Interpretation of results needed please

I am new, please could someone interpet my results. I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism in 2012 and have never felt right on Levothyroxine so T3 was introduced to improve conversion. Endo is happy with results, I am still suffering with symptoms so vitamins/minerals have been included as well.

Advice would be appreciated. I take 100mcg Levothyroxine and 5mcg T3 nd that was what I was taking at the time of below's blood test result.

Thank you

SEP-16

Serum TSH - 2.84 (0.2 - 4.2 mIU/L)

Serum free T4 - 15.7 (12.0 - 22.0 pmol/L)

Serum free T3 - 3.2 (3.1 - 6.8 pmol/L)

Thyroid peroxidase antibodies - 681 (<34 kIU/L)

Thyroglobulin antibodies - 755.3 (<115 kIU/L)

Serum ferritin - 9 (15 - 150 ng/L)

Serum vitamin B12 - 137 (180 - 900 pg/L)

Serum folate - 1.6 (2.5 - 19.5 ng/L)

Total 25 OH vitamin D - 29.6 (25 - 50 nmol/L vitamin D deficiency. Supplementation is indicated)

13 Replies
oldestnewest

Welcome to our forum and I'm sorry you have an Autoimmune Thyroid Disease called Hashimoto's due to you having high antibodies. Antibodies attack the thyroid gland until you become hypothyroid but the treatment is the same.

I don't see why your Endocrinologist is 'happy' with your results as anyone can see that your TSH is not around 1 (some need it lower and some suppressed).

You are on insufficient thyroid hormones as your FT4 and FT3 are low in range, and should be towards the upper part. These are too low:

Serum ferritin - 9 (15 - 150 ng/L)

Serum vitamin B12 - 137 (180 - 900 pg/L)

Serum folate - 1.6 (2.5 - 19.5 ng/L)

Total 25 OH vitamin D - 29.6 (25 - 50 nmol/L vitamin D deficiency. Supplementation is indicated)

How on earth can he be 'happy'. The aim of treatment is to remove all clinical symptoms. Your ferritin is below range, your B12 too, folate too. What has he suggested to you to increase these essential hormones/minerals?

Both B12 and Vit D are pro-hormones and essential to be towards the top of the range. B12 in particular to prevent dementia/alzeimers is now recommended to be around 1,000. To supplement you need B12 methylcobalamin sublingual tablets (can be bought through Amazon).

Others will come to your aid with suggestions to improve your other deficincies which could well be giving you additional symptoms.

Change your Endocrinologist. Self-education helps many members to recover their health somewhat.

4 likes
Reply

Thanks Shaws, the endo is not interested in what my vitamin or mineral results are. She has said since my GP ran the blood tests they are in charge of addressing the vitamin/mineral deficiencies, not her.

Reply

She could still have sent a note to your GP anyway. She didn't need to prescribe.

1 like
Reply

If you order anything from Amazon, supplements or anything else if you use the following Amazon Affiliate it can help defray some of Thyroiduk.org,uk's expenses.

healthunlocked.com/thyroidu...

1 like
Reply

Your endo is clearly clueless about hypothyroidism. :( I wish I could tell you that was unusual...

1 like
Reply

I think actually given your B12 level a test for pernicious anaemia might be in order. That B12 is very low. Do you suffer a lot from foggy thinking, pins and needles?

Reply

Thanks, here is a list of my symptoms:

pins and needles in fingers

brain fog

forgetfulness

tiredness

constipation

aches and pains

tinnitus

dry skin

hair loss

puffy eyes

cold intolerance

increased hunger

heavy periods

irregular periods

depression

anxiety

cold toes and feet

Reply

I'm not surprised! Your ferritin and your B12 levels are in your boots.

Have a look here about b12 deficiency. pernicious-anaemia-society....

3 likes
Reply

Blue33

Serum ferritin - 9 (15 - 150 ng/L)

Ask your GP to do a full iron panel to see if there is anything else going on besides low ferritin. You may need iron infusions. If you are prescribed iron tablets, take each one with 1000mg Vit C to aid absorption and help prevent constipation. Keep iron supplements four hours away from thyroid meds as it affects absorption.

Serum vitamin B12 - 137 (180 - 900 pg/L)

Serum folate - 1.6 (2.5 - 19.5 ng/L)

Ask your GP to test for Pernicious Anaemia. Get further advice from the Pernicious Anaemia Society forum here on Health Unlocked healthunlocked.com/pasoc Don't start any supplements for B12/Folate deficencies until you've had advice and testing.

Total 25 OH vitamin D - 29.6 (25 - 50 nmol/L vitamin D deficiency. Supplementation is indicated)

You need to buy some D3, my preference is for softgels. Buy some 5000iu strength and start with 10,000iu daily for 3-4 weeks then reduce to 5000iu daily. Retest in the Spring and if you have reached the recommended level of 100-150nmol/L reduce to 5000iu alternate days as a maintenance dose. Re-test once or twice a year to ensure you stay within the recommended range.

When taking Vit D we also need it's important co-factors K2-MK7 and magnesium.

vitamindcouncil.org/about-v...

D3 aids absorption of calcium from food and K2 directs the calcium to bones and teeth rather than arteries and soft tissues. D3 and K2 are fat soluble so should be taken with the fattiest meal of the day. Take D3 four hours away from thyroid meds.

Magnesium comes in different forms, check here to see which will suit you best and as it's calming it's best taken in the evening

naturalnews.com/046401_magn...

Your high antibodies mean that you are positive for autoimmune thyroid disease aka Hashimoto's. This is where the antibodies attack the thyroid and eventually destroy it. You can help reduce the antibodies by adopting a strict gluten free diet. Gluten contains gliadin which is a protein thought to trigger antibody attacks.

Gluten/Thyroid connection

chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

Hashi's Information

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

stopthethyroidmadness.com/h...

stopthethyroidmadness.com/h...

Supplementing with Selenium L-selenomethionine 200mcg daily can also help reduce antibodies as can keeping TSH very low or suppressed.

You should probably sack your endo and find one that knows what he's doing :(

4 likes
Reply

It is very important that you have your thyroid hormones increased now. You have to have either T4 or T3 increased as the aim is a TSH of 1 or lower. At present your TSH is nearly 3 and in some countries they would prescribe for a newly diagnosed hypothyroid patient when their TSH is 3+.

This is a list of clinical symptoms and if you were on an optimum of thyroid hormones you'd have none. Tick of your symptoms make an appointment and ask GP for an increase and you have enquired at the NHS Choices for advice/help about dysfunctions of the thyroid gland and they have advised that your dose needs to be raised and also vitamins/minerals have to be towards the top part of the range and not bottom. Deficiencies can also give you symptoms.

I think you are aware that blood test for thyroid hormones (in case GP wants to recheck) have to be at the very earelist and fasting and allow 24 hours between last dose and the test and take afterwards.

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

1 like
Reply

Hi I just sent a message to katepots which might be helpful. In reading these messages this is the first time I have ever heard of being given vitamins? I have never taken them

Reply

Low levels of nutrients often give symptoms very similar to Hypothyroidism. It's always recommended here to test them and supplement any deficiencies. Thyroid hormone (our own or replacement) can't work properly unless levels are optimal. Ferritin in particular needs to be a minimum of 70.

ThyroidUK's article on vitamins and minerals:

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/treatm...

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/get_in...

Reccommended levels are:

Vit D: 100-150nmol/L or 40-60ng/ml vitamindcouncil.org/i-teste...

B12: very top of range, even 900-1000 which is what the Pernicious Anaemia Society recommends

Folate: should be at least half way through it's range

Ferritin: half way through it's range

Reply

Thanks for that. I am a health professional not working now due to a range of illnesses but my nutrients are all ok as I ask for them to get checked now and again but I'd never heard of this affecting the thyroid. This is why I like these posts as you learn more from real people 😊

Reply

You may also like...