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Thyroid UK
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Thyroid peroxidase antibody 135 (<34)

Thyroglobulin antibody >2000 (<115)

Ferritin 15 (15 - 150)

Folate 2.2 (2.5 - 195.)

Vitamin B12 199 (180 - 900)

Vitamin D total 14.6 (<25 severe vitamin D deficiency. Patient may require pharmacological preparations)

anything I need to do about these please thankyou in advance

16 Replies
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Oh dear :(

I'll pop a reply on your other post in a minute but if your doctor hasn't done anything about these results he wants shooting.

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Ferritin 15 (15 - 150) - this is the at least 70 for thyroid hormone to work, the recommended level is half way through it's range.

Have you had an iron panel, full blood count and haemoglobin tested to see if you have iron deficiency anaemia? If not then ask for them to be done.

Speak to your doctor about this dire result and insist on treatment. If he tells you that you are in range then tell him that if your result was 14.9 you wouldn't be and he would have to treat you so 0.1 shouldn't make any difference.

You need at the very least iron supplements, preferably an iron infusion to bring your level up quickly.

If given iron tablets then take each tablet with 1000mg Vit C to aid absorption and help prevent constipation.

Take iron four hours away from thyroid meds and two hours away from any other medication and supplements as it affects their absorption.

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Folate 2.2 (2.5 - 195.)

Vitamin B12 199 (180 - 900)

You have folate deficiency and your B12 is very low.

Have you any signs of B12 deficiency listed here b12deficiency.info/signs-an...

Take these results, together with any signs and symptoms, over to the Pernicious Anaemia Society forum here on Health Unlocked for further advice. Include your ferritin result as well.

Don't supplement anything for folate or B12 yet, you may need testing for Pernicious Anaemia, you may need B12 injections.

See what they say on the PA forum then speak to your doctor.

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Vitamin D total 14.6 (<25 severe vitamin D deficiency. Patient may require pharmacological preparations)

The recommended level is 100-150nmol/L. The NICE Clinical Knowledge Summary for Vit D Deficiency can be seen here

cks.nice.org.uk/vitamin-d-d...

and the treatment suggestion is

"For the treatment of vitamin D deficiency, the recommended treatment is based on fixed loading doses of vitamin D (up to a total of about 300,000 international units [IU]) given either as weekly or daily split doses, followed by lifelong maintenance treatment of about 800 IU a day. Higher doses of up to 2000 IU a day, occasionally up to 4000 IU a day, may be used for certain groups of people, for example those with malabsorption disorders.

Several treatment regimens are available, including 50,000 IU once a week for 6 weeks (300,000 IU in total), 20,000 IU twice a week for 7 weeks (280,000 IU in total), or 4000 IU daily for 10 weeks (280,000 IU in total)."

So ask your doctor to check the guidelines for your area, which are probably the same, and insist he treats appropriately.

Come back and let us know what he prescribes because sometimes buying it yourself can be better.

There are important cofactors needed when supplementing with D3, which your doctor won't know about because they're not taught nutrition. Read about them here

vitamindcouncil.org/about-v...

D3 aids absorption of calcium from food and K2-MK7 directs the calcium to bones and teeth where it is needed and away from arteries and soft tissues where it can be deposited and cause problems.

D3 and K2 are fat soluble so should be taken with the fattiest meal of the day, D3 four hours away from thyroid meds.

Magnesium comes in different forms, check here to see which would suit you best and as it's calming it's best taken in the evening, four hours away from thyroid meds

naturalnews.com/046401_magn...

Check out the other cofactors too

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Thyroid peroxidase antibody 135 (<34)

Thyroglobulin antibody >2000 (<115)

These high antibodies confirm autoimmune thyroid disease aka Hashimoto's. This is where antibodies attack the thyroid and gradually destroy it. Hashi's isn't treated, it's the resulting Hypothyroidism that is.

You can help reduce antibodies by adopting a strict gluten free diet. Gluten contains gliadin which is a protein thought to trigger antibody attacks. Read about the gluten/thyroid connection here

chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

Supplementing with selenium L-selenomethionine 200mcg daily and keeping TSH suppressed also help reduce antibodies.

Read about Hashi's here:

stopthethyroidmadness.com/h...

stopthethyroidmadness.com/h...

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

2 likes
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thankyou doctor has said nothing about results and has referred me for counseling

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Tell him to stick his counselling up where the sun don't shine.

He is an utter and total idiot. The evidence is there. Tell him if he doesn't follow the guidelines for folate deficiency and severe Vit D Deficiency then you will make a formal complaint.

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ok will do thankyou

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Jeez, I'm so cross on your behalf.

Ask this tool of a doctor how counselling is going to raise your Vit D level and your folate level.

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An absolute a--hole! Sorry... How do such ignorant idiots manage to qualify?? What exams do they take? Patients' lives are being put at risk all the time... What's gone wrong or is it just me?

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JGBH I don't know what's gone wrong. I too wonder how they qualify. I wonder what they are taught and why such important things appear to either be left out or given no significance. How come patients know so much more about Hypothyroidism than the doctors?

At least, for those people who find the forum, there is knowledge to be passed on and a flicker of hope that their GP may be prompted to help, and if not we can at least help ourselves.

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SeasideSusie,

Indeed we are so lucky this forum and others exist. I don't know why it took me so long to find out about them, only became aware last year.

I mention the forum to everyone I see now (when appropriate) in order to empower people to try and get some treatment or ways of getting some treatment and investigations when we all feel so let down (abandoned?) by the medical professions.

I am rather impressed by your knowledge of supplements... and other members appear to understand a great deal too, so that allows us the "newbies" to further our research and understand. Thank you, and thank you to all of you.

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sorry forgot to add that yes complete blood count showed below range mcv and haemoglobin. also high mchc. iron panel showed iron and transferrin saturation percentage in range

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Low MCV and high MCHC can mean iron deficiency anaemia, low haemoglobin also points to anaemia.

The treatment might be iron tablets. You need to discuss this along with your ferritin level.

It might help if you found another doctor, this one will slowly kill you.

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ok I will go and see another doctor thankyou

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Sorry to hear about low vitamin D level, I have just been told I have a very low level like you,Doctor has put me on 50000 each week then retest after 6 weeks, I think I have been lucky to have a doctor who is willing to do something. Suffered from acky muscle's and colitis playing up, you need to get something sorted asap best of luck.

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Suggest if possible that you take a supportive friend or family member with you when you go to see hopefully a different GP, but especially if you have to see this GP.

It's essential to improve these vitamin levels

Keep reading on here - you will see many arrive with similar dire vitamins and poor care. This support group and knowledge can really help to give you the knowledge to improve your health

How long have you got to wait for coeliac testing? Not long one would hope. Presumably you are having an endoscopy

As you have Hashimotos you are very likely gluten intolerant, even if not coeliac. Going gluten free will help repair gut & improve low vitamin levels.

Isabella Wentz (from very good website about Hashimotos called The Thyroid Pharmacist.com) says about 80% of her patients find gluten free improves symptoms, but only 3% are officially diagnosed as coeliac.

Sadly many medics seem to be unaware of the gut or gluten connection, or the huge significance of low nutrients

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thankyou I have only just started doing the gluten challenge but doctors are aware I am undertaking the gluten challenge so I plan to go back 6-8 weeks later to get the celiac screen done. I had an endoscopy done 3 years ago to look into causes of difficulty swallowing and weight loss and I didn't do the gluten challenge then so I am guessing I will be going for another endoscopy once the gluten challenge is done?

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Best find out asap & ask that endoscopy be booked in

You don't want to be on gluten any longer than need be

You can be just as unwell with gluten intolerance, but there's no current test

Endoscopy is only real way of diagnosing coeliac.

Other possible issues with Hashimotos can be increased chance of gut infections like H Pylori, which can also be checked at same endoscopy .

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The cheap iron tablets that contain Iron Sulphate are not very good - the iron isn't easily absorbed and they can be very hard on the stomach. The best ones to take (if they work for you) are ferrous fumarate 210mg, which you can take 3 times a day. They are available from amazon and lots of other places if your doctor won't prescribe them. As with all your nutrients, you need to get your iron and ferritn (stored iron) levels up into the middle of the lab range at least, not just crawling into the bottom of the range.

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