Log in
Thyroid UK
96,810 members110,621 posts

Help with test results please.

Hello 🙂. I had my latest blood test results from Medichecks yesterday and wondered if anyone could tell me if there’s any significance to the different antibodies, please? I realise the need to return to my GP for a possible increase in Levothyroxine, but as I am Pre-diabetic, with high BP and have stage 3 liver fibrosis (non-alcoholic), would I benefit from seeing an endocrinologist? Any advice would be very welcome.

ENDOCRINOLOGY

Thyroid Function

THYROID STIMULATING HORMONE 3.35

FREE THYROXINE 15.2

TOTAL THYROXINE(T4) 91.3

FREE T3 4.27

THYROGLOBULIN ANTIBODY *357.000

THYROID PEROXIDASE ANTIBODIES*161

Many thanks 🙂

11 Replies
oldestnewest

Hello Jinnie.

Could you post your results again with their ranges. This allows people to see where your levels lie within them.

I'm wondering if you may have high antibodies. With out the ranges, I wouldn't like to say.

If this is the case, high antibodies indicate you have Hashimoto's auto immune thyroiditis.

Do you take any vitamin & minerals and have test results for these?

Deficiencies alone, in these, can cause all sorts of problems for our thyroid.

How much Levo are you currently taking?

I'm afraid I can't comment on you being pre-diabetic or your liver fibrosis. Someone far more knowledgeable will come along & help.

I know I asked lots of questions but the answers do help us to help you 🙂

Reply

Update - I saw a GP and he said my TSH level was normal, so he won’t increase the dose, and also said my antibodies will continue to increase anyway because of my Hashimoto’s. I have been gluten free for 7 months and there has been no change in my condition 🙁 I could try to increase my 75mcg to 100mcg myself, as I have a backlog of Levothyroxine tablets which are still in date.

Many thanks for your help x

Reply

Hi Jinnie64, Yes, yes and maybe. You didn't include the lab ranges, but I think I can still decipher your labs. (can you please add the ranges?). The significance of your high antibodies that you have Hashimoto's. If you are on thyroid medication, you are a long way from where you should be, especially with Hashimoto's. When properly medicated, your TSH should be under 1.0. Most properly medicated people with Hashi's are well under 0.50.

Your FT4 is too low and far from the optimal part of the range where people report the least symptoms. Your FT3 is the same: too low. Which type of medication are you on and what is the dose?

As for seeing an endocrinologist, it depends on if they are thyroid and Hashimoto's literate or not. Many doctors will tell you that once you have Hashimoto's, your antibody levels don't matter. Yes, they do! The higher the antibodies, the greater the attack on your thyroid. You want to try to suppress your TSH and get your FT3 and FT4 up where they should be because this can help reduce your antibodies. There are also things you should do to try to reduce your antibodies. Since this is an autoimmune disease, an autoimmune diet is recommended, called the AIP diet. Autoimmune protocol. At a minimum, going completely gluten free for at least 3 months is suggested to see if you feel better and if inflammation is reduced. Also, dairy and soy free are recommended. Gluten, dairy and soy are inflammatory. So are nightshade veggies, fruits, and spices. If your antibodies increase, this is not good and you need to look at why. Could be from illness, exposure to viruses, bacterias, environmental toxins, inflammatory foods, etc. Whatever the cause, that needs to be diagnosed and put under control.

:-)

Reply

Update - I saw a GP and he said my TSH level was normal, so he won’t increase the dose, and also said my antibodies will continue to increase anyway because of my Hashimoto’s. I have been gluten free for 7 months and there has been no change in my condition 🙁 I could try to increase my 75mcg to 100mcg myself, as I have a backlog of Levothyroxine tablets which are still in date.

Many thanks for your help x

1 like
Reply

How unfortunate. Can you see a different doctor who is familiar with treating Hashimoto’s correctly? This one doesn’t understand the disease.

You TSH is much to high for some one who is hypo and on meds and especially someone with Hashimoto’s. It should be inder 1.0. It’s so high and your FT3 and FT4 are too low, because you’re under medicate. Besides, dosage is based on TSH alone. It’s based on the measurement of your actual thyroid hormones, T3 and T4, and you symptoms.

This guy really doesn’t understand Hashimoto’s. No, your antibodies will not just continually increase. You don’t want them to keep increasing, you want them decrease. If you are properly medicated, you are taking some strain off your thyroid and they should decrease. If left under medicated as he’s left you, then yes, they will increase. Increasing antibodies means more damage to your thyroid.

Gluten free reduces inflammation. It won’t get your thyroid levels into the part of the range where they should be. You still feel the same because your under medicated.

Why do you have a back log of levo?

If you can post your lab ranges, that would be helpful to see exactly how low your FT3 and FT4 are.

:-)

Reply

I see the ranges below now. :-)

Reply

TSH should be around or just under one when on Levothyroxine, and FT4 towards top of range and FT3 at least half way in range. So you need dose increase and retesting in 6-8 weeks

Your antibodies confirm that you have Hashimoto's also called autoimmune thyroid disease

What about vitamin D, folate, ferritin and B12 levels. Ask GP to test these and also for a coeliac blood test too

Low vitamins are especially common with Hashimoto's

According to Izabella Wentz the Thyroid Pharmacist approx 5% with Hashimoto's are coeliac, but over 80% find gluten free diet helps significantly. Either due to direct gluten intolerance (no test available) or due to leaky gut and gluten causing molecular mimicry (see Amy Myers link)

Changing to a strictly gluten free diet may help reduce symptoms, help gut heal and slowly lower TPO antibodies

TG antibodies should lower as TSH reduces

amymyersmd.com/2017/02/3-im...

chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

scdlifestyle.com/2014/08/th...

drknews.com/changing-your-d...

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

Official NHS guidelines saying TSH should be between 0.2 and 2.0 when on Levothyroxine

(Many of us need TSH nearer 0.2 than 2.0 to feel well)

See box

Thyroxine replacement in primary hypothyroidism

pathology.leedsth.nhs.uk/pa...

Dr Toft, past president of the British Thyroid Association and leading endocrinologist, states in Pulse Magazine,

"The appropriate dose of levothyroxine is that which restores euthyroidism and serum TSH to the lower part of the reference range - 0.2-0.5mU/l.

In this case, free thyroxine is likely to be in the upper part of its reference range or even slightly elevated – 18-22pmol/l.

Most patients will feel well in that circumstance. But some need a higher dose of levothyroxine to suppress serum TSH and then the serum-free T4 concentration will be elevated at around 24-28pmol/l.

This 'exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism' is not dangerous as long as serum T3 is unequivocally normal – that is, serum total around T3 1.7nmol/l (reference range 1.0-2.2nmol/l)."

You can obtain a copy of the articles from Thyroid UK email print it and highlight question 6 to show your doctor

 please email Dionne at

tukadmin@thyroiduk.org

Reply

Update - I saw a GP and he said my TSH level was normal, so he won’t increase the dose, and also said my antibodies will continue to increase anyway because of my Hashimoto’s. I have been gluten free for 7 months and there has been no change in my condition 🙁 I could try to increase my 75mcg to 100mcg myself, as I have a backlog of Levothyroxine tablets which are still in date.

Many thanks for your help x

Reply

Many thanks, Paula 101, Shooting Stars and SlowDragon for all your help. I am reposting the results:

ENDOCRINOLOGY

Thyroid Function

THYROID STIMULATING HORMONE 3.35 mIU/L 0.27 - 4.20

FREE THYROXINE 15.2 pool/L 12.00 - 22.00

TOTAL THYROXINE(T4) 91.3 nmol/L 59.00 - 154.00

FREE T3 4.27 pmol/L 3.10 - 6.80

THYROGLOBULIN ANTIBODY *357.000 IU/mL 0.00 - 115.00

THYROID PEROXIDASE ANTIBODIES*161. IU/mL 0.00 - 34.00

I have been gluten free for 8 months but will definitely be looking into everything you have suggested. There is a lot to go back to my GP with!

Thanks!

Reply

Update - I saw a GP and he said my TSH level was normal, so he won’t increase the dose, and also said my antibodies will continue to increase anyway because of my Hashimoto’s. I have been gluten free for 7 months and there has been no change in my condition 🙁

Reply

As per Slowdragons post, have you had any tests for vitamin D, B12 levels, folate, ferritin & asked for a coeliac blood test?

If not then do make an appointment with your GP. SlowDragon has sent fantastic links & if you read up on these you'll be better armed & better informed. More informed than the Dr actually as they know "zip" about thyroid conditions 🙂

If you start a new post entitling it Levo, pre-diabetic & stage 3 liver fibrosis then someone should be able to help out, the title will catch someone's eye. I'm sorry that I can't advise on that.

Reply

You may also like...