Abbreviations and Acronyms

Abbreviations and Acronyms

All too often people post using various abbreviations and acronyms. Unfortunately, all too often other people don't understand them!

Ideally, everyone would carefully use the full words in their posts, at least for the first mention. However, we live in a real world where people don't realise what they are doing.

Until everyone does that, this document might help:

dropbox.com/s/og3lmxa1dqadb...

Rod

For anyone reading this:

My Abbreviations and Acronyms document is permanently being enhanced. If you have not recently downloaded a copy, please feel free to download it again. There have been at least ten updates this year - so far. :-)

25 Replies
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Thanks great idea

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Thankyou. Although I am a retired nurse, I had no idea what most of the abbreviations meant! Perhaps it would be better if everyone wrote it out fully , I usually try to do so.

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Yes, I'm guilty of moving on if I come across abbreviations I don't understand!

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Could the abbreviations and acronyms be pinned, Rod?

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Eyes right! :-)

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Lol. Well done that man :)

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Yes Clutter,good idea.

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Eyes right! :-)

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We could save a lot of time and confusion by using the full words :)

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Cant find what pm is

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Did you check the download document and not find PM in it?

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Personal message. Here’s hoping you know by now.

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Does no one else just google the more oblique abbreviations? Or ask for clarification?

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Thoughts like that have struck me sometimes. :-)

But when people are brain-fogged and at the end of a slow connection on a low-end computer, I do have sufficient empathy to keep going with my document.

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Thanks Rod, I have found this document finally, newish to all this! Still not sure about this NDT. Why are doctors seemingly reluctant to prescribe this? Am I being a bit thick here! 😊 Xx

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Desiccated thyroid is not a licensed medicine in the UK. Although, in some theoretical way, doctors are responsible for everything they prescribe, there is some off-loading of that responsibility if the medicine has a product licence.

Back in the 1980s, the UK Thyroid BP product was removed from the British Pharmacopoeia and disappeared from the market. The medical establishment seemed convinced, without a single proper trial, that levothyroxine was a better, more stable and perfectly acceptable alternative.

At that time, it is quite possible that desiccated thyroid did vary in potency rather more than it should. Since then, current day products are often well-regarded - certainly no worse than the levothyroxine products which have had so many issues over the years.

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Thanks for that Helvella, can you tell me why levothyroxine products have had so many issues over the years please?

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Yes and no.

From a UK perspective, the last levothyroxine product to disappear from the market was Teva levothyroxine. In that case, the manufacturer used an unapproved ingredient which resulted in the product failing to deliver its claimed dosage.

(The ingredient was dextrin which exists in many different forms. They changed which one they used but did not, so it seems, check whether it affected absorption in humans. Whilst the tablets contained the correct amount of levothyroxine, they held onto some of it so under-dosed patients.)

Synthroid has a history of recalls. For example, they can't even get the right dosage pills into the right labelled packaging:

fiercepharma.com/supply-cha...

It does seem to be the case that manufacture of levothyroxine is a tricky thing to get right. But the companies have been churning out untold millions of them for years. You might have expected them to work out how to do so reliably by now.

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Sorry didn't know will change it

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Thank you. Good idea.

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Thanks Helvella, undefined abbreviations and acronyms are one of my pet peeves, they drive me crazy!

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I do my very best to avoid most of them. Even to the extent of typing "micrograms" in full.

Hope it is useful.

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Yes, that's a good idea since it's hard to get a "mu" out of your keyboard.

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Good idea, thank you.

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Good idea, thank you.

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