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Summer time and afib prevention

Hi all,

I live in the states, in Massachusetts to be specific. I'm originally from California and so I'm not used to the heat and humidity of Massachusetts. It makes me super anxious and out of it. I wanted to see what people do in the summer to prevent afib. Any tips?

Tomas

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It is vital that you remain well hydrated at all times. Don't wait till you are thirsty. drink at least four pints of water a day in warm weather and avoid all alcohol, tea coffee etc all of which can dehydrate.

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I live where in the summer, if the temperature drops to 30C it begins to feel a little cool. As BobD says, stay hydrated. Do not try to do as much. If walking around town, stop every hour or so for a drink, perhaps in an airconditioned café. Local people advise against sudden changes in temperature, but biologically, the change gives your sweat glands time to relax and recharge.

Exercise in the heat is the key to acclimatisation. Those who adjust slowly, as the season changes, have less problems than travelers forced to adapt quickly. You will know when you are acclimatised -- your sweat will no longer be salty.

I actually find it easier with my heart during the summer months. So, take care, and enjoy it!

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Mine seems to be the opposite: I go into prolonged Afib events in the cooler months every year. Now that is is warming up, I am on a long (6 weeks?) run of no events (knocking on wood here). Is that something others have noticed?

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Hi, I live in Massachusetts also. I'm not bothered by the weather but I recommend stay well hydrated in the heat. Enjoy our beautiful State! Gracey

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Thank you! I'm in western mass, Northampton to be exact. I haven't gotten used to the extreme weather lol

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I'm nearer Boston so cooler near the water! It's such a magnificent place to live, lots of great medical care also! Good luck ! Gracey

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I live in Northamptonshire​ in England and just cannot get my head around the temperatures of 30 degrees!! Would be extraordinary over here!! 😱😱

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Not really anything to do with preventing AFib as such, but when I lived in a hot and humid climate I found the best way of coping with it was to take a luke warm shower (definitely not hot nor cold) and then to just allow the water to evaporate rather then rubbing dry with a towel. Wrap loosely in a towel and lie on the bed in a shaded room with air con on if you can. It's the humidity that's the 'killer' rather than the heat. I've lived where it's hot and dry too and found that much easier to cope with.

[But this was all long before I had A Fib]

.... that and keeping well-hydrated.

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Hi Fellow Massachusetts resident,

I was born here and was diagnosed with paroxysmal afib 3 years ago. The summers have never kicked off my afib; knock on wood. I do stay hydrated, but I don't think about it too much. I hate the heat and don't mind the cold too much if it is not accompanied by ice or too much snow. How's this week for you; 40 degrees F (4.4 Celsius) on Monday and 95 degree F (35 Celsius) on Thursday? Fortunately for us, it is going to cool off and be pleasant for a while after this.

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Hey KFog, thanks for the message! The weather is so extreme and lately very random. I can't believe today is 95 degrees F and then it's going to be in the 60s and 70s. So weird! I had my first episode last September and it's been a crazy ride since. Don't know if I've had other episodes, but I tend to think about it A LOT. Where in MA are you? I'm in Northampton.

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I'm in Boston. As far as the wide variations in temperature, this is about as crazy as it gets (pretty crazy).

As for the Afib, my first bout I ignored it, but told my doctor about it at my yearly physical. She said to call her if it happened again, which it did, and I ended up hospitalized for several days. I'm on diltiazem, flecanaide, and apixaban. It goes in and out occasionally, but so far, it has always gone away on its own. It's unnerving when it kicks in, though.

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Thanks for the feedback. I'm hoping that my next episode won't be for awhile. I hate being so scared of it. I definitely let it run my life, in my head. I find myself avoiding certain places and doing certain things out of fear. :/

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