How to get through a rough patch?

How to get through a rough patch?

I have been thinking of writing since this group was started. The truth is...I have PTSD. I spent a long time in icu and when I woke up I was changed physicallly and emotionally. Most of the time I get by well enough. Most people don't notice much about me. But I have changed. I don't like being in crowds. I prefer my own company. I rarely talk to my friends. I really don't think they can understand the fear I live with on a daily basis. Loud noises are a shock to my body, it's like nails on a chalkboard. The worst part are the flashbacks. They don't last very long, but it is so disconcerting. I saw a therapist for about six months. She explained that PTSD has to be managed like a chronic illness. I am on a wait list for more therapy. Things were going well for a while, I guess this is just a rough patch.

My question is... What are some things I can do to lessen my anxiety?

5 Replies

oldestnewest
  • I have the same but I have not been diagnosed with PTSD in fact nobody has even tried I have just about given up on talking to doctors I don't think they understand , I am constantly reminded every day about my Trauma from a vaccination, the constant different types of pain, headaches, tiredness, electric shocks through my body,and now loss of muscle in my right shoulder the list goes on, it has been nearly 8 years ,I wish I knew the answer to your question and probably many others here, best thing I do is take each day as it comes I have no choice,

    lots of love to you, john x

  • I guess you are right, take it one day (some times one moment at a time). I wish doctors spent as much time protecting our minds as they do trying to save our bodies. Good luck to you spartan300

  • Well, Twash and John - I wish I had a straight answer that would make you feel better - but there isn't one. Obviously, PTSD is the result of a bad experience but an experience that isn't always so obvious. Mine was the result of an awful hospital experience. I reacted very badly to morphine which brought on nightmare hallucinations when it was stopped. I felt trapped in the ward and just wanted to escape. Later I was left with much the same as you guys - couldn't go within crowds, avoided people, lifts were impossible and I couldn't drive past a hospital without breaking out in a sweat. At times I thought I was dying!

    No, John and Twash, people don't understand anymore than GPs can really appreciate what it's like. It's a lonely and terrifying condition. You probably feel you will never overcome all this - but with proper management and treatment, you can come out the other side. Sounds corny and stereotypical; but you have to stop hiding and face your fears - talk about it and find out what's real and what's not. It's a shame that you are on a waiting list, Tash, as it's obvious you were starting to make progress. It can take a long time and usually gets worse before it gets better - but in my case it slowly improved until I could turn around and take a long look at what it was that was terrorising me! Stick in there, both of you - and get back on here if it helps. At least there are those on this forum who DO know how you feel. Best wishes.

    David

  • Dadog1 Thank you for your reply. In a very strange way it helps knowing other people are going through it and I am not alone or making it up in my mind.

  • Its very much like having been so badly emotionally injured there is an imprint on your subconscious and conscious mind? Both active avoidance of people and situations and being subconsciously prepared do you think?

    We do operate avoidance policies in our lives, part conscious and part subconscious. Its a fairly immediate behavioral response, although the start of ptsd can be delayed for weeks, months or years after an event.

    For me its not driven by fear, its because I don't want any more trauma in my life, I've had enough.

    I just want to be left alone. I am happy to be left alone.

    That might be from one event or from several events over the years.

    My RTA in 2001 is one of several major traumatic events during my life.

    Its like being shell shocked, but calm?

You may also like...