AF Association
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New survey

More evidence of lifestyle factors being critical as you get older:-

Sarah Knapton, Science Editor Daily Telegraph

21 May 2018 • 1:00am

The largest study of its kind, led by the University of Exeter, found that even small reductions in heart disease risk factors - such as high blood pressure and cholesterol - helped to reduce frailty, as well as dementia, chronic pain, and other disabling conditions of old age.

Lead author of the study Dr Joao Delgado, of the University of Exeter Medical School, said: “This study indicates that frailty and other age-related diseases could be prevented and significantly reduced in older adults.

“Getting our heart risk factors under control could lead to much healthier old ages.

“Unfortunately, the current obesity epidemic is moving the older population in the wrong direction, however our study underlines how even small reductions in risk are worthwhile.”

The study analysed data from more than 421,000 people aged 60 to 69 from both their GP medical records and in the UK Biobank research study. Participants were followed up over 10 years.

People who look after their hearts are far less likely to suffer from fraility in later life

The team looked at six factors that could impact on heart health - uncontrolled high blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose levels, plus being overweight, doing little physical activity and being a current smoker.

Joint lead author, Dr Janice Atkins, also of the University of Exeter Medical School,

This is the first survey that I have seen includes Glucose levels. The message is that there is now a solid bank of evidence that points towards lifestyle factors being critical in staying well as you advance into older age - more grist to the mill.

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Thanks Ian :-) a welcome read having worked hard in the last year to make big changes to my lifestyle which I hope will prove beneficial to my heart and AF .

I am off to the arrhythmia clinic later today on the anniversary of my diagnosis and hope they are impressed with my efforts ....

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Looks like an A star for stating the blinking obvious. We have been saying for ages that weight loss should be a prime aim for anybody with AF and that lifestyle changes need looking at very seriously. There is no doubt in my mind that modern living, processed foods with high sugar content causing the obesity epidemic etc have all contributed to the increase in AF we see these days.

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The Article states.....

“Unfortunately, the current obesity epidemic is moving the older population in the wrong direction.''

I think it is the younger generation that should be giving the most concern, my age group around here are all of a reasonable weight. I was 8 stone until I was in my thirties and then never fat. When I look at some of the young people out and about who are vastly overweight I wonder how their bodies will cope when they reach my age (69).

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I fear that most of them will never attain that age.

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They probably won't!

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There again the journal of circulation has just published a study that shows the risks of heart failure caused by years of sedentary living can be reversed - but -it takes two years of aerobic exercise, four to five times a week . The catch is that there is little change in heart elasticity after 65, by then it appears the damage is done and is not reversible. Use it or lose it.

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Don't worry about it By the time the younger generation reach our age they will all be controlled by AI living in a virtual world being maintained by medication!!

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I was diagnosed with AFib almost three years ago. I am not overweight, walk 25 + miles a week and have a very healthy diet. In the early days of distress and fear I thought 'why me', but now I think 'why not' and try not to dwell on it.

But I agree regarding the younger people today. I told my husband a girl in my class at school in the 60s was teased for being 'fat', but she wasn't fat in the least, just well-built. I look at our school photographs and many of us were like stick insects!

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