Log in
Prostate Cancer Network
1,316 members591 posts

Early Warning Signs of Prostate Cancer

Early warning signs of prostate cancer

Pain during urination. Due to the tumor surrounding the urethra, any person having prostate cancer can feel a lot of pain during urination. ...

Blood can be seen in the urine. ...

Leakage or dribbling urine. ...

Erectile problems.

10 Replies
oldestnewest

I did not have any of these. My cancer was found with a DRE---Digital Rectal Exam. Thanks, Dr. V.

Reply

Most men "of a certain age" have the classic symptoms of an enlarged prostate, that is - urgency, frequency, hesitation, dribbling and nocturia. These all happen because the prostate acts like a dam. Urine can easily get out of the bladder so it is never properly empty. Pressure quickly builds up, hence the sensation of urgency. Even if you do pee, pressure soon builds up again, hence frequency. Unfortunately, when you try to go, also because of the dam effect, it's difficult to get started, hence hesitation. When you pee, also it's a thin stream, not the Niagara of your younger days. Whereas the kidneys slow down at night, again because of the dam effect and quick build up of pressure, you have see to get up and pee during the night - nocturia.

Sometimes, pressure in the bladder gets so high, it forces out pee despite the sphincter s holding it back, hence dribbling. Sometimes the dam effect can get to the point that no pee can get out at all. This is urinary retention and is a medical emergency. It's very painful and a catheter has to be put in to let pee out. There can be one or more litres released this way.

The old fashioned way of measuring the urinary stream was to stand on a large sheet of absorbent paper and pee on it. They then measured how far it splashed. The worse the stream was, the less far it splashed. These days a device, a flowmeter is used. It sort of looks like a bucket (pail).

If you have urgency, frequency, hesitation, nocturia, dribbling and don't splash much, it likely you have an enlarged prostate. It does NOT mean it's cancer. It's BPH

If your prostate is enlarged and it IS cancerous, then hopefully, it's either not very enlarged OR most of the enlargement is due to BPH, as well as cancer.

If your prostate is enlarged mainly because of cancer and you have the above symptoms, then the cancer is very advanced. Visible blood in the urine is also a late symptom of prostate cancer.

So symptoms should not be dismissed as just being due to BPH. Additionally, BPH can cause prostatitis or LUTS and this can raise the PSA.

Hopefully, most men will be diagnosed before having symptoms.

SUMMARY, having NO symptoms does not mean NO cancer.

Having symptoms does not mean cancer.

Having symptoms AND cancer is worrying until investigations reveal how much of the enlargement is due to BPH and how much due to cancer. The cancer could be advanced.

Other things can happen to complicate the situation, e.g. my gland was calcified in places, (like bone).

1 like
Reply

Thanks for sharing.

Reply

There's a problem with this list:

. . . Most early-stage prostate cancer _has no symptoms_.

That's why PSA screening is important!

. Charles

2 likes
Reply

Thanks for sharing.

Reply

Exactly, that is in effect what I said. Putting it bluntly anyone having the symptoms I described DUE to cancer, will probably have advanced cancer. Sorry if you misunderstood. I don't see any problem with the list.

Most men I read on here have few symptoms when diagnosed, which is promising. Conversely, I have read some men describing the symptoms and concerned they have cancer. It has turned out they haven't.

I have also read some men on here that have apparently had symptoms AND raised PSA and their doctors have told them it was prostatitis, persistently until such a point that when cancer is finally diagnosed, it has become advanced.

2 likes
Reply

Thanks BobJensen. The main message I like to tell other men is to listen to what your body is telling you. Yes, most of those symptoms are not indicative of PC, but it is far better to have things checked out before you just pawn it off as an enlarged prostate. I had both frequency and urgency and after 6 months of putting up with it I finally told my doctor about it. He suggested I go see a urologist. First came the PSA (5), then the DRE (something firm he did not like), followed by the biopsy (half filled with PC, Gleason (3,4) 7. I was 52 and wanted it out yesterday. Two months later it was, and the rest is history.

1 like
Reply

Thanks for sharing. I am glad you had surgery.

Reply

Lots of similarities here. Age at diagnosis 52. Gleason 3+4 (only 5% Gleason 4 fortunately) 20cc out of a 60cc prostate cancerous. Some possible urinary symptoms but nothing clear and I attributed them to possible BPH.PSA 5.9

Surgery seems to have got it all - PSA zero after 3 years, but I lost erections permanently.

1 like
Reply

Thanks for sharing. I am sorry about your loss of erections.

1 like
Reply

You may also like...