Wee small hours

Another fragmented night littered with strange dreams.

Every moning I wake at 0200 with the shakes 1/4 ltr water helps me get back to sleep. By 0400 the shakes wake me again and I feel hideous. I'm pretty well done with sleeping at this point. Rest but no sleep until 0630.

Once I've eaten a good breakfast and drunk 11/4 ltrs of fluid the shakes dissapear for the day. Does anyone else get this type of symptom? Or know if this is typical with thyroid / hashi please?

Thank you.

5 Replies

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  • Its not typical, but early in the morning, or rather when you sleep is when the adrenals recharge. To do this they need things like thyroid hormone, vitamins b and c.

    You might find out more about this over at ... rt3-adrenals.org

    G

  • I am on a very low dose of Levothyroxine and I have had a similar experience, which sent me to a and e a couple of days ago as I couldn't stop my heart from racing even with fluids. I was only diagnosed in June so it's early days but the GP is testing me diabetes too.

  • I wake after an hour or so ....sometimes i've been dreaming....heart rate thumping and passing uine like no tomorrow! Happened again last week with pulse erratic ...177 bpm. Good idea to get yourself checked out......i ended up in A&E with AF. Good luck.

  • Thanks ladies,

    I've been though A&E with bradytcardia and tachycardia. Spent 2 and half weeks in hospital. I was very very ill. Did every test except TPO ab although I requested they look at this, the consultant dismissed my request. Sunsequently my GP retested and they were 491.

    Since adopting a gluten free and very clean diet, organic, fruit veg meat eggs fish nuts no tea, coffee or booze things have improved. I've a very sweet tooth but I've cut out refined sugar, still take honey, maple syrup and fruit based sugars in their natural form which is still a problem. I think but I'll take where I am at the moment without any meds. But I'm terrified of going on any as I fear that a doctor will screw things up for me!

  • Which is why you have to learn about the types of thyroid hormone replacment available to you, and how to dose, for yourself. Very few of us can trust our doctors to get it right. We have to take control. Even if we Don't go as far as self-treating, we have to be able to guide our doctors in terms they understand. And the worst possible thing you can do is not take the treatment.

    What is the worst thing that can happen? In all probablility, it will be that he Under-treats you. Refuses to do the right tests, and/or to increase your dose far enough to make you well. As long as you know what the right tests are and when you need an increase, you can take matters into your own hands. He's not going to kill you!

    Another scenario is that he prescribes drugs to treat your symptoms. In which case, it's down to you to research them before you take them, find out what the side-effects are and if they're likely to interact with your hormone, and decide for yourself whether you want to take them. He can't force you.

    Come on, Mike! You can do this! Every journey starts with just one step. Take that step now, and start the treatment. :)

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