Thyroid UK
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New to hypothyroidism!

Hi do I post results here for hypothyroidism diagnosed 2 months ago? I am getting more tired early in the evening, feeling colder, nails splitting, constipation, joints aching. Was prescribed levo, told by GP it would take some time to feel better/stabilise and that was it. :)

Thanks

DEC-2017 - diagnosis, prescribed 25mcg levothyroxine, increased to 50mcg 3 weeks later. Now taking 75mcg. Also prescribed vitamin D 800iu (Fultium/Desunin), 5mg folic acid, 210mg ferrous fumarate 3x a day.

Serum TSH - 38.8 mIU/L (0.2 - 4.2)

Serum Free T4 - 10.6 pmol/L (12 - 22)

Serum Ferritin - 15 ug/L (30 - 400)

Serum Vitamin B12 - 332 pg/L (190 - 900)

Serum Folate - 2.2 ug/L (2.5 - 19.5)

Total OH vitamin D - 34.4 nmol/L (25 - 50 deficiency. Supplementation is indicated)

OCT-2017 - patient registration, investigation into symptoms

Serum TSH - 0.87 mIU/L (0.2 - 4.2)

Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies - 503.4 IU/mL (<34)

OCT-2016 - repeat blood test

Serum TSH - 3.2 mIU/L (0.2 - 4.2)

Serum Ferritin - 47 ug/L (30 - 400)

AUG-2016 - symptoms of leg heaviness, crippling constipation which I was given Movicol for

Serum TSH - 5.4 mIU/L (0.2 - 4.2)

Serum Free T4 - 14.7 pmol/L (12 - 22)

Serum Ferritin - 26 ug/L (30 - 400)

12 Replies
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Welcome to our forum and I am glad your GP wasn't forthcoming as he might have given you info which wouldn't help.

Did he tell you that a blood test has to be done every six weeks, and you'd get an increase of 25mcg of levo each time until your TSH is 1 or lower (Unfortunately doctors seem to be unaware of the TSH at 1 as many seem to believe that when the TSH is 'somewhere' in the range (even 4 or 5) that we're on sufficient and don't increase. Which could mean our symptoms remain.

This is the procedure for tests - they have to be at the earliest possible so that might mean making it well beforehand so that you have the choice of time.

You also don't take levothyroxine before the test but afterwards.

Usually we take levo when we get up with one full glass of water and wait an hour before eating. Food interferes with the uptake of thyroid hormones.

The procedure for blood tests is - the earliest possible appointment, fasting (you can drink water) and allow a gap of 24hours between the last dose and test and take afterwards.

Some people prefer a bedtime dose - but you must have allowed about 2.5 to 3 hours if you've eaten so your stomach will be empty. You take levo after blood test and bedtime dose as usual the same day.

Doctors has to check B12, Vit D, iron, ferritin and folate as deficiencies an also cause symptoms.

Always get a print-out of the results with the ranges. Labs differ and so can machines so ranges can also be different and it allows members to comment.

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Thank you very much!! I had some trouble getting diagnosed for about 2 years beforehand due to fluctuating results. I had 4 sets of results, 3 were taken in the morning and 1 was taken in the afternoon. Oddly enough, the one that confirmed me hypothyroid was taken late morning and I drank coffee before the blood draw so goodness knows what my TSH would have been had I have bloods done early and fasting! I have had vitamins and minerals tested too, will post results since I know what they are. I am so new to this I didn't know what to write and how much!

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You can write what you want, especially if new as we don't know anything about hypo or how many clinical symptoms there are.

Doctors appear to know none at all these days, as symptoms are not learned and the blood test has superseded it as being 'perfect' but it isn't perfect and we have to do the following procedure in order to 'try' to get the best results we can.

First, the test has to be at the very earliest, fasting (you can drink water) and allow a gap of 24 hours from the last dose and the test and take levo afterwards. This helps keep the TSH at its highest and prevents the dose being reduced.

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Thank you very much, this is very helpful :)

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This might be helpful and I think you'll be surprised at how many symptoms there are - thankfully we don't get them all.

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/testin...

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I'm afraid I'd had a large bowl of porridge before my thyroid function test. Will know to fast in future . Thanks.

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I found that useful too. Thanks for advice for us new hypos.

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Yes, post results (include reference ranges) and give as much information as possible - what dose are you on, did you have thyroid antibodies tested, did you have vitamins and minerals tested, are you supplementing anything (say what and doses). Lots of members happy to help.

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Thank you very much!! I will add these to my post and let you know once this has been done! :)

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Results now added :)

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OK, so your Levo is being increased and Shaws has given you patient to patient tips about timing of blood tests, fasting, leaving off Levo, etc., and that the aim is to get TSH to around 1 or below and free Ts in the upper part of their ranges if that is where you feel well.

Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies - 503.4 IU/mL (<34)

So your raised antibodies confirm autoimmune thyroiditis aka Hashimoto's which is where antibodies attack the thyroid and gradually destroy it. The antibody attacks cause fluctuations in symptoms and test results.

Most doctors dismiss antibodies as being of no importance and know little or nothing about Hashi's and how it affects the patient, test results and symptoms. You need to read, learn, understand and help yourself where Hashi's is concerned.

You can help reduce the antibodies by adopting a strict gluten free diet which has helped many members here. Gluten contains gliadin (a protein) which is thought to trigger autoimmune attacks so eliminating gluten can help reduce these attacks. You don't need to be gluten sensitive or have Coeliac disease for a gluten free diet to help.

Supplementing with selenium l-selenomethionine 200mcg daily can also help reduce the antibodies, as can keeping TSH suppressed.

Gluten/thyroid connection: chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

stopthethyroidmadness.com/h...

stopthethyroidmadness.com/h...

hypothyroidmom.com/hashimot...

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

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Hashi's and gut absorption problems tend to go hand in hand and can very often result in low nutrient levels or deficiencies and we can see this in your vitamin and mineral results.

Serum Ferritin - 15 ug/L (30 - 400)

210mg ferrous fumarate 3x a day.

I assume that you have been diagnosed with iron deficiency anaemia to be taking ferrous fumarate 3 x daily. Make sure you are monitored and if your iron tablets are stopped in the future, keep an eye on your levels so that you don't fall back into iron deficiency again.

Take each iron tablet with 1000mg Vitamin C to aid absorption and help prevent constipaton. Always take iron 4 hours away from thyroid meds and two hours away from other medication and supplements as it will affect absorption.

For thyroid hormone to work (that's our own as well as replacement hormone) ferritin needs to be at least 70, preferably half way through range. You can help raise your level by eating liver regularly, maximum 200g per week due to it's high Vit A content, and including lots of iron rich foods in your diet apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/in... This is in addition to your ferrous fumarate as liver is a superfood and contains much more than just iron.

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Serum Vitamin B12 - 332 pg/L (190 - 900)

Serum Folate - 2.2 ug/L (2.5 - 19.5)

5mg folic acid

Were you checked for signs of B12 deficiency before starting folic acid? You can check here b12deficiency.info/signs-an... If you have any you need intrinsic factor antibodies testing to see if you have Pernicious Anaemia. Folic acid can mask signs of B12 deficiency so think back to before you started taking it. For further advice, ask on the Pernicious Anaemia Society forum healthunlocked.com/pasoc

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Total OH vitamin D - 34.4 nmol/L (25 - 50 deficiency. Supplementation is indicated)

800iu (Fultium/Desunin)

Well, unfortunately 800iu D3 daily wont raise your level, it's barely a maintenance dose for someone with a decent level to start with. However, with your level being 34.4 your GP's guidelines don't generally allow for more than that to be prescribed.

The Vit D Council recommends a level of 100-150nmol/L and you need far more than you are taking. I would suggest 10,000iu (or near) daily for 4 weeks then reduce to 5000iu (or near) daily for 8 weeks then retest, privately if necessary with a fingerprick blood spot test with City Assays vitamindtest.org.uk/

Once you've reached the recommended level then you'll need a maintenance dose which may be 2000iu daily, it's trial and error so it's recommended to retest once or twice a year to keep within the recommended range.

As you have Hashi's you should choose an oral D3 spray for better absorption, eg BetterYou.

Your doctor wont know, because they are not taught nutrition, but there are important cofactors needed when taking D3

vitamindcouncil.org/about-v...

D3 aids absorption of calcium from food and K2-MK7 directs the calcium to bones and teeth where it is needed and away from arteries and soft tissues where it can be deposited and cause problems.

D3 and K2 are fat soluble so should be taken with the fattiest meal of the day, D3 four hours away from thyroid meds.

Magnesium helps D3 to work and comes in different forms, check to see which would suit you best and as it's calming it's best taken in the evening, four hours away from thyroid meds

naturalnews.com/046401_magn...

Check out the other cofactors too.

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Please check out the reply by SlowDragon at the bottom of this thread, there are lots of links and useful information about gut/absorption problems with Hashi's and how to address them

healthunlocked.com/thyroidu...

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Hi, not checked for symptoms/signs of B12 deficiency. Will go to the other forum soon. Yes I have iron deficiency. Thanks

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