“Overdue” a mammogram?!: Hello Ladies... - SHARE Metastatic ...

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“Overdue” a mammogram?!

SophSP
SophSP

Hello Ladies,

I don’t know whether to laugh, cry or get angry about this! But I’ve just had the most bizarre phone call from the hospital where I was originally diagnosed to let me know I am overdue my mammogram! When I explained that I have breast cancer, the lady went on to say that when I am done with treatment I can have it done. I told her it’s metastatic, but she still didn’t get it. Then I said I won’t be done with treatment. Then I think the penny finally dropped. I don’t understand why I am receiving a “reminder” about having a mammogram when the diagnosis should already be in my file. I’ve even had nurses call me to check on how I’m doing, as I don’t get treated there.

I just don’t know what to think. Maybe I was a bit overly sensitive, but you would think someone who works in radiology would understand that someone with metastatic breast cancer is not going to benefit from a mammogram. I’m long past that. Sorry, but I just needed to vent.

Sophie

78 Replies
oldestnewest

Hi Sophie,

I had an appointment letter come through last year. I phoned the hospital up and they receptionist/appointment department just said ok we will leave it for now. I also had the same response from the Bowel Testing Cancer unit.

I just think it’s lack of communication between departments. Nobody checks the records before phoning or sending out letters. Totally insensitive. We are just a number.

I have a Nurse call me every month to see how I am but I have nothing to tell her. She sees my reports online. I’m to polite and she is to nice for me to say pee off.

I can fully understand your anger. Same ole same ole for us. We have to go with it.

Have a good weekend.

Cheryl

Hi Cheryl,

Thanks for your response. I don’t really see how it can be lack of communication between departments though, as that is the department where I had my mammogram, ultrasound and first biopsy.

Perhaps you can ask the nurse to call less often? If there’s nothing much to share, it must be a bit awkward always having the same conversation.

Enjoy your weekend too,

Sophie

Mine was a different hospital but under the same umbrella Sophie. I will ask my nurse not to call so often. She is so nice though. There is moments of silence as I don’t know what to say. It is awkward.

🥺🙏🏼

I think you are making the right decision about asking the nurse to call less often. Maybe she is trying to give you a boost by calling so often.

Sophie 😁

Hi Sophie. I understand your frustration but due to FOIP Act your diagnosis would never be seen by the receptionist people who call to book those appointments. As long as you remain in the general system reminders will get flagged for them to call and they have no idea of your diagnosis. Honestly I don't want every department to know my health record. As a nurse I guess this is important to me and I totally understand. Don't take this internally as they are just doing their job.

Sandra

SophSP
SophSP in reply to girlsptz

Hi Sandra,

Yes, I’m sure you are right. I hadn’t considered that the receptionist probably doesn’t have access to my records that mention my diagnosis, but even after I told her she was arguing with me about having a mammogram. She didn’t seem to get it when I told her about my diagnosis. I felt bad when I got off the phone. I didn’t like being reminded what it was like in the very beginning.

Sophie

I feel the same! Just a number and $! That is what it is!

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Zebra2018

Thank you!

Yes Sophie, I have had numerous calls for an overdue mammogram. The fact that it doesn’t work for women with dense breasts further annoys me! I just tell the girl I’ll call for an appointment...then don’t!

Stay safe,

Maura

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Tam-56

Hi Maura,

I didn’t realise how common it was for those of us diagnosed with breast cancer to keep receiving reminders about mammograms. The irony is that I wouldn’t normally be receiving reminders anyway because of my age! Now I actually have the disease I’m being reminded of a preventative procedure! By the way, my breasts are dense too, so it was hard to spot the tumour.

Sophie

Hidden
Hidden

Hi , Once I was diagnosed with primary breast cancer in 2012 I was taken out of the system after a routine mammogram letter issued . I explained I had / have BC so would be following up each year with my oncologist . Never heard from them again . The same with cervical check and Bowel screening since my mbc diagnosis I’m out of the loop ! Personally , I’m happier with that , I prefer a one stop shop so to speak . ❤️

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Hidden

Hi Kevina,

Thanks for your response. I will probably have a word with the radiology department and explain everything to them in person.

Sophie

Hidden
Hidden in reply to SophSP

BTW I’m in awe how you remember all our “real names”

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Hidden

Thanks. I try! I’m still working on that though! 😂😂

Hidden
Hidden

Think that’s a good idea . As an aside I was on a zoom call last night with my book club . They all know my diagnosis but I was caught in the headlights when I was asked when my treatment was finishing !!! They all told me I looked great and my hair was fab . It’s sh.t . My hair that is . I explained I was going to be on treatment for life . Cue well what did you think of the book 📚 😂

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Hidden

Oh boy! I bet that was an awkward moment. I had a friend ask me the same thing the other day and I also told her that I will be in treatment for life.

Sophie 😄

Hidden
Hidden

Do you want to know the books ? 😂

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Hidden

Go on then! 😂😂😂

Hidden
Hidden in reply to SophSP

Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell , based around Shakespeare’s Family . Great read . The Tainted was the other one based in India in 1920 ‘s Anglo Indians and Black and Tans back in Ireland .

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Hidden

The books sound interesting!

I was asked the same thing about a year ago and I was shocked and angry because after 2013, my insurance stopped giving me reminders to have a mammogram and when I asked my primary doctor she said I didn’t need it anymore because I was 74 years old. Then 5 years later I was diagnosed mbc. So, when I was reminded to have a mammogram, I told her she was 5 years too late. I still get a reminder, but now I just ignore it, but it’s still irritating. I feel “normal” when I see my primary doctor, talking of minor aches and pains, until the nurse comes in and mention mammogram, really?

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Semple

Hi,

I can understand your frustration. You have every reason to feel that way after the way you were treated. You were told that you were "too old" for mammograms, and I was (and still am) considered "too young" for them!

If I hadn't had a mammogram in 2018 when I found a lump I would not have lived long enough for a routine appointment to be offered. I try to look forward rather than back. But I did feel like I took a step back today. The phone call from the hospital unnerved me.

Sophie

I was still getting reminders too. As soon as I contacted my original breast consultant to get my name taken off the system I found a lump in my unaffected breast. My Oncologist told me that it was likely to be cancer but it wouldn’t be picked up on ct scan. I eventually had an ultrasound and was told it was just a fatty lump. Perhaps if I’d just gone for the mammogram that might have been spotted earlier!

Incidentally, was part of a research programme in when I was 47, despite telling the radiographer and asking her to note an unusual crease, my primary breast cancer wasn’t identified. Though when the breast consultant reviewed that mammogram 9 months later she could see it, though it’s position made it difficult to see.

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Julie2233

Hi Julie,

It’s hard to say what could have been, isn’t it? When I had a mammogram and they couldn’t tell what it was exactly. The ultrasound was clearer, with the “strong possibility” that it was breast cancer, but it was the first biopsy that confirmed the diagnosis.

Sophie

Julie2233
Julie2233 in reply to SophSP

I don’t think we can do what ifs, it’s too pointless. 😊 I saw my gp 4 times before being referred and had a ‘clear’ mammogram. But I am where I am 🙂

Yes I trust the scan far more than the mammogram.

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Julie2233

I agree with you, Julie. I try not to dwell on the “what ifs” either, because that won’t change anything. I’ve been having regular CT scans since my diagnosis, so I trust them too.

Sophie

Hi Sophie

I just received a mammogram appointment in the post last week and I don’t know what to do with it! My initial reaction was how insensitive it was but then I’ve come to realise that the NHS isn’t very joined-up.

My last one was all clear and that was 7 weeks before I was diagnosed de novo MBC!

I’ve never had a PET scan so wonder if I should have the mammogram... 🤔

SophSP
SophSP in reply to stardust1965

Hi,

I would be inclined to call and have your name taken off the list. I’m not sure what good the mammogram would do, as it’s a preventative procedure. Our oncologists go by CT scan results to see how we are doing. I’ve had one PET CT scan, just days before meeting my oncologist.

Sophie

stardust1965
stardust1965 in reply to SophSP

Thanks Sophie, I’m not sure it would do any good either but will check with my oncologist next week during my phone consultation. I can then ask to be removed from the mammogram screening programme if that’s what she suggests. It felt like a bit of a slap in the face to receive the appointment letter. I hate those unexpected kind of reminders, the what-ifs... Have a good weekend.

SophSP
SophSP in reply to stardust1965

You’re welcome. I agree with checking with your oncologist. She will probably advise you to take your name off the breast screening programme. It is a slap in the face to receive a reminder, even though it is well intentioned. I felt like I had gone back to square one when this whole thing first began.

Enjoy your weekend,

Sophie

I’m a bit behind on here , but on reading these posts , I wondered what your oncologist said about mammogram screening , as I continue to have an annual mammogram on my non -affected left breast ( with agreement of my onc) x

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Teddielottie

Hi Teddie,

I'm not seeing my oncologist until November, but I saw my GP on Tuesday for my zoladex injection and he agrees that I don't need a mammogram.

Sophie

Teddielottie
Teddielottie in reply to SophSP

Hi Sophie! I had my first virtual appointment with my onc today and had a few questions for her . She said she would schedule my next ct scan for December ( that will be 9 months since my last one , so I take this as a good sign ... ). I asked her about my annual mammogram on my left so far non -affected side and she wants me to continue to have it as a ct scan wouldn’t pick it up ... she even said that , given that my bc is well controlled, if there was any cancer spotted early in that breast , she would consider a small op . So it looks like it does vary between different oncologists and different people . I also asked about genome testing and she said it wasn’t currently available on NHS , but I could consider it privately if wished , but she did add that whatever the testing recommends as the next treatment, it still has to be available on NHS . x

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Teddielottie

Hi Teddie,

I had a virtual consultation with my oncologist over the summer, and I actually felt more relaxed sitting in my living room than I do in her consulting room. That's good that there is such a long gap between appointments! My oncologist wanted to leave it for six months before seeing me again, but I didn't feel comfortable leaving it so long, so she is seeing me in November after four and a half months.

It's strange how different doctors feel about having mammograms. Maybe I should call my oncology nurses tomorrow and get my oncologist's view. She might feel differently to my GP.

I wonder why you were told genomic testing is not available on the NHS? I had mine done on the NHS, so that's not right! Maybe it varies across the UK, but I definitely had it done for free on the NHS. My oncologist was on board and put the referral through for me very soon after I brought it up. The hospital where I was referred to sat on it for a while, so I had to chase it. But the original referral was put through immediately.

Sophie

Teddielottie
Teddielottie in reply to SophSP

Yes the virtual appointment worked well and I too felt relaxed at home . I did read somewhere that there was a trial and they wanted lots of people to do the genome tests , but that numbers had now been met , so were no longer freely available ? I could pay and go private if I decide I want to go ahead with it in the future, but will put it off for timebeing. x

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Teddielottie

Hi Teddie,

Yes, perhaps that’s what happened. Maybe I got in before the tests were closed. I would definitely recommend having genomic testing done if you can in future.

Sophie

I was told I don’t need a mammogram (which are preventative) because the MRI and NM bone scans now cover it. I was advised to remove my name from the routine screening mammogram list which I’ve done. I feel comfortable with that as my pre MBC mammogram never picked up anything anyway. Hope this is helpful.

Oh Sophie,

I'm sorry. It is unsettling, and so many people don't understand why. We work so hard to "carry on" as if nothing is wrong....largely to keep from upsetting those around us. Then, to be put in that situation by the very system that cares for us is too much.

I remember visiting the surgeon who did my bilateral mastectomy just weeks after surgery. Her resident came in holding my chart, and the first thing out of her mouth was, had I brought my most recent mammogram with me? I asked her what exactly were they supposed to have imaged? She laughed after seeing my drains and said, "Yeah, I guess there wouldn't be much to see." I left and never returned. Ugh

I hope you and your family are doing well. Your ability to support them as well as all the women on the board while caring for yourself is damn impressive!

Andi

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Arisgram

Hi Andi,

That was an insensitive way to be treated by the surgeon’s resident. You were right there, not at the end of the phone. More care and consideration should have been shown. It shouldn’t take long to do your homework and see if the next patient needs to come in with the results of a mammogram or not. I don’t blame you for not wanting to return.

My family and I are doing well, thanks! My dad has had a list of DIY jobs he needed doing which my husband took care of last night when he got home from work. We’re going to relax and have an enjoyable Bank Holiday weekend.

Have a good weekend,

Sophie

Enjoy your weekend!

Well I do get that, I whooped with joy at my clear mammogram in March then within a month was told I'd got MBC. I think there's lots of people doing paperwork and calls who have no idea but that's pretty insensitive. Deep breath...do something nice!

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Beryl71

Hi Carolyn,

Thanks for the words of encouragement! Enjoy your weekend. It’s looking a bit grotty outside right now, but hopefully the sun will come out soon.

Sophie

I get a mammogram and ultrasound every year. I was told as long as I have breasts I need a mammogram. Last year I even had a MRI of my breasts.

I am presently NED and hope to live a long time.....I still continue to follow up with all my preventative care. IE dermatological skin checks, colonoscopy’s, Pap smears etc.

I understand why many would be confused about the mammogram but it’s not impossible for “us” to develop another kind of breast cancer. I had a 1.3 percent chance of my stage one becoming metastatic and it did.... so I’m leaving nothing to chance.

SophSP
SophSP in reply to HopeinNJ

Hi,

That's interesting. I was never told I would need another mammogram after I was diagnosed. I have heard that there is the possibility of a second cancer developing in the healthy breast, but I would have thought a CT scan would pick up anything new. I'll have to ask about that. I also follow up with preventative care such as cervical screening, and I have my flu and other vaccinations that are needed too.

Sophie

Staysha
Staysha in reply to HopeinNJ

I thought the same as everyone. I have scans all the time. Why do I need a mammogram? But my onc said I should on the one breast I have left. So I did.

He also told me to have a colonoscopy. I’ve had to put that off because of the virus. Oh well... I trust him so I do (mostly) what he thinks I should.

:)Stacy

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Staysha

Hi Stacy,

I’m seeing my GP on Tuesday for my zoladex injection so I shall ask her opinion. If she’s not sure then I might go ahead and call my oncology nurses and see what they have to say. I don’t mind taking preventative measures, but I didn’t think there was any point in having mammograms anymore after getting this diagnosis.

Sophie

I understand your frustration. I was seen by a "fill-in" oncologist at my previous practice. Never told me who he was, why I was seeing him, so awkward. I had to ask him.

Him: "Do you get regular mammograms?"

Me: "I had a bilateral mastectomy."

Him: "Ok, then. Do you do regular breast self exams?"

Me: "Um, I had a bilateral mastectomy."

It didn't get any better from there. Seriously questioned whether or not the guy actually worked there, LOL!! Scary & sad. Happy to say I've moved on to a reputable practice in Boston.

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Shelly1009

Hi Shelly,

I don’t know what to say! What part of “bilateral mastectomy” did the oncologist not understand? Good grief!! 😂😂😂

Sophie

I just received my letter to make an appointment for my mammogram in October. My oncologist wanted me to have it last year. I was diagnosed with MBC in March of 2019. After reading all the comments I will ask my oncologist if I really need to continue to have mammograms. Good luck to all of us in our journey.

SophSP
SophSP in reply to cpidacks

Hi,

I would go ahead and ask your oncologist what you should do. If mine says I should have a mammogram I will do it in a heartbeat, but I really don’t think it’s necessary.

Sophie

Well, here's one! I have 2 oncs. One here in Vegas for shots and one in Chicago for tests. The one in Vegas would ask if I'd had my yearly mammogram. I finally asked her what she would recommend should they find something. That put that question to rest. The one in Chicago assured me at this point, I don't need one.

SophSP
SophSP in reply to diamags

Hi,

I sometimes wonder whether doctors actually read their patients’ files before consultations. It would probably save us from having to have these conversations! I’m glad you had got it sorted.

Sophie

It’s annoying! Every time I go to the doctors office or call they would tell me I’m overdue for my mammogram. I’m with Kaiser Permanente in Northern California and apparently their computer system will not allow them to remove the reminder. You’d think some computer programmer there would be able to fix it. They were able to remove the reminder for Pap test. Crazy!

SophSP
SophSP in reply to gerisplace

Hi Geri,

I would find that very annoying too. Can you mention it to them again? I suppose you will continue to receive reminders so long as the computer system keeps generating them.

Sophie

Hi Sophie, I understand your frustration at the medical system. I was diagnosed with bilateral breast cancer in 2015 and had lumpectomies. So I still get a diagnostic mammogram every year even though I was stage four out the gate. I’ve been NED for two years so as a retired nurse I like to feel that I’m staying on top of when those nasty CA cells go active again. I just had another round of bone scan and ct scan to make sure it’s not growing again as my markers are inching their way back up. So I guess my point is, due to OSHA rules the folks making the calls don’t know your diagnosis. The nurses are just doing what the system tells them. I admit the system has many flaws but for the most part they do try. Take care of yourself, Cathy

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Hokie

Hi Cathy,

Thanks for sharing your personal insight.

Take care,

Sophie

Oh Mama mia.... so sorry Sophie. It is a shame that some people dont better educate themselves especially in their line of work... I hope you are laughing about this now as I saw you posted this yesterday.... enjoy the weekend... by the way, I ordered a acupuncture mat after our last conversation via posts! Waiting foe it to come so I can try it out carefully of course! I dont want to inflict any self pain with those sharp bits! Also just watched the movie The Queen on this lazy rainy Saturday here in New Jersey! Faith

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Have-faith

Hi Faith,

I'm not laughing, but I am not crying either, so I'll be OK! Let me know what you think of your acupressure mat. I love mine. I hope you enjoyed The Queen. It's been a rainy day here today too. It seems like summer is over and autumn is already here!

My husband and I spent ages getting new phones today. Our contract was up in March, but of course with this pandemic this is something else we couldn't take care of until today. So we have been busy downloading our apps and getting our phones just the way we want them.

Enjoy your weekend,

Sophie

A similar thing happened to me. My doctor obviously knows that I have not had breasts since the nineties ànd that I am being treated for a recurrence in my chest wall. However, I received an email saying that I am overdue for a mammogram from someone in the office. She went on to say that early detection increases good outcomes and on and on...

I was annoyed and felt invisible, and I too wasn't sure if I should scream or cry.

I emailed her back and explained my situation and asked her to be more careful in the future. She was very apologetic . I understand your feelings completely.🤔

Hi Maddy,

That email must have felt like a kick in the teeth, especially the lecture about “outcomes”. I think you did the right thing by responding in the way you did, and by explaining your situation. Hopefully it will make her more sensitive in future and not assume that women who ignore screenings are just burying their heads in the sand. There are other reasons why they don’t attend screenings and this is one of those occasions.

Sophie

Hi Sophie,

I still receive reminders, so I asked my oncologist to call to take me off the “list”. The irony is my mammogram before my dx was clear.

xo Jade

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Wintervt

Hi Jade,

I think that’s a good idea asking to have your name taken off the list. I remember my mum continuing to receive hospital appointment letters even after she had died and my dad being told off for allowing her to miss appointments! Talk about insensitive! He had a word with them and that put an end to that.

Sophie

I get reminders about mammograms too. From Stanford, where I am currently being treated for MBC. I wish they could keep better track of this--it really is very insensitive. On the bright side, not needing mammograms is a silver lining of MBC!

Hi Michel,

Thank you! I think it's insensitive too. I'm sure staff don't mean to cause us any distress, but if they could just put themselves in our shoes I'm sure things would be done a lot differently.

Sophie🌷

I don’t blame you for being upset. The second you said you had breast cancer she should have said sorry and hung up the phone instead of pushing you. I find people on the phone and sometimes during appointments don’t really listen to what you say. I hope you feel better after venting 😉

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Sarcie

Hi Sarah,

Thank you for your support! I really appreciate it. I do feel better after venting and talking about it.

Sophie 💐

Well, here's a take from the far left field, I had the complete opposite response to yours Sophie, and what appears to be the majority of ladies who have commented.

My first ONC never mentioned having an annual mammogram and ultra sound if needed.

When I requested a new ONC that was a breast cancer specialist, she immediately had me scheduled for a yearly mammogram.

I thought what the heck, why didn't my first ONC request a mammogram?!

I thought how dare he not recommend a yearly mammogram.

As you may know, I was diagnosed with de novo MBC in my bones in March 2018.

The speck of a tumor in my right breast has significantly reduced down to 0.8 cm X 0.6 cmX 0.7cm.

I'm all about having a yearly mammogram, as I have found it to be informative and encouraging.

I feel blessed to have the lease aggressive type of MBC: HER- PR+,ER+

I'm still on Ibrance and Femora.. no generics.

So far it's doing well, however, I keep a close eye on how the hormonal chemo impacts my liver.

I have had my Bone Scans and CT Scans my 1st year every 3 months, my 2nd year every 4 months, and now I requested every 5 months for the first time.

Because, I'm a nut about the chemicals impacting my, you got it , my Liver.

Those scans will be at the end of Sept.

on a side note, I met a lady last month when I went in for my monthly labs, who was diagnosed 14 years ago with the same type of de novo MBC I have and her's was discovered the same way as mine, by a broken bone.

If I were you, but I'm not, I would have a mammogram to compare it to the last one you had.

sending lots of Love,

Sue

SophSP
SophSP in reply to JoyBe

Hi Sue,

Thanks so much for sharing your insight and offering some advice. I really appreciate it. You have given me something to think about.

Take care,

Sophie

Hidden
Hidden

I just have to ask, I have had yearly mammograms on my non-cancerous breast every year. Do we stop getting them once we are diagnosed with MBC?

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Hidden

Hi Sharon,

I would imagine so. I am seeing my GP tomorrow for my monthly zoladex injection, so plan to ask her. I just thought that once we are diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer, mammograms were no longer necessary as we are having regular CT scans to check on how we are getting along.

Sophie

Hidden
Hidden

Oh, well, that would make sense!

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Hidden

I'll let you know what my GP has to say.

Shelby4now
Shelby4now in reply to SophSP

Hi. I thought I would share my mammogram experience. When I found out I had bc in 2009 on my right breast I received rad and chemo. All was going well until 2015 when i was having my yearly mammograms and found BC in my left breast + mbc . This time was only radiation. In 2018 was my first pet scan that showed activity in my right breast again and

numerous lesions on my spine and bones. My last pet scan results in August was bc is back in my right breast again since I have been on bravnav I guess they use the pet scan in place of mammograms. I get a pet scan every 4 months. The oncologist informed me they would not remove the lump anyways. Take care all ...I wish you all health ,happiness and peace

Shelby

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Shelby4now

Hi Shelby,

Thanks for sharing your experience. I have only had one PET CT scan, which was offered while I was going through the diagnostic stage, and the only mammogram I have ever had was when I first went to see my GP about the lump. I would not have been offered a routine mammogram otherwise, as I am considered too young.

Sophie

Hi Sophie I still go for my regular mammograms as there is always the risk of a second primary. I understood that a mammogram is more detailed than a CT body scan so not taking any chances. My body clearly knows how to grow cancer and could easily do it again.

SophSP
SophSP in reply to Scandia68

Hi Anne,

You brought out a good point. I hadn't really thought too much about developing a second primary. But that is a possibility too. After reading your comment I went ahead and called my oncology nurse line. There was no one to answer my call, so I left a message for them to call me back. Maybe it would be a good idea to have continue having mammograms.

Sophie

God help me! You obviously know something I don.t and then some.

I am scheduled for a mammogram, very soon. That is along with a sonogram and MRI of my breasts. I have had bilateral breast cancer, two different kinds, diagnosed 2015. Last year,2019, I had recurrent breast cancer, then cryogenic surgery on the left breast and then, at on New Year´´s Eve, a liver lesion biopsy testing positive. Way back in November, 2014, I had got a letter from the hospital, results from a mammo, with a big bold message near the top, noting NEGATIVE. Down near the bottom, in small letters, it stated that dense breasts may obscure malignancies. At the next juncture, when the sky fell in, in June of 2015, It was noted in the reports that I had dense breasts and sometimes it is noted that I have extremely dense breasts, what is left of them.

Those mammograms are horrid, radiation producing and meaningless for me. PLEASE tell me how to get away from having them. Give me the magic words.

SophSP
SophSP in reply to jersey-jazz

Hi,

I would just call them up and say you don't need another mammogram. What do they hope to see considering your medical history? I have dense breasts too, which may have made it hard to spot the cancer. I had my first breast examination when I was 23 as part of my immigration medical, along with a chest x-ray, which were both clear. But I do remember the doctor mentioning that I had lumpy breasts. Then I had another breast exam when I was about 30 during a cervical screening appointment, and there was nothing suspicious then that I was aware of. So the cancer must have started growing from my early 30s onwards, as I was 39 when I was diagnosed.

Sophie

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