Disappointment seeing a consultant endo - Thyroid UK

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Disappointment seeing a consultant endo

mountainice
mountainice

Hi, I have seen a consultant endocrinologist today. After an extremely short discussion he said I am suffering from health anxiety ! The usual, I hear you say. I had gone ready with details of my symptoms etc but he was only interested in numbers, if my thyroid was over 10, and it isn't. The TSH has fluctuated between 5 and 1 for 17 years I have been on this forum before, he said that is normal! When I suggested that other countries treat when the TSH reaches 2.5 he said he worked in Italy and fat pregnant women got treated because their TSH was raised. I have read in many place that 2.5 is now the accepted level - even my own GP said that other countries treat at 2.5 Whatever I said this morning he had an answer and is referring me to a psychiatrist. At first I said no, and then I went along with it just to eliminate. I do have a private appointment on 1st August for an endo so I think I will go ahead with that for another opinion. Whatever I said it was dismissed - swollen legs (didn't even look), neuropathy worse. He said women go to the doctors more than men - I can't think on my feet and it was later in the car that my husband reminded me that men often commit suicide because they don't want to discuss mental health with doctors, I wish I had thought of that. He dismissed my diarrhoea as nervous related because I don't get it in the night, ditto feeling sick. My private appointment is costing me £200 and is with a consultant who also works in the NHS but at least if he says nothing wrong then I will perhaps have to accept that. I have been in touch before with Dr Chandy and he thinks I should be treated for thyroid. I might write to him again but will wait until my private appointment has gone by in August perhaps. Any thoughts on all this please. I am not a hypochondriac, I just look into my health because I feel something is wrong.

69 Replies
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SeasideSusie
SeasideSusieAdministrator

mountainice

No surprise there then, very typical from what we hear on the forum.

What are you current levels for

TSH

FT4

FT3

Thyroid antibodies

Vit D

B12

Folate

Ferritin

Are you taking any supplements?

The private endo you are seeing on 1st August - did you get the name from the list of thyroid friendly endos from Dionne at ThyroidUK? Did you ask for feedback on this endo from fellow members here? If this endo hasn't come with any recommendation or positive feedback, you may wish to ask on the forum if anyone has seen Dr <name> and ask for feedback by private message (we can't discuss individual doctors on the open forum). See what the response is. You may or may not be better off seeing this private endo, if the feedback is not good then don't waste your money, as he works within the NHS too you may well get the same answers as you've just had.

Hi SeasideSusie , my last tests were March this year

TSH 3.5

FT4 13

FT3 4.3

TPO <20 iu/ml [<60] November 18

Fasting Cortisol Feb 19 288 nmol/L [138-620]

B12 May 18, this was Guys Viapath 1872ng/L (187-883) not had tested since I don't think

Vitamin D at Guys 199 nmol/L [50-200]

Folate at GP November 18 - 18.7 ug/L [2.6-17.3]

Ferritin at GP 69 ug/L [10-420]

This endo said B12 high and D too high and I would get D toxicity! I said I take K2 and magnesium. I said I don't blindly take what I read on forums (Facebook say), I always research as well.

I also take a B complex, folate, Vitamin C and Iron and also zinc as I had a zinc deficiency. He said zinc deficiency wasn't necessarily causing the sore on my mouth not to heal. I saw a consultant about my mouth at the time and he said it was the not only the zinc but I had actinic keratosis from too much sun, did I work on a cruise ship ! No, I hardly go in the sun, we didn't start going abroad till our middle forties or fifties. This endo today reckoned that the more tests a person has the more you can find something wrong. The private endo I am seeing is one recommended by my own GP and she thought I would see him on the NHS as he works for NHS too. When I realised I wasn't seeing him, I booked a private appointment just in case today's one came to nothing. I felt he was very condescending towards me but he said he is a holistic doctor! I don't think so at all. He didn't even look at my swollen legs below the knees. My diarrhoea and feeling sick is all to do with anxiety. I know the difference between an anxious feeling if say, I was doing something like a driving test and this diarrhoea I keep getting. I also get stomach and back pain like period pain and pains in my thighs like when I was having a period years ago. I feel dismissed as a neurotic granny with nothing else to do. I have 7 grandchildren and hobbies, I have plenty to do without looking into health all the time! Shall I post separately the name of the consultant I have booked in with privately?

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator in reply to mountainice

Remember to stop taking any supplements that contain biotin (eg most vitamin B complex) a week BEFORE all blood tests

Biotin can falsely affect test results

endo.confex.com/endo/2016en...

endocrinenews.endocrine.org...

We recommend vitamin D between 80nmol-150nmol maximum

Obviously B12 is high if injecting

SeasideSusie
SeasideSusieAdministrator in reply to mountainice

mountainice

TSH 3.5

FT4 13

FT3 4.3

Yes, your TSH is too high for a normal healthy person, but we can't interpret your FT4 and FT3 because you haven't given the ranges.

Vitamin D at Guys 199 nmol/L [50-200]

This endo said B12 high and D too high and I would get D toxicity! I said I take K2 and magnesium. I said I don't blindly take what I read on forums (Facebook say), I always research as well.

Your Vit D at 199nmol/L (79.6ng/ml) is higher than that recommended by the Vit D Council (125nmol/L) and the Vit D Society (100-150nmol/L). You don't want it to go any higher and you might want to drop back your Vit D supplement to just maintain your level nearer 150nmol/L.

vitamindcouncil.org/i-teste...

Ferritin at GP 69 ug/L [10-420]

That is a very wide range for ferritin. Normal range for females is about 13-150 and I've seen it recommended that 100-130 is a good level. Yours isn't bad (it's better than mine!) but it might be better over 70 which is the level where thyroid hormone can work properly (our own as well as replacement hormone).

As for your private endo, I would make a new thread with the title "Has anyone seen Dr <name>" and ask for feedback by private message.

Did you take your B Complex in the 7 days before your test? It very likely contains Biotin and gives false results if Biotin is also used in the testing procedure (many labs use it).

Hello again.

FT4 13 pmol/L [range 9-25]

FT3 4.3 pmol/L [range 3.5-6.5]

I tried to argue about the TSH and it has been up as far as 5 over the years, but he was adamant it was normal. We even talked about the bell curve.

Vitamin D - on the Vitamin D group I follow they say 200 is optimal or even 250.

I checked the Ferritin range in case I had a typo, but that is what it said.

I don't think I was taking B Complex at that time. I did stop taking it when I had the cortisol saliva test. I will make a new post re the consultant. Thanks.

SeasideSusie
SeasideSusieAdministrator in reply to mountainice

TSH 3.5

FT4 13 [range 9-25]

FT3 4.3 [range 3.5-6.5]

With a normal healthy person one would expect to see TSH no higher than 2-ish and FT4/FT3 around mid-range-ish. Your FT4 is 25% through range and your FT3 is 27%. Your thyroid is struggling but you wont get a diagnosis in the UK with those levels. You would need TSH to at least be over range.

Vitamin D - on the Vitamin D group I follow they say 200 is optimal or even 250.

You'll have to decide whose advice you want to follow then, that group or the Vit D Council and Vit D Society. For information, Black Country Pathology Services, which is the NHS lab for City Hospital, Birmingham, who offer Vit D testing for the general public say

Total Vit D levels above 220nmol/L are considered "high" and increase the risk of Vit D toxicity.

I don't think I was taking B Complex at that time. I did stop taking it when I had the cortisol saliva test

You don't have to stop B Complex for a cortisol saliva test. The biotin only affects blood tests. With a cortisol saliva test you just don't take any supplements on the actual day of the test.

Hi again, I am just copying this from Dr Coimbra:

Dr. Cicero Coimbra, one of the world authorities on vitamin D, talks about the physiological dose, recommended for adults over 50 kg body weight without a prescription. It is a dose for health maintenance, not the Coimbra Protocol (which deals with autoimmune diseases and is done with medical monitoring, using higher doses). 👇👇👇

- What do you mean by physiologically realistic dose?

"The internationally recommended daily dose is an insignificant dose, much lower than the physiological dose. It has recently been recognized that the physiological dose is at least 7,000 daily units for adults with normal body mass index, the same amount that is absorbed with only 10 to 20 minutes of sun exposure, depending on the extent of exposed body surface, body position, skin pigmentation, skin age and sun position (which alters the amount of UVB vitamin D produced by radiation).

Sunscreen blocks the body's ability to produce vitamin D, and its use should be delayed until sufficient vitamin D is generated. Therefore, 10,000 IU is also a physiological dose, not an overdose. However, most doctors consider this dose potentially toxic.

Today the recommended dose is still 600 international units, despite this dose being the result of a miscalculation. Therefore, 600 international units are recommended, but if a person is exposed to the sun for only 20 minutes, she can easily produce 10,000 units! This is an obvious difference between medical practice and up-to-date scientific knowledge."

Cícero Galli Coimbra, neurologist, Ph.D.

Source: Vitamin D bei Multiplier Sklerose und Autoimmunerkrankungen

#coimbraprotocol #vitamind #physiologicaldose #highdosevitamind #autoimmunediseases #bookmultiplesclerosisandlotsofvitamind #drcicerocoimbra

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator

BEFORE seeing private endocrinologist we would ALWAYS recommend getting FULL Thyroid and vitamin testing

Note you are self injecting B12 and supplementing vitamin D

healthunlocked.com/thyroidu...

Have you ever had both TPO and TG thyroid antibodies tested? Couldn't see any results in previous posts

For full Thyroid evaluation you need TSH, FT4 and FT3 plus both TPO and TG thyroid antibodies tested. Also important to test vitamin D, folate, ferritin and B12

Low vitamin levels are extremely common, especially if Thyroid antibodies are raised

Recommended on here that all thyroid blood tests should ideally be done as early as possible in morning and fasting. This gives highest TSH, lowest FT4 and most consistent results. (Patient to patient tip, best not mentioned to GP or phlebotomist)

Private tests are available. Thousands on here forced to do this as NHS often refuses to test FT3 or antibodies or all vitamins

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/testin...

Medichecks Thyroid plus ultra vitamin or Blue Horizon Thyroid plus eleven are the most popular choice. DIY finger prick test or option to pay extra for private blood draw. Both companies often have special offers, Medichecks usually have offers on Thursdays, Blue Horizon its more random

If antibodies are high this is Hashimoto's, (also known by medics here in UK more commonly as autoimmune thyroid disease).

About 90% of all primary hypothyroidism in Uk is due to Hashimoto's. One in five Hashimoto's patients never have raised antibodies so an ultrasound scan of thyroid may be helpful

Low vitamins are especially common with Hashimoto's. Food intolerances are very common too, especially gluten. So it's important to get TPO and TG thyroid antibodies tested at least once .

Gut issues are often gluten intolerance. Have you ever had coeliac blood test or tried strictly gluten free diet?

Come back with new post once you get results and ranges on private testing

I have had everything tested except TGA. I even did a full through-the-day saliva cortisol test through Medichecks.

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator in reply to mountainice

So what were TPO and TG thyroid antibodies results?

Is this private endocrinologist from the Thyroid Uk list of recommended thyroid specialists?

You will see my results further up. No, can't see him there.

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator in reply to mountainice

Suggest you get TG antibodies tested via Medichecks or Blue Horizon

healthline.com/health/antit...

We see quite a few on here who only have raised TG antibodies and struggle to get diagnosed

NHS refuses to test TG antibodies if TPO are negative

Ever had ultrasound scan of your thyroid?

One in five Hashimoto's patients never have raised antibodies

healthunlocked.com/thyroidu...

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator in reply to mountainice

Suggest you put new post up with name of this doctor in title - asking for any feedback by private messages only

Not sure how I get a private message on here, only on Facebook. Also, to reply to your other post, no I have not had a scan of thyroid. It was interesting reading your link where soupybp talked about choking on own saliva and a feeling like large pills are stuck. I have had exactly the same In fact, magnesium that I take are quite large and I can take one in the morning but if I take any after say, 5pm there is a sensation like they are stuck. I have, most days (a couple of times a day or more), a sensation of strong tickle in my throat and this travels up to my nose and makes my eyes water usually, then if I try and suppress it, in the end I have to cough to clear it. I do get really stressed out trying to take in information as I am not very good at remembering and there is so much of it. Even my husband said this morning, sorry, but I don't think there is anything wrong with your thyroid, and he is normally sympathetic.

Lora7
Lora7 in reply to mountainice

I have a goitre (not big) I also keep choking on food and sometimes I have coughing fits at night. My husband has also said that I have started snoring loudly.

mountainice
mountainice in reply to Lora7

I don't think I have any swelling at all.

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator in reply to mountainice

To write a new private message

Click on person you want to contact. This takes to to their profile page. (You can read people's profiles there too) ....Click message button and write message

To reply to a message from someone, click on the two speech bubbles at top left of this page

thank you. I can do it in Facebook!

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator in reply to mountainice

Two options

Getting TG antibodies tested via Medichecks or Blue Horizon

medichecks.com/thyroid-func...

Considering DIO2 gene test

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/testin...

shaws
shawsAdministrator in reply to mountainice

To receive a private message, your post will be closed automatically by an Admin when you request info re an Endo or Doctor or where to source medication. You will then be alerted you've a response when a red 'bubble' appears on the top of your page and also will be alerted of a response. Members will click on your 'name' and it takes them to a page which is private between yourself and the members.

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator in reply to mountainice

Have you tried 3-6 months strictly gluten free to see if this improves gut?

Similarly tried lactose free diet?

Had coeliac blood test?

Had a coeliac test, all ok. Not tried gluten-free, not sure I could stick it or lactose-free. I know you would say I should try anything, but I don't want to go down that route yet.

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator in reply to mountainice

Obviously the vast numbers of Hashimoto's patients who are strictly gluten free, found the idea daunting ....I know I did

But the only way to know if it helps is to try it

It can be astonishing improvement

Links about Non Coeliac Gluten sensitivity and autoimmune disease

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/296...

The predominance of Hashimoto thyroiditis represents an interesting finding, since it has been indirectly confirmed by an Italian study, showing that autoimmune thyroid disease is a risk factor for the evolution towards NCGS in a group of patients with minimal duodenal inflammation. On these bases, an autoimmune stigma in NCGS is strongly supported

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/300...

The obtained results suggest that the gluten-free diet may bring clinical benefits to women with autoimmune thyroid disease

nuclmed.gr/wp/wp-content/up...

In summary, whereas it is not yet clear whether a gluten free diet can prevent autoimmune diseases, it is worth mentioning that HT patients with or without CD benefit from a diet low in gluten as far as the progression and the potential disease complications are concerned

restartmed.com/hashimotos-g...

Despite the fact that 5-10% of patients have Celiac disease, in my experience and in the experience of many other physicians, at least 80% + of patients with Hashimoto's who go gluten-free notice a reduction in their symptoms almost immediately.

88% benefit from strictly gluten free diet

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

Going gluten free is a strategy that everyone with Hashimoto’s should try. In some cases, we see a complete remission of the condition; in other cases (88% of the time), the person feels significantly better in terms of bloating, diarrhea, energy, weight, constipation, stomach pain, reflux, hair regrowth, and anxiety.

todaysdietitian.com/newarch...

Many clinicians report that eating a gluten-free diet may help improve thyroid function in nonceliac gluten intolerance. “Getting gluten out is primary for patients with Hashimoto’s, even without celiac disease,”

Thank you. I can't read all those now, about to do ironing and try and relax from that man this morning!

Commiserations. Bet he was a diabetes specialist! They have no idea about thyroid. Do you know what your private endo specialises in?

My private appointment is costing me £200 and is with a consultant who also works in the NHS but at least if he says nothing wrong then I will perhaps have to accept that.

I disagree entirely. You don't have to accept that. Does he know more than the other endo? Can he prove that? You know your body and you know when something is wrong. And it has nothing to do with women going to the doctors more often - what a stupid thing to say? What has that got to do with anything? Women have more complicated endocrine systems - which he obviously knows nothing about! So, we're more prone to things going wrong.

Don't give up just because a couple of men say there's nothing wrong with you. Worse than that, imply that you're crazy or something! That makes me so mad! It's not a psychiatrist you need, it's thyroid hormones. And if this so-called doctor didn't have his head up his fundament, he would know that. But, like all doctors, he took the easy way out. They make me sick!

There, now I've had my rant for the day. lol :) Follow your convictions and don't let them put you off. :)

You say don't give up, but where would I go from there, I just don't know. I can't quite understand the posts on here. It came up down the right hand side about swollen legs but now I can't find the links as the symptoms were like mine. I tried the search button but I couldn't find the posts.

Lora7
Lora7 in reply to mountainice

I find this thread difficult to follow as well.

shaws
shawsAdministrator in reply to mountainice

To get the name of a sympathetic private doctor/endo email Dionne at Thyroiduk who has a list. We don't put info on the open forum. More than one doctor who thought 'outside the box' has been reprimanded.

Many members on this forum, 'Do it Themselves' by getting private blood tests and posting results, with the ranges, so that members can respond. Many members know more than most doctors/endocrinologists and we can even 'hear' members anger when they post their experience when they go full of hope that someone can help them feel better and enable TSH to be 1 or lower and enesure that FT4 and FT3 are also tested. Quite a number of members have been disappointed and especially if they've also paid for the consultation. Dionne's email below.

tukadmin@thyroiduk.org

mountainice
mountainice in reply to shaws

Thank you, I do have Dionne's list she emailed me in February, through your kind selves. I am scared of the do-it-yourself option, not sure why. I think it is because thyroid is important and will I get it right.

shaws
shawsAdministrator in reply to mountainice

It is scary to possibly contemplate self-medicating but there comes a time, when we've tried several or more options and have come to the end of the road when no help or advice has come from the 'experts'.

When I say don't give up, I mean don't just accept that there's nothing wrong with you, because you know there is. Keep bringing it up from time to time, with your doctor. Get retested in a years time. Make a nuisance of yourself! Sometimes, they give in just to get rid of you.

Above all, keep on reading on here. You may not understand it all at the moment, but eventually it will start to make sense. And, once you know about your disease, there's the always to option to start self-treating, like so many of us do.

Have the courage of your convictions. You know there is something wrong. Eventually they will, too.

thank you. I know I am not imagining or 'creating' these symptoms out of nowhere. I have 7 grandchildren and hobbies, I don't want to be thinking about health all the time, I wish I had said that to him.

Don't suppose it would have made much difference. They don't listen. Once they've got an idea in their heads, they're like bulldozers, they just plough on, no matter what.

Hi, I know I don't feel right and it is only my very strong will that gets me through sometimes - I told him that.

The private one says this on his webpage:

Treats Thyroid disease, Pituitary disease, Parathyroid disease, Diabetes, Osteoporosis, Obesity and Hypertension. Adrenal disease, Low testosterone in men, Polycystic ovarian disease, Endocrine related cancer and Female hormonal disorders, General tiredness and fatigue, Vitamin D deficiency and Endocrine related headache.

I qualified in 1994 from The London Hospital. I trained in general medicine, diabetes and endocrinology in London.

I have published over 30 papers and 70 abstracts in areas of diabetes and endocrinology. I have written 5 book chapters in the management of endocrine conditions and have published a book on general medicine. My recent research interests include polycystic ovary syndrome, pituitary tumours and female hormone disorders and headache. I give lectures locally, nationally and internationally, and has recently been on national radio regarding thyroid disease and pregnancy.

This is the one the GP said she was sending me to, but I didn't get him. I know I shouldn't take notice, but the one today was very casual, wearing shorts ! Didn't look very professional and I didn't gel with him at all. Actually, I feel quite insulted the way he spoke to me. He dictated the letter in front of me to the GP - said he always does that so there are no surprises when I get the copy. He said in there 'health anxiety'.

I said B12 deficiency is a polyglandular disease and he said it can be. Trouble is, I think the more I said, the more he thought I knew too much and must have been 'googling'. I feel very angry and upset.

shaws
shawsAdministrator in reply to mountainice

The quote of 'health anxiety' just tells me what an inexpert he is and goes only by 'numbers alone' and takes no account of clinical symptoms. Of course we're anxious - we have clinical symptoms and feel awful and expect someone we probably helped to pay for their education ignores our plight to be reassuring and do their utmost for us..

mountainice
mountainice in reply to shaws

He was only looking at numbers. When I mentioned the word 'worry' he jumped on it and repeated it back to me. Of course I will worry if my health is wrong!

shaws
shawsAdministrator in reply to mountainice

They really need to experience some illnesses.

Our 'old fashioned' doctors - before blood test were introduced as being a 'perfect' way of diagnosing used to give us a trial of NDT according to our clinical symptoms - no blood tests then. If we improved we were hypo and if not, they looked elsewhere. Unfortunately for those doctors, when they followed how the were trained before blood tests and levothyroxine were introduced, were pursued by the Associations because they didn't follow the 'guidelines' and some lost their licences. They treated patients long before blood tests were introduced according to patients' symptoms.

If you read the book 'Tears Behind Closed Doors' which I think should be studied by student doctors - even if not going to follow endocrinology which shows exactly what happens to patients when the doctors know 'nothing at all' about symptoms.

mountainice
mountainice in reply to shaws

Dr Chandy told me I should be medicated and last email said he was very disappointed in my doctors. I haven't told him the latest episode! This doctor also 'confided' in me that he sees a therapist every week. Sometimes he goes home and the wife is screaming at the kids and he has to sort it out and calm the boy and then the wife says he is not supporting her. All this during my consultation! Unprofessional or what.

mountainice
mountainice in reply to shaws

2nd reply. Dr Chandy nearly lost his licence through treating B12 deficiency on symptoms not numbers, if you read his book.

mountainice
mountainice in reply to shaws

Also, I just remembered - when I talked to him about my bowel problems that occur say, every 6 days or so, he said do you have to go in the night. I said no, so he said that it is not organic then, therefore health anxiety because if it was organic I would be up in the night. I forgot to say it follows a pattern - builds on day 1 with a couple of trips to the loo, 2nd day bowels opening all the time, often every time I pass water, 3rd day starts to decrease till it's gone - until the next time. I couldn't sleep last night because I still had stomach pain and had being going to the loo all day. I had to get up and watch tv. Today, much less but not completely gone.

Same old story time and time again! I feel like writing to Boris to see if he might help our plight. He seems to want to sort out the country so why can't he help us get some proper thyroid treatment on the NHS.

I have been told to take antidepressants and go for counselling a couple of times by so called experts. What I don't understand is why Doctors think we can talk ourselves better when what we need is some medical advice and treatment for physical symptoms. I don't think my brain has made my hair drop out, my nails lift off their nail beds and my thyroid become enlarged and have numerous nodules!

mountainice
mountainice in reply to Lora7

I felt really talked down to but I do get anxious about certain things, I am a bit of a perfectionist, but not anxious about my health, only in the sense that I want to be well and I get fed up feeling under par or even terrible with 'collapsing' days. I told him I had collapsing days but he said nothing. I forgot to say that often I get these bad stomachs if I eat certain food, like meat pie in a restaurant or commercial gravy. His argument was if I don't get diarrhoea in the night then it is not organic, therefore must be anxiety. I have said I will attend this psychiatrist/psychologist or whatever. I have had mental health problems in the past but a long time ago. I occasionally get anxious, not been right this year but getting better, but I know my own body, as someone said on here. Have you had any joy with a doctor for yourself?

Hidden
Hidden in reply to mountainice

Don’t go to a Psychiatrist unless you feel you need to. Sad to say it will be on your medical record and dragged up even when you have a verruca.

(You don’t have a verruca do you? That could be why you can’t think on your feet😊)

mountainice
mountainice in reply to Hidden

Ha ha. I already had psychiatrist on my record as I was in hospital 4 months in a psychiatric ward in 1995 and again the following year for 3 months. I now think that was to do with low B12 (I nearly said that to this man today, but thought better of it as he would have pooh-poohed it). I was so anaemic I need injections plus I had tingling in my feet.

Lora7
Lora7 in reply to mountainice

Yes I did with one Doctor but unfortunately he died.

mountainice
mountainice in reply to Lora7

Oh, I am sorry, it is so hard to find the right one.

Lora7
Lora7 in reply to mountainice

I haven't had much success yet over the 12 years I have been seeing different Doctors through the NHS.

shaws
shawsAdministrator in reply to mountainice

Antidepressants! Were your FT3 and FT4 tested ?. Low FT3 can cause depressive symptoms.

endocrineweb.com/conditions...

mountainice
mountainice in reply to shaws

Yes, been tested. FT3 was 4.3.

‘He said he worked in Italy and fat pregnant women got treated because their TSH was raised’

‘He says women go to the doctors more than men.’

I’m deeply shocked. You really must report this man for his misogyny. This is outrageous. How dare he! Someone with these unprofessional attitudes should not be practising. 🤸🏿‍♀️🥛

I only realised really what he had said once I had left the room and gone to the car. I was trying to keep calm in there, but it was hard to hold it together. It is terrible. I think I will make an appointment with my GP, even though she is going to get his letter, I still want to discuss this terrible consultation. Same when I went to have some warts taken of a few years back - it's under your clothes so won't notice. Doesn't matter because you are past 60 was what I read in that wart consultation. Sorry digressing.

Hidden
Hidden in reply to mountainice

You must report this man to hospital authorities.

Lora7
Lora7 in reply to mountainice

There is a complaints procedure you can go through. Look on your local NHS website and see who you need to contact. This man needs to be stopped from putting other patients through this nonsense.

I just found this

nhs.uk/using-the-nhs/about-...

Hidden
Hidden

Well. Don’t think you need to see a psychiatrist. He obviously knows more about mental health than endocrinology😡

mountainice
mountainice in reply to Hidden

I feel like I am wasting NHS money if I go and see one, but I suppose perhaps it could satisfy the doctor. He even has me believing there is something wrong with me mentally because I do have issues now and then. I know I don't imagine swollen legs, shoulder pain and can't lift my arm, neuropathy getting worse and can't feel the accelerator pedal barely with my right foot.

Hidden
Hidden in reply to mountainice

Why do you want to satisfy the doctor? Have you been dx with Neuropathy and had nerve conduction studies? If not, seeing a neurologist to sort that might be a good move. Untreated hypothyroidism is the second biggest reason for neuropathy. The first is diabetes or pre diabetes.

mountainice
mountainice in reply to Hidden

What I mean is satisfy my own GP as she has been helpful so far. Yes, I had nerve conduction tests back in 2008 because I was complaining of numbness and afterwards they found I had lowish B12, so I was put on injections. My neuropathy is getting worse and I told this doctor that but he just did not listen to anything I said, and I had already read that you can get neuropathy with hypothyroidism. At that point, I knew there was no point arguing as he had already made up his mind that I was a prolific 'Googler' of symptoms. My neuropathy is getting worse, spreading up my legs and also worse in my feet. I am scared to complain - do people complain? I do want to tell my GP

Lora7
Lora7 in reply to mountainice

I have complained in the past and I was told to see a different Doctor.

Marz
Marz in reply to mountainice

If you are having B12 injections - how often do you have them ? Also when injecting - symptoms can sometimes worsen before they improve. B12 is involved in the maintenance of the myelin sheath that surrounds all nerves. A bit like the plastic coating on electrical cabling 😊

mountainice
mountainice in reply to Marz

I have been on monthly for about 2 years but recently started SI in April. Not really regular at doing it, sometimes 4 days, sometimes 8, sometimes 12 between each one. I still don't like doing it, just because I am worried about hitting a nerve.

shaws
shawsAdministrator in reply to Hidden

Or causing symptom to develop a mental health problem. We go to them to get 'answers' not to be rebuffed.

mountainice
mountainice in reply to shaws

I have had a few mental health problems this year. I had a panic attack in choir and I had to give up singing lessons in January, then gave up choir in March and also gave up piano lessons. I just could not see anyone apart from my children and their families. I just did not want to interact with anyone, I just instinctively knew and that I had to keep quite quiet and just be on my own doing my own things. I also can't have anything new at the moment, even to the extent my husband tried to buy a little knick-knack off a stall at church and it just freaked me out and I started panicking.

A few years ago I saw a gynaeocologist for my fibroids. He was a large black man who was from overseas (I am not at all racist and one of my close relatives is from Jamaica) I had taken my husband with me for support and I am glad I did. When I told him I was having heavy periods and was suffering with pain from my fibroids he gave a loud sigh. He then started to tell us about the women in his country who didn't get the care I was getting and never complained (this is absolutely true even though it sounds like a comedy sketch) They walked for hours to get to a clinic to give birth and weren't given pain killers for the labour. My husband and I sat there with our mouths open not believing what we were hearing. Luckily my husband worked for the NHS and knew how to deal with Doctors like him and I came away with an appointment for a scan for my fibroids. I never saw him again thank goodness.

mountainice
mountainice in reply to Lora7

Terrible. A bit like saying we should all have operations with no anaesthetic because we didn't used to have anaesthetic years ago so we should all grit our teeth!

shaws
shawsAdministrator in reply to Lora7

I'd like to see this doctor experience 'heavily pregnant' and walking miles to the delivery room.

Lora7
Lora7 in reply to shaws

He made me feel like the women in his country were much fitter and stronger and if they had fibroids they would just get on with it and not waste his time over something so trivial. My husband said "Well we aren't in your country now are we and my wife doesn't have to walk miles for treatment. I feel sorry for the women in your country having such poor health care" ha ha

mountainice
mountainice in reply to Lora7

good for him

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