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Medichecks Ultravit RT3 results.Help please

Hi All,

I'm new to this site & would like some help regarding my results.

I did post the results before but noticed that where I copied/pasted, everything was out of sync & hard to read.

So I have typed out this time & hopefully makes sense.

I have always suffered from underactive thyroid symptoms but every blood test from the Doctors always fall with the normal range.

But when I have my yearly Vega test with my nutritionist, Thyroid always shows up!

I am currently not taking any medication for Thyroid & would like someone out there to help me to understand the results below (result first & ranges second)

Thanks everyone xxx

TSH 1.52 mIU/L 0.27 - 4.20

Free Thyroxine 11 pmol/L 12.00 - 22.00

Total Thyroxine (T4) 68.3 nmol/L 59.00 - 154.00

Free T3 4.03 pmol/L 3.10 - 6.80

Reverse T3 11 ng/dL 10.00 - 24.00

Reverse T3 Ratio 23.85 15.01 - 75.00

Thyroglobulin Antibody <10 IU/mL 0.00 - 115.00

Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies <9.0 IU/mL 0.00 - 34.00

Active B12 90.900 pmol/L 25.10 - 165.00

Folate (Serum) 4.84 ug/L 2,91 - 50.00

25 OH Vitamin D 40.3 nmol/L 50.00 - 200.00

CRP High Sensitivity 7.72 mg/l 0.00 - 5.00

Ferritin 60.1 ug/L 13.00 - 150.00

3 Replies
oldestnewest

Hi Esther

Easiest things first :)

Thyroglobulin Antibody <10 IU/mL 0.00 - 115.00

Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies <9.0 IU/mL 0.00 - 34.00

Antibodies nice and low, no sign of autoimmune thyroid disease.

**

CRP High Sensitivity 7.72 mg/l 0.00 - 5.00

Slightly raised CRP, indicates inflammation or infection somewhere, but it's not specific. If it continues to be raised then perhaps looking for the cause would be a good idea.

**

Ferritin 60.1 ug/L 13.00 - 150.00

This isn't too bad but for thyroid hormone to work (that's our own as well as replacement hormone) ferritin needs to be at least 70, preferably half way through range. You can help raise your level by eating liver regularly, maximum 200g per week due to it's high Vit A content, and including lots of iron rich foods in your diet apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/in...

**

Active B12 90.900 pmol/L 25.10 - 165.00

No problem with this result, if it was less than 70 then further investigation with a MMA test (Methylmalonic Acid) would have been a good idea as it would look for early signs of B12 deficiency. You can check symptoms here b12deficiency.info/signs-an... and if you think you have any perhaps ask your GP to do further testing.

Folate (Serum) 4.84 ug/L 2,91 - 50.00

Folate and B12 work together. Your folate level is very low in range, recommended is at least half way through.

You could discuss with your GP about the reasons, one is not enough folate in your diet. You may be offered folic acid but your GP may not do this unless you are actually below the range. You can increase your folate level by increasing folate rich foods and taking a good B Complex with 400mcg methylfolate will help raise your level (eg Thorne Basic B).

If you do have any signs of B12 deficiency, then do not start folic acid or B Complex until further testing is carried out.

**

25 OH Vitamin D 40.3 nmol/L 50.00 - 200.00

This is far too low, you are in the deficient or insufficient category. The Vit D Council recommends a level of 100-150nmol/L.

Your GP may or may not be willing to prescribe D3, but he may only prescribe 800iu daily which wont be enough to raise your level. My suggestion would be to buy your own D3 and take 5000iu daily for 8-10 weeks then retest. Once you've reached the recommended level then you'll need a maintenance dose which may be 2000iu daily, maybe more or less, it's trial and error so it's recommended to retest once or twice a year to keep within the recommended range. You can do this with a private fingerprick blood spot test with City Assays vitamindtest.org.uk/

There are important cofactors needed when taking D3

vitamindcouncil.org/about-v...

D3 aids absorption of calcium from food and K2-MK7 directs the calcium to bones and teeth where it is needed and away from arteries and soft tissues where it can be deposited and cause problems.

D3 and K2 are fat soluble so should be taken with the fattiest meal of the day, D3 four hours away from thyroid meds (if you are prescribed any).

Magnesium helps D3 to work and comes in different forms, check to see which would suit you best and as it's calming it's best taken in the evening, four hours away from thyroid meds (if you are prescribed any)

naturalnews.com/046401_magn...

Check out the other cofactors too.

Good D3 softgels are Doctor's Best and Now Foods.

Good K2-MK7 softgels are Healthy Origins.

**

Reverse T3 11 ng/dL 10.00 - 24.00

Reverse T3 Ratio 23.85 15.01 - 75.00

No problem at all with these results.

**

I think your problem may lie here:

TSH 1.52 mIU/L 0.27 - 4.20

This is normal and where one would expect to see it in a healthy person with no thyroid disease.

However......

Free Thyroxine 11 pmol/L 12.00 - 22.00

Below range.

Total Thyroxine (T4) 68.3 nmol/L 59.00 - 154.00

Very low in range indicating you're not making much natural thyroxine, which is also shown in your FT4 (Free Thyroxine) result.

Free T3 4.03 pmol/L 3.10 - 6.80

Shows your body is doing it's best to make T3 which is the active hormone (converted from T4) which every cell in our bodies need.

Taking the normal TSH and below range FT4, and I am not medically trained, and I am not diagnosing, but what could be indicated here is Central Hypothyroidism. This is where the problem lies with the hypothalamus or the pituitary rather than a problem with the thyroid gland. With Central Hypothyroidism the TSH can be low, normal or slightly raised, and the FT4 will be low.

TSH is a pituitary hormone, the pituitary checks to see if there is enough thyroid hormone, if not it sends a message to the thyroid to produce some. That message is TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone). In Primary Hypothyroidism the TSH will be high. If there is enough hormone then there's no need for the pituitary to send the message to the thyroid so TSH remains low.

However, with Central Hypothyroidism the signal isn't getting through for whatever reason. It could be due to a problem with the pituitary (Secondary Hypothyroidism) or the hypothalamus (Tertiary Hypothyroidism).

Your GP can look at BMJ Best Practice for information - here is something you can read without needing to be subscribed

bestpractice.bmj.com/topics...

and another article which explains it

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

You could do some more research, print out anything that may help and show your GP, or maybe a different one.

As Central Hypothyroidism isn't as common as Primary Hypothyroidism it's likely that your GP hasn't come across it before. You may need to be referred to an endocrinologist. If so then please make absolutely sure that it is a thyroid specialist that you see. Most endos are diabetes specialists and know little about the thyroid gland (they like to think they do and very often end up making us much more unwell that we were before seeing them). You can email Dionne at tukadmin@thyroiduk.org for the list of thyroid friendly endos. Then ask on the forum for feedback on any that you can get to. Then if your GP refers you, make sure it is to one recommended here. It's no guarantee that they will understand Central Hypothyroidism but it's better than seeing a diabetes specialist. You could also ask on the forum if anyone has been successful in getting a diagnosis of Central Hypothyroidism, possibly in your area which you'll have to mention of course.

Reply

SeasideSusie,

Thank you so much for your detailed reply, really really appreciate it.

What causes Central Hypo?

My symptoms elevated after I gave birth to our only son, which was an emergency cesarean & overall not very nice experience. Son perfectly fine.

I had bad pre eclampsia, suffered from Post natal depression/anxiety & basically struggled for a while, until Doctor put me on anti depressants, which I am still on now.

I have for a long time "never felt 100% right" always tired, achey but the Doctors answers were always to offer More Anti depressants.

I am now more determined than ever to help myself get better & more Thyroid educated to tackle this problem with the doctors & hopefully get this sorted once & for all.

Thanks again

Reply

Central hypo is caused by a problem higher up the axis - hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid axis.

So investigation should be carried out to find whether the problem lies with the hypothalamus or the pituitary.

Reply

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