into buying surgical masks but I suppose they would stop the cold air as well.

    Just a thought.

    Tks xx

  • I know what you mean, they're balaclava-scarf-type-things - a fleecy-doodle, for want of a better description. They're sold in a shop I visit frequently called Surf The Wind -no laughing!. There's a choice of fabric (for summer) or fluffy fleecyness (for breathing through in winter!).

    I can't remember what the brand-name is, but was looking to update my autumn FatFace scarf to something more fleecy -They come in many jazzy patterns!

    Alternatively i could try to tempt Sam with cat bikkies to wrap herself around my face- she seems to be warm and fluffy all year round!

    Good luck

    WheezySurf x

  • I have a buff... well to be more precise i ahve several. they do some that are just cottony sort of material but they do others that ahve a fleecy bit at one end. i think they are great and really cozy also you can use them for loads of things like hats etc.

    olive

  • Hi all,

    Tks, and others who are worried about infection/allergen exposure - do your research carefully when you are looking at surgical masks/anti-allergen masks.

    In terms of infection risk, some masks are better than others. The standard surgical masks used in theatre are actually better at preventing direct hits into the sterile field by the surgeon sneezing/spitting when they talk etc, as well as preventing the surgeon getting exposed by getting blood on his face/mouth. They have been shown only to be effective at blocking bacteria and virus sized particles for a few minutes after putting them on. The ones we use in hospital for suspected highly contagious outbreaks with respiratory transmission are different. I can't remember currently what they are called - I'll ask hubby Alex, he may know - but they're often referred to as 'SARS standard masks'. The Centre for Disease Control website has some good advice.

    In terms of allergen avoidance, again a standard face mask won't filter out the tiny allergen particles that a lot of people are allergic to. You need a specific one designed for allergens. There are companies that make them, and a quick Google should bring some up.

    I suppose you could always then use a scarf over the mask, to warm the air that bit more and avoid some of the strange looks?

    As for glasses steaming up - I used to find that a problem until I started wearing contact lenses. You can get a special spray from some opticians that you spray on the lenses which is supposed to stop them steaming up - it's partially effective.

    Em

  • Hi all,

    Tks, and others who are worried about infection/allergen exposure - do your research carefully when you are looking at surgical masks/anti-allergen masks.

    In terms of infection risk, some masks are better than others. The standard surgical masks used in theatre are actually better at preventing direct hits into the sterile field by the surgeon sneezing/spitting when they talk etc, as well as preventing the surgeon getting exposed by getting blood on his face/mouth. They have been shown only to be effective at blocking bacteria and virus sized particles for a few minutes after putting them on. The ones we use in hospital for suspected highly contagious outbreaks with respiratory transmission are different. I can't remember currently what they are called - I'll ask hubby Alex, he may know - but they're often referred to as 'SARS standard masks'. The Centre for Disease Control website has some good advice.

    In terms of allergen avoidance, again a standard face mask won't filter out the tiny allergen particles that a lot of people are allergic to. You need a specific one designed for allergens. There are companies that make them, and a quick Google should bring some up.

    I suppose you could always then use a scarf over the mask, to warm the air that bit more and avoid some of the strange looks?

    As for glasses steaming up - I used to find that a problem until I started wearing contact lenses. You can get a special spray from some opticians that you spray on the lenses which is supposed to stop them steaming up - it's partially effective.

    Em

  • Laughing at your plan with the cat Wheezysurf! Take it you're not allergic to them then? Don't think breathing in that much cat would improve my asthma! (& I think my dog's a bit to big to try!)

  • I have a selection of fleecy scarfs and also a sort of Buff - it is a bright dusky pink cotton scarf, square with big white spots on - it did have a fringe all round but while in the falklands last year It kept getting tangled in zips so I snipped it all off.

    It is very old but a favourite.

    I also find that tucking the top of a fleece scarf under the lenses of my specs stops some condensation.

  • Buff!! That was it! Thanks for the links- trying to explain what I meant by 'fleecy-balaclava-doodle' would get some strange looks in the surf shack!

    Hahaha yeah, maybe your dog's a little big sha76- how about Bungee cords!?

    Cats' don't seem to be a problem- I wake up every morning to find she's snuck up the bed and is curled up just below my pillow so I guess i'm getting used to her fluffyness. Ironically I'm wheezy when she's not there- go figure!

    Wheezysurf x

  • Hmmm, bungee cords could be an option! Only if I can get them in the same colours as my scarves though!

    So have you tried telling your doc/nurse that you're allergic to the absence of cats? Would love to see the look on their face!

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