Gwyneth Paltrow didn't want Condé Nast to fact-... - Thyroid UK

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Gwyneth Paltrow didn't want Condé Nast to fact-check Goop articles

helvella
helvellaAdministrator

Somewhat off-topic, but meant to encourage a healthy level of questioning about all sources of information.

There is an awful lot of poor quality "information" out there. This is just one example of a situation in which even a fairly modest level of checking was effectively rejected.

Looks as if Gwynneth is more concerned with monetizing those eyeballs than the health and well-being of her readers.

I suspect an awful lot of web sites - and print publications - would fail any level of fact checking.

Gwyneth Paltrow didn't want Condé Nast to fact-check Goop articles

Partnership between publisher and lifestyle site to produce a magazine fell apart due to ‘old-school’ rules, actor says

Gwyneth Paltrow’s partnership with Condé Nast was touted by the publisher’s artistic director Anna Wintour as a “something remarkable, a thoroughly modern take on how we live today”. The plan was for the publisher to make a regular Goop magazine, but it all fell apart when Condé Nast wanted to fact-check Goop articles, according to an interview with Paltrow in the New York Times Magazine.

Rest of article available here:

theguardian.com/film/2018/j...

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'Gwyneth Paltrow’s partnership with Condé Nast was touted by the publisher’s artistic director Anna Wintour as a “something remarkable, a thoroughly modern take on how we live today”.'

......really.....hm...

Perhaps Anna Wintour was refering to herself in the plural.

Me? I'm sipping an ice cold Baltika (first time I've tried it. Not bad.) to counteract the effect of the heat of summer which is dire. I'm not even a beer drinker but an ice cold Pinot Grigio with soda just isn't cutting it this year. Clearly not a Paltrowite here. ;)

Very interesting that this fact checking occurs behind the scenes in these big publishers. I've also heard a few interesting anecdotes about unintended consequences of thorough fact checking by New Yorker magazine. Old school friends being contacted to verify events in autobiographical pieces, or companies being alerted to their mention so they can pull a marketing stunt on time, etc.

I wish these things were more out in the open, something more like including references. So that we'd know which sources have done a decent amount of fact checking. Obviously not all fact checking is equal!!

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