Have you heard of precision medicine?, - Asthma UK communi...

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Have you heard of precision medicine?,

AsthmaUK_Nurses profile imageAsthmaUK_NursesAdministrator189 Voters

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17 Replies
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Lysistrata profile image
LysistrataCommunity Ambassador

I have, but then I do work in a science and healthcare-related area and have worked on projects communicating about this, so I'm maybe not the most typical patient!

I'm currently working on something in this kind of area, but it was agreed on that particular project to use the term 'personalised medicine' as it was considered more relatable.

jeffbird profile image
jeffbird in reply to Lysistrata

Hi Yes I work in pharmaceutical research too, I don't think it's a very widely known or understood term

Lysistrata profile image
LysistrataCommunity Ambassador in reply to jeffbird

The discussion we had suggested that 'precision medicine' could be seen as more of a cancer drug type of thing (identify the driver mutation, hit it with a targeted drug). 'Personalised' was seen as broader and not just about targeted drugs (eg identifying lifestyle/behavioural factors like adherence to treatment or smoking).

What is precision medicine?

Dani_AUK-BLF profile image
Dani_AUK-BLFAdministrator in reply to garywake

Hi Gary, there's lots of different ways of explaining precision medicine in asthma, but in short it's something that looks at all the factors that make up you and your health. It considers things like your genetics, body's processes (biomarkers) and your lifestyle which all influence the type of asthma you have and the likelihood of your body responding, or not responding, to certain treatments. Treatments, such as medication, can be tailored more effectively to you, rather than the 'one size fits all' approach which is based only on the symptoms you have, and which we know doesn't work for everyone. Does that help explain things?

Thank you, yes it does.

CDPO16 profile image
CDPO16 in reply to Dani_AUK-BLF

2greys on BLF forum posted yesterday a research article about the 'one size fits all' treatment for asthma being looked at. I think many members of this forum may be interested in reading it.

No but I have heard of person centred care

Hi I'm foxy79 I heard bit about but don't know too much it's related to your guts more bowls etc helps to clear your system I'm sorry I might be wrong as I said I heard it from someone.

Sounds good. How do we get it?

So please tell us what it is? For those of us who don't know.

Claire_AUK profile image
Claire_AUKPartner in reply to Elspe

Hi Elspe, thanks for your reply. We'll post some information on what it is very soon, at this stage we're keen to hear what people do or don't know.👍

Hi, I have heard the term used, particularly with reference to finding out how patients with asthma react to steroids and if they are effective, and testing to see if biologic medicines will work for someone, ie eosinophyllic asthma. As research into asthma improves, it seems that many lung conditions have been grouped under asthma. Precision medicine can test to see what type you have and then treat you with the right medicine. I suspect it will be a long time coming in the UK as my NHS gp, who is very good hadn't even heard of two of the drugs I use for asthma!! and had to have a letter from my consultant to prescribe them.

I hadn't heard of this. I'm intrigued. I have asthma alongside bronchiectasis, pulmonary hypertension, and silent reflux, all of which contribute to shortness of breath. Would be great if it is the case that new developments like precision medicine factored all of this in when treating my asthma.

I haven't heard of the term, but have naively assumed that it is what doctors do anyway. ☺️

Dani_AUK-BLF profile image
Dani_AUK-BLFAdministrator

Hi everyone, thanks so much for your comments. It's been really helpful for us to understand what people already know about precision medicine.

Precision medicine is a treatment that we're likely to see lots more of in the future, which looks at all the factors that make up you and your health. It considers things like your genetics, body's processes (biomarkers) and your lifestyle which all influence the type of asthma you have and the likelihood of your body responding, or not responding, to certain treatments. Treatments, such as medication, can be tailored more effectively to you, rather than the 'one size fits all' approach which is based only on the symptoms you have, and which we know doesn't work for everyone. It means that in the future, doctors will be able to use blood tests and other ways to find the best possible match between treatments for asthma and people with asthma.

I hope that helps, thank you again for your input.

Sounds useful. Also sounds like something I can't see the NHS doing very well on their limited time and overstretched budget.