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CT scan

Hello Ladies,

I had my CT scan this afternoon. I don't normally have any issues. I go to the hospital, have the cannula inserted and then in I go for my scan. But while the nurse was trying to find a vein I felt like a pin cushion. Two veins collapsed. Then she asked if I was normally such "trouble". I said "no" and had to listen as she said that a doctor or someone else would have to try and find a vein. So I was sent back into the waiting room with two plasters on my arms. I wanted to cry. I couldn't believe how I felt! I finally had my scan. One of the technicians found a vein and was much more sympathetic. But when I had the cannula removed a different nurse made a comment about my difficult veins too. I couldn't button it any longer and told her it was not my fault. I am having my Zometa infusion on Friday. I just hope this doesn't happen again.

Sophie

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Oh Sophie! I'm so sorry to hear some of the nurses were so insensitive, that is just bad form. I didn't have my regular nurse last month and was stuck six times, it was awful! Sending you a virtual hug!

xo Jade

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Hi Jade,

Thank you! The thing is, the first nurse came across in a friendly manner and even seemed cheerful at first until the bit about being "trouble". Then I felt like I was being blamed for my veins not co-operating. Hardly my fault! I'm sorry to hear you were stuck six times! I wish I had some kind of comeback. It's not as if I relish these appointments. My mum died in that hospital and I have to go there for CT scans and to see my oncologist.

Sophie x

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Dear Sophie,

I agree it is not your fault, I see it a deficit on their part as they are supposed to be trained! It must be tough going to the same hospital that your mum passed in, I can't imagine. If you don't mind me asking how long ago did she pass? My dad passed away 4 years ago of prostate cancer and not a day goes by that I don't think about him.

xo Jade

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Thank you, Jade. You have been so kind and so have the other ladies! I try not to compare my cancer journey to my mum's, but it's hard not to. Since my own diagnosis I now know how my mum must have felt, except for the fact that I have not had chemotherapy. But I get the rest of it. I look back and have more insight into her experiences. So now when someone says something about how my husband is coping I can see how he must feel because I have also been the relative of someone who had cancer. But even now, I feel more drawn to others who have had cancer themselves, rather than their family members. Only other cancer patients know what it's like living with cancer in their bodies, not their spouses, children or others.

Sophie

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Morning Jade,

Sorry, I missed your question from yesterday. My mum died in 2004 from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. I'm sorry to hear about your dad. It's hard, isn't it? I think about my mum every day too. I sometimes wonder how she would have felt if she knew I have cancer too.

Sophie ❤

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Sophie I'm so sorry for how your day went. When I had my CT a month ago they had to poke me 3 times too and I know I have great veins. It was frustrating for sure and I am on heavy dose blood thinners to prevent another pulmonary embolism so trust me I was bruised pretty badly after that.....actually still am.

Try and clear your mind abut your infusion on Friday. I had no issues last week when I went for mine. Of course I was very direct with the nurse about what size and where to put the IV and she got it on the first go. They all know I'm a nurse so I can be bossy and get away with it..lol. Positive thoughts that all will go well. Make sure you are super well hydrated before you go for IV starts. Both these things doesn't require any fasting at all. Take care.

Sandra

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Hi Sandra,

Thanks for the advice and tips. I don't think it's fair for us to be treated like human pin cushions and then having to put up with snide remarks on top of that! What gives the nurses a right to act like that? You must have come up with some really bad bruises. My mum used to take Warfarin and she bruised easily too. The bruises were awful.

I always drink a lot (3 litres each day) so I don't think it was a hydration issue today. I was feeling very cold though. I felt like an ice block, so I wonder if that's why the nurse couldn't find a vein?

Thanks again!

Sophie x

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I am sorry you had such a bad experience with the IV and nurse. I am a NP and have been a nurse for 40 years. Most of us have more empathy than that although have found younger generation of nursed, not so much. I only have one decent arm vein and knew I’d be having frequent labs and IV chemo. I finished 3 months of IV Taxol first but left port in assyill have frequent labs and scans. On oral chemo know. Have you considered a port ? Easy to put in and I’ve had it 2 years this September. It’s been great. Good luck and don’t hesitate to tell person drawing your labs where your best veins are. I warm pack applied to area can help vein Standout. Wishing you the best.

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Hi Burgerde,

Thanks for the tips. I have never considered a port before. I thought it was for chemotherapy patients. I am having hormone therapy.

I was meant to be having my infusion treatment today, but first the bus got cancelled, so I went to the hospital for it instead. I waited an hour to be seen (very unusual; I normally go straight into the day unit for treatment) and then come to find out I couldn't have my Zometa until I had a blood test. I made a mistake and booked my blood test for next Tuesday, rather than for last Friday. I'm not sure where my brain was, as I have not done that before! So I had my blood test at the hospital while I was there, cancelled the one for the clinic next week and will have my Zometa infusion next Friday. It was rebooked for Tuesday, but then I had to move it to Friday, as I am having my Zoladex injection that day! Urgh! I can't believe it! At least it's nearly the weekend.

Sophie x

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Most people who get a port initially get it for IV chemo and keep it because of vein access difficulties and frequent labs. So no, if you continue to have difficulty at least discuss it with your oncologist. 🙂

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Thank you! I will bear that in mind.

Sophie ❤

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Don't worry Sophie it can happen to any of us with or without this disease. Curious what blood test you had to have prior to your Zometa. I never need such a thing before mine. I'm sure you are very glad this week is behind you and you can relax now in Denmark. Enjoy.

Sandra

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Hi again Sandra,

I always have a blood test a week prior to having my Zometa infusions, but everything got muddled up this time. I had the blood test yesterday afternoon and will have the infusion next Friday.

Off the top of my head, the blood tests check my calcium levels, ALT, RBC, neutrophils, and many other counts. I'll have to take a look at the full pathology results from last time to know for sure what else my oncologist is checking.

Sophie ❤

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Hi Sandra,

I'm back home now, so can answer your question more fully. Here's what comes up on my pathology results:

Bone profile:

Total protein, albumin, globulin, ALP, calcium, adjusted calcium, phosphate

Liver function tests:

Total bilirubin, ALT

Full blood count:

White cell count, haemoglobin, platelets, RBC, haematocrit, MCV, MCH, RDW, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, NRBC

UREA + CREAT + ELECTROLYTES:

Sodium, potassium, urea, creatinine

eGFR result

I had my Zoladex injection today so I was able to receive the latest pathology results from my GP that I had drawn last Friday. I also asked about my vitamin D, and B12, so she has ordered another blood test for the following:

B12 + Folates B12N

Ferritin FER

Glucose GLX

FBC

Iron studies TIB

TSH

Vitamin D

Sophie x

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Thank you Sophie. All the first ones you mentioned are the same that I get monthly the day before I am due to start my Ibrance plus my oncologist does the tumor marker. It's funny....where I live it is assumed everyone has a deficiency in vitamin D so if you want it tested you have to pay. My oncologist recommends supplementation to all her patients. Appreciate you taking the time to respond back to me.

Sandra

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Hi Sandra,

You're welcome! I just couldn't remember everything off the top of my head, which is why I looked at my pathology report when I got back home from my latest treatment yesterday afternoon. My oncologist has never mentioned tumour markers. I will have to ask her whether she checks that when I see her on Monday. My last vitamin D check was last March before I started treatment and my levels were actually normal, so we shall see what the latest results show. She recommended Adcal D3, so I have been getting that on prescription since last summer. I hope you don't have to pay much for the vitamin D check. Is that not covered under your insurance plan?

Sophie

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Hey Sophie, that just sucks. But I think you had an incompetent nurse today and not bad veins.

If the nurse doesn’t get a vein first time on Friday, ask for someone more experienced. (S)he should not be offended.

Best of luck ☘️

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Ahh, thank you! The funny this is, after the nurse said that the second vein collapsed it started squirting blood so it seemed to be working fine to me!

I am having my infusion at a mobile cancer unit on Friday. I don't want to have infusions at the hospital anymore. The less I can do there the better as far as I am concerned. I need to be more assertive like you said and ask for a different nurse if the first one doesn't find a vein. I am able to stand up for myself, but I just felt really upset today and didn't say half of what I should have done!

Sophie x

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Sure we’re all the same, I need to be more assertive myself. I always had lovely juicy veins but they are dreadful these days so I understand. There was nothing wrong with your vein if it was squirting . . . classic poor technique right there.

A mobile unit sounds pretty cool. I never knew such things existed (clearly I haven’t lived 🤪).

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I agree! I think my vein was just fine.

"Hope for Tomorrow" is a charity that was set up in the UK in 2007 to help bring cancer care (chemotherapy, and other cancer-related treatment) closer to home for patients in their Mobile Cancer Care Units. I wanted to use it sooner, but my last appointment was cancelled. This Friday will be my first appointment on the bus. Now they are pretty mainstream in many parts of the country. Visiting hospitals over here can be pretty stressful as most hospitals charge for car parking. So even though we don't pay for our healthcare over here, we often have to pay for parking. But that's not the case with the buses. They park up in convenient to reach locations such as health centres, supermarket car parks and so on.

Sophie x

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I’m over the pond here in Ireland and like you all my treatment/meds are free, and we have to pay for hospital parking too. I don’t mind paying though, it never bothered me. But I would like to get a space because I’m paying. Hospital car parks always remind me of shopping centre car parks at Christmas, you might get a space if you’re lucky or you might have to wait an hour and keep driving around like a fool until you get one 🙄

I don’t think we have anything like “Hope for Tomorrow” over here, but I may stand corrected. It does sound like a great option though. You might even have a bit of a laugh with the others on the bus. I hope it works out well for you. The less stress the better.

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Oh yes, of course you are! I thought you were in America. I sometimes forget where people are from on this site! I do try to keep track. I know what you mean about trying to find a parking space. It can be a nightmare! There is actually a free car park at the bottom of the hill where I attend, so we park there and walk to the hospital when I have my appointments. Or (like today) I ask my husband to drop me off and pick me up afterwards.

Maybe there are mobile cancer units in Ireland too. I just found this link for Northern Ireland.

actioncancer.org/How-We-Hel...

I'm not sure if you have anything in the Republic. It would be great if you did!

Sophie x

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Yep we pay for parking as well and certainly always impossible to get a space. My hubby takes me to all my appointments and such and drops me off at the cancer center and then goes and finds somewhere to park. I can't walk long distances anyway with my bad hip so works out fine. He never complains but if it was me I'd be way more impatience I know.

Sandra

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Sophie,

Just awful! As we all know, there is so much anxiety leading up to any scan or procedure. I'm so sorry that you had to be on the receiving end of such an inept and insensitive nurse.

A few months ago I had an especially kind nurse during the prep for my PTscan. When I commented on her kindness and skill at the end of the session, she said that she couldn't cure my cancer, so the very least she could do was to make my time prepping for the scan as easy and stress-free as possible.

Hoping you have good results from your scan.

Barbara

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Hi Barbara,

Thank you for your kindness! I thought that maybe I was overreacting or just feeling a bit sensitive. After all, it's not like this is my first CT scan. I know the drill, even though I still patiently listen to the nurses and technicians when they tell me which way to put on my gown and tie it, what the contrast will feel like as it is injected into the cannula and so on.

I'm glad you had a kind nurse treating you recently. A little kindness goes a long way. A friend is coming with me to my infusion appointment on Friday, so I know she will speak up if she sees or hears something she doesn't like!

I get my scan results on the 25th when I see my oncologist.

Thanks again!

Sophie x

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Dear Sophie

This happened to me the scan before last ..the person had great trouble putting the canula into my hand and I cried and had a horrible black bruised hand for a few weeks..never happened before !

So last time I told the nurse what had happened so she gave me a heated blanket to wrap round my arm and the needle was placed in the antecubital fossa in my arm where normal bloods are taken..it didn’t hurt and there was no bruising..I was annoyed about the previous scenario..sometimes people need a few reminders that we’re vulnerable dealing with these procedures and there is a kinder way to do things

I’m sure you’re veins aren’t the problem..ask for a heated blanket..it helps enormously

Barb xx

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Dear Barb,

How are you feeling today? I hope you are having a good day.

Thanks so much for the advice. I'll mention it to the nurses on Friday when I have my infusion.

Take care,

Sophie ❤

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Me again

Just remembered I took along ahand heating pack ( the ones you squash and put in your glove/pocket when doing outdoor sport in cold weather) ..I didn’t end up using it as they gave me the heated blanket but might be worth taking one with you

Barb xx

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What a great idea! Thank you Barb.

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I have very few veins and they are tiny and just under the surface of my skin. They are also quite tough. The nurses need to use a small butterfly needle to get them but because the needle is small it pushes the vein away rather than pierces.

If I have someone new I always warn them and they always roll their eyes at me and say that they will manage and then they struggle. And because of lymphoedema they can only use the one one arm, just to make it a bit more difficult.

One visit I went through 8 nurses! In the end the ward sister used my ankle, she warned me it would hurt but it didn’t.

A doctor told me that I had the wrong sort of blood! That was a change from my veins being blamed. And I always thought blood was blood!

Don’t let them upset you, they should be better skilled at their jobs. Plenty of people hare small veins, it’s not unusual. I’ve discovered that in the uk they need additional training and qualifications to take blood or insert a canula anywhere other than the usual place.

I find drinking a litre of fluid in the hour before the bloods are taken or canula inserted really helps, and make sure you are as warm as possible, as already suggested. Heated car seats going to the hospital helps.

If they struggle again ask for a heating blanket to be wrapped over your arm for 15 minutes, as well as a more experienced nurse. There is one technician i see who doesn’t use the alcohol wipe on me as he says that shrinks the vein. He always manages first time and i’ve never had a problem with infection but it does seem risky.

But I think what i’m trying to say is that I am the worst patient for bloods and canulas but a nurse/technician who knows what they are doing will always manage it. Don’t let them make you feel as though it’s your fault, because it’s not.

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Hi Julie,

Thanks for your advice. I think I have small veins too. Nurses should be more sympathetic and understanding, not treat us like a nuisance. I drink 3 litres of water each day, so I'm always well hydrated.

Take care,

Sophie ❤

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Hi, you sound just like me.

Robin

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Funny but not funny. I had my port put in today. It took 2 nurses 4 times and they finally put the iv rhingy where my arm bends. At first they said they couldn’t put it there because my anesthesia would flow correctly. I’ve never had trouble with this. Must be “bad stick day”! Lol

Hugs,

Stacy.

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Hi Stacy,

Sorry to hear about your experience too! I think next time if this happens I'll speak up more.

Take care,

Sophie ❤

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I'm the same way. They can't get an i'v in me. My Oncologist now sends orders for the hospital to send their i'v specialists for me.

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Hi Selmac,

Sorry to hear that. At least the hospital knows ahead of time what to expect when you have an appointment. I hope that helps.

Sophie x

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Omg Sophie! So sorry you were a pin cushion for incapable and unsympathetic nurses! Sometimes I wonder why they are there if they are not empathetic people. I also have vein problems so I get it! Hugs to you, Marianne

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Hi Marianne!

I know. It does make me wonder. It can't be easy working in the medical profession, but to be fair they did choose it. We didn't choose to develop metastatic breast cancer and to look to hospitals as being our second homes!

Sophie x

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So true. I think as with every profession, there are just some people who shouldn't be there and I'm praying that we get the really dedicated and capable people to stab our veins! I think we should be able to choose who takes our blood and who gives us our faslodex shots too based on our good experience s with them. I'm going to request certain people next time. Here's to a better experience next time. Love, Marianne

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Yes, you're right! I don't think I'll have any trouble on Friday. The nurses I get when I have my infusion seem more capable and caring. They are used to working with cancer patients, so that's probably why! I'm having lunch with four friends afterwards. I can't wait! I try to organise something nice after a treatment, scan or procedure.

Love Sophie x

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Have a wonderful Friday Sophie!

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Thank you, Marianne! x

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That is similar to what happened to me last time I had my scan. After three attempts they finally brought in reinforcements!!! Sheesh, I had plenty of bruising after that. Don't these people know what we have been through and yes maybe our veins are challenging but they are the experts and we can't be the only ones with "bad" veins. I think it was kind of insensitive for her to make those comments. Fortunately for me, they were all really nice and felt bad.

Love, Kim

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They brought in reinforcements?! Don't tell me you were "trouble" too, Kim!! Next time someone tells me my veins are a problem I might just enlighten them about my health condition. We have been through a lot. After everything we have to go through you would think staff would try to make life a little easier for us.

Love Sophie x

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Yep I am a problem child - haha. And yes, I would agree that they should be enlightened. They know why you are in there so show a little compassion.

I am not squemish at all when it comes to having my blood drawn or injecting the contrast but I really hate it when they look at the back of your hand and then start slapping it. I want to slap their's and say "so how does that feel". I had to have a transfusion last year and they had a hard time with my vein and afterwards I had a bruise on the inside of my arm that went half way down. Another indignity!! I wish I could take the nurse in my doctors office wherever I go because she is a master!! LoL.

Take care,

Kim

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Thanks, Kim! I sometimes think they just see a set of veins and arms rather than real people who have a lot to deal with.

I'm not sure the team at my hospital know why I'm in for CT scans when I stop by (patient confidentiality perhaps?) One of the technicians asked if I'd had a CT scan before. When I said "several" and that I would be seeing my oncologist for the results on the 25th the penny dropped.

Sophie ❤

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I agree. I go to the same place each time so they have my records and should know why I am there. Oh well, just another thing we have to deal with. Thank heavens we only have to go periodically. :)

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I'm also glad I don't have to go more often to the hospital for CT scans! I am having a blood test on Tuesday, but the phlebotomist at the health clinic never has any trouble with finding a vein.

Sophie ❤

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Sophie,

Sorry you had a bad experience "getting needle in." My mom and sister are same way and both end up black and blue from numerous attempts to "find a vein." I'm sure that a lot of your reaction to the stupid comments was caused more by the stress of the scheduled scan. I think there is no way to just work with the genuine "angels" in the medical community and be occasionally stuck with those who are just there for the job.

Hang in there, Sophie! Don't let an ignoramus ruin your day!! God bless you!! Linda XXOO

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Hi Linda,

Thanks for your support and kind words! I wasn't really looking forward to the CT scan, so you are probably right, but it's over now for another three months. I get the results on the 25th when I see my oncologist.

Thanks again!

Sophie x

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Hope your results are awesome!! Prayers and love coming your way!! XXOO Linda

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Thank you so much, Linda!

Sophie x

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So sorry you went through this Sophie! Thank you for posting about it though, the suggestions about hydrating and applying heat will help lots of us. I'd love to share a passage I just read this weekend from "The Cancer Whisperer" by Sophie Sabbage (love it!). She had a very similar situation....

"I went for an MRI on Good Friday this year, so there were only two nurses on duty to cannulate me...between them they made seven attempts and then sent me home....When I went to the same hospital again for my next CT scan I saw the following statement written in capital letters on my file: "PATIENT DIFFICULT TO CANNULATE". ....Three nurses came in to assess my veins, two attempted the cannulation and failed. Then they called in their supervisor....Without even introducing herself or addressing me by my name, she said to me, "You're difficult."

"No," I responded, "I'm Sophie. I understand your nurses have had some trouble with my veins, but that does not make me difficult. Or my veins, for that matter. If you believe I am difficult to cannulate, then I probably will be, but please don't blame me for it."

I love that. As many have already said here, it's not our fault if professionals have trouble doing their jobs. Sometimes we have to be "patients" but we don't have to be patient about everything!

Hope Zometa goes well for you. I take Xgeva for bone mets so it's just a shot every other month. So far so good!

Hugs!

Patty

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Hi Patty!

Thank your encouraging message. I have read Sophie Sabbage's book. Some of it was good, but I must admit that I found the overall mood of Sophie's book very depressing. She seems very pessimistic in her book, rather than trying to look ahead with confidence. She has had metastatic cancer (I can't remember what kind) for years, but she does not seem to think she has long left. We must believe and have hope, not give up!

I'm glad the Xgeva is working well for you. I have Zometa infusions every 12 weeks.

Take care,

Sophie x

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That's so interesting Sophie - wish we could be in a book group together! I didn't get that hit from the book at all. She did have a devastating diagnosis and some of her treatment descriptions are depressing but overall I felt encouraged and liked her feisty attitude. I'd love to start an online book group that focused on cancer/healing-related books...Radical Remissions, Anticancer....do you have favorites? Maybe I'll write a post to see if others are interested...

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Hi Patty,

Maybe I'm a harsh book critic, but I just didn't connect with Sophie Sabbage at all. Even though I agree she had a feisty attitude (dressing up for appointments; funnily enough I do that too when I whip out my pearls, high heels and make-up!) I just found her attitude very negative and depressing. Hmm.. That sounds like a good idea! There is one radical remission survivor's story that struck a chord. It was in the Radical Remission book. One lady used laughter as her medicine, amongst other things, to help cure her cancer. She was a single parent who was desperate to be there for her daughter, so they would schedule time each day to laugh. I really feel that having a positive attitude makes a huge difference to our physical, mental and emotional health. I think that's one of the reasons why I feel so healthy.

Take care,

Sophie ❤

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Hi,

I know exactly how you feel. I too have been having the same problems. I was supposed to get my CT back in Oct.2018 & finally got it in Jan.2019.

I tried 2 times before the 3rd & actually got it. Actually had to go over to my doc's office & let the nurses there find my vein. I was sick about all that. The nurses at the hospital had me wondering about the Ibrance. If it had caused my veins to collapse. My nurse at my onc. Office said no.

It is nerve racking to begin with much less the added stress from having your veins to collapse. Knowing you need to see if your treatment is working.

I finally got my CT done in Jan. 2019 & received good results but already dreading going back in April for the next CT.

Hugs to you & hope you have no more problems with this.

Kelly

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Hi Kelly,

I'm sorry to hear of the problems you have been having, but pleased to hear you were finally able to get your CT scan done. What a relief!

Sophie ❤

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You shouldn’t have to hear that -hydration will make the veins easier to puncture -I’ve had that problem too when several times the catheter was unsuccessful or the tech was..Hang in there..

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Thank you! I was well hydrated. By the time I arrived at the hospital I had just finished drinking 2 litres of water, with more to follow later on.

Sophie ❤

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I have the same problem and pray for someone who can do this without hurting. Started telling the person finding vein unless they are experienced get someone else. Find using smaller needle helps.

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Thank you! I will speak up more in future.

Sophie ❤

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Sorry that happened to you. I think these technicians and even nurses, sometimes, forget what we as patients go through. Of course it's not your fault for your veins! I've even reminded them sometimes that there's a person with feelings attached to those veins.

I ended up getting a port to avoid some of that. It's not for everyone though. I resisted getting it at first, but now see how much easier it is. Even with the port, when I went in for my CT last week, they were busy and didn't want to use it. I said, well, that's why I got this port -- and it was even the nurse that worked with the dr. who installed it! The other tech told me she was busy and didn't like being pulled away from what else she was doing.

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Hi Lynn,

The technician you dealt with sounds really insensitive and unkind. The medical profession is meant to be "caring" but that's not always the case.

Sophie ❤

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That happened to me on a ctscan and when my cancer nurse saw the bruise the next day he said. If they have trouble finding a vein ask them to get someone else and do not feel guilty.

We go through enough how nice do they want us to be.

When I was in hospital in aug with pneumonia that happened. I told her she could not try again send someone else. And she did . I did not feel guilty and the new lab tech had no problem. He used a butterfly and got it right away.

Barbara

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Hi Barbara,

Good for you for speaking up like that! I need to be more like that if this happens again.

Sophie ❤

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Before cancer diagnosis, I used to restrict blood taking to once a year. Now that I a m 81, I have

huge veins on the backs of my hands which offer them (and I always ask how many years experience

they have had taking blood and insisting on the most experienced and then complimenting them if they

do well. ) I find veins on back of my hand don't hurt. Otherwise I have hidden veins and lymphodemia in one arm, so am limited what i can offer.

If I stay overnight I keep them away from unnecessary blood samples with grumpiness. There is too much

bloodd taking these days, imho.

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Hi Mary,

I wish I could use the veins on the back of my hands all the time, but I have bony hands and it hurts a lot when they try to insert a cannula into my hand. The veins in my hands are great, but I prefer to avoid them if I can help it.

Sophie ❤

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It’s not your fault! Don’t let “them “ make you think that! I can only use one arm because of previous breast cancer and lymph node removal. My veins are bad and I tell them,. my veins blow, they move, the dye infiltrated my arm due to vein collapse. Had a port nine years ago, what a blessing. I am considering it, you might ask about it.🙏

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Thank you for your message. That's very kind. Sorry to hear about your experiences too. Nurses and technicians need to be more understanding.

Sophie x

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I am so sorry about your having trouble. I am new to being a pin cushion

and I am on verge of having a port installed, from which they

(inept nurses) can withdraw blood or put in any infusion

(and where a holistic d0ctor can give you IV

Vitamin C infusion, etc.---- all without the trauma or piercing an over used vein. Ill let you inow if it comes to this, how it helps or not.

One lady on here advised having the port on inner upper arm.

Anybody else have a port, can advise????

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Thank you, Mary. I'm not due to have a blood test or CT scan again until May, so I have some respite from needles! I had my second MMR vaccine recently and my arm is still bruised. I never used to bruise so easily.

Sophie ❤

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