Pernicious Anaemia Society
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Cartoon - B12 on the farm

Cartoon - B12 on the farm

I promised a farm cartoon to someone but my memory is bad, it was always poor and B12 deficiency, even with plenty of injections, has made it worse, and I can't remember who I should dedicate it to. You may (will) have to enlarge the view to read it.

My new laptop is not so good with graphics so my lovely pink pigs have lost a lot of their colour, and the B12 looks anaemic.

I bet most of you did not know those were Belted Galloways either!

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Lol. Love it... I'm in D&G so belted galloway my local gals

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Nonameavailable Hi. I'm intrigued by your D&G the only things I could come up with were 'Dolce & Gabbana' and 'Doom & gloom', but neither seemed quite right.

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Dumfries and Galloway - I suspect.

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Blame it on the B12 D I never thought of that!

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I blame my B12 or lack of for all my "Doh" momentr

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Lol

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My ancestor left Midlothian in 1832 and went to India and there we remained until 1947 and I have never got as far as Scotland - perhaps I should visit while I still can.

The cold puts me off, I am happiest when the temperature is about 40 centigrade.

How does one do those little circles, symbol for degrees?

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Like this ° :-)

Copy one that already exists. But you don't need one for Celsius - it is just 40C. Which is far too hot for me.

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Thanks 1,000,000 beginner1! Such a shame we aren’t farm animals isn’t it? Yes , I did recognise the Belted Galloways . There are some a mile away from where I live in Gloucestershire !

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I knew you would know , you told me about them.

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Was it HCC2 beginner1?

Brilliant cartoon again - with a very ani-mated vet and a typical Dr. NO.

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clivealive Was trying to think what HHC2 meant, another D&G? Huge hippos cheat also ?

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HCC2 posted a comment in effect saying that she was going to have her B12 injections done by "her young man" who is used to doing them to animals as he works on a farm.

Sorry if I confused you

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clivealive Nope it was at least a month ago, probably more.

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Wonderful cartoon - So many thanks beginner1 - a great end to a perfect day !

I specially love the Belted Galloway (my daughter used to call them 'bandaged cows'). I moved from near Ivinghoe Beacon, Buckinghamshire, two years ago, where they used to wander all over the road.

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It's not only B12 knowledge one gets on this forum, I learnt about Belted Galloways from wedgewood the other week, couldn't resist putting them in.

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So glad the piggies are first in line - have good reason to be grateful to them for keeping so many of us well with their natural dessicated thyroid - so Dr NO can go ...........

PS This was the original request to cheer us up and has certainly done that 😀 🤗

healthunlocked.com/pasoc/po...“humanitarian-award

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Thanks Polaris. I remember now, but my search didn't bring it up.

And thanks for the idea.

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YOUR idea beginner1 😍 🤗

healthunlocked.com/pasoc/po...

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My (late) sister Hilary and I cycle "visited" Ivinghoe in 1954 - I was 12 and she was 14 as recounted in my "memoirs" "Clive Alive - with God in my Life"

On this occasion we were breaking new ground by heading South East from Birmingham instead of the usual South West towards Malvern. Our first stop was at Stratford on Avon about 30 miles from Home. The Youth Hostel here was a huge building in the town itself, was commercial and very impersonal – we did not like it much.

The next day saw us on the road to Banbury 26 miles away. This was in the far off, long ago days before Motorways ribboned the countryside so we had little traffic and plenty of time to enjoy the views.

From Banbury we wended our way down the then A41 via Bicester and Aylesbury to Ivinghoe Beacon which nestles in the shadow of the Dunstable Downs (Whipsnade hills). How we ever got up Tring Hill I just don’t know. Little did I realise then at the age of 12 that I would end up living in Aylesbury just 6 years later. I will always remember the weather the night we checked into the Hostel at Ivinghoe. After dinner Hilary and I decided to walk across the field to the Windmill and the wind was so strong as to nearly blow us off our feet.

From Ivinghoe we wended our way through Dunstable and Luton but after this passage of time I cannot now remember where we stayed overnight. What I do recall is that we were heading for Braintree in Essex probably passing through Bishop’s Stortford en route – (another place that was to loom large in my life some 50 years later).

On our way north towards Cambridge we ran into a snow blizzard. It can be imagined that we wore only shorts and light clothing and on those exposed roads in that flat countryside there was nowhere for us to shelter. Fortunately a flat backed lorry overtook us as we battled on through the snow blanket, pulled up and offered us a lift. In 30 seconds flat the bikes were on the back and we were in sat shivering in the cab. As it turned out it was no more than an April shower and we soon ran out of it into brilliant sunshine. Nevertheless the driver insisted on taking us on into Cambridge where we were staying the night.

What had started out as the longest stretch of 72 miles turned out to be one of the quickest and we arrived too early to check in. Still it gave us an opportunity to have a look round the city.

I have no idea how we got back home, probably via Coventry (or Rugby even?) but we got back eventually, safe and sound.

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Wow what a trip for a 12 and 14 year old. I am full of admiration. My other thought was that you were nuts even at 12. (just kidding)

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I was about 8 when I joined the Y.H.A., 9 when our mother dragged us round, or was it "under" the Lake District (It seemingly rained non-stop) and Hilary and I used the Malvern Hills as the place to go on our bikes for a couple of days away.

Remember this was back in the early 1950s and although you may think (or know) I'm nuts it was purely "cycle-logical"

We had no fear for our safety and no other means of transport - what a different world it was back then.

The following year we did a 750 miles ten day tour down to South Wales, along the coast all the way up to Dolgellau and then across the mountains back to Birmingham. The year after (our last holiday together) we hiked round the Peak District.

I didn't dare let my two daughter ride their bikes up to the shops on the estate in the 1970s

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Ah what memories Clive - an incredible journey for two youngsters - we had such freedom to roam and play with less worries about safety and traffic.

My best memory of Ivinghoe Beacon was much later - collapsing on the the ground in relief after walking The Ridgeway from the standing stones in Avebury, Wiltshire - 85 miles in five days, not counting walking to and from the B & Bs.

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I love Avebury, prefer it to Stonehenge. It seems to have more atmosphere.

I remember a lovely sunny, summer lunchtime sitting among the stones with a glass of "good English beer, and I hope those strawberries are English too, I don't want American ones." said my American companion.

We spent hours looking at every henge too.

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beginner1

This picture is just fantastic! :) Thanks so much for sharing it.

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Fantastic picture - thank you very much! ❤️ x

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This puts into a picture exactly what was said to me over 3 weeks ago by the altzeimers specialist I was assessed by, who was sending a letter to my GP advising that my issues were in her opinion b12 related, and told me to expect my GP to contact me in response to her letter. Nothing. Much like the response following letters from the spinal team and urology! I don't understand the arrogance of these generalists as they dismiss the advice of people they've referred us to!!!

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That is horrifying to hear Baggy - exactly the response we had after writing (with history and research papers) to psychiatric specialist and surgery about family member.

I want to send this cartoon to all these clinicians who ignore, refuse to listen or read all the latest evidence and research.....

Oh, and most of all, Jeremy H - "humanitarian" ! I don't think so 😤😡🤐

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Hi Baggy8 Would a letter, to the specialist you saw, telling him/her you have had - - - all in response from your GP, be an idea.

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Thanks beginner1, I think you are right, and have definitely made me think and question my apathy!!! The letter from urology was apparently 'lost' by my current GP, and the letter from the spinal team was deemed 'wrong' by my previous GP. I'm aware that I have got to the stage of anticipating and accepting dismissal from my practice which is why I've not pushed for a response from my latest specialist. I intend to make an appt with my named GP, who I've never met, and have a last try with this practice. Thanks again beginner1.

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I have 3 GP's I refuse to see, but finally found a good one, so perhaps you will be lucky too.

I was phoned and told everything was 'normal' - luckily the eye people found the problem 4 months later, and I had to have 2 operations.

I think it is worth checking all blood tests and reports of x rays etc. You are entitled by law.

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Wow - what a great cartoon. Such a talent and not at all affected by B12D :-) x

Thank you !

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Hi Marz Yes thankfully my drawing has not been affected too much. I've just started going to life drawing classes again after a break of two years. I've been going to the same ones for twenty years. Good company and good for the brain.

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Fab !

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Love the cartoon can i ask is it all your own work!My stepdaughters border terrier has a food allergy lives on a special diet and had B12 injections and now on tablets.Love the llamas but my favourites are the hens!Know how it is with the memory and wondering what or who or even where you were going to or who with and what you were going to say.Glad you have kept your sense of humour x

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Love the cartoon beginner1, it puts it perfectly. Our daughter's cat was near death once from myxomatosis caught from the pet rabbit who lived in a run on the lawn. The vet gave him a B12 shot and said he would put him down if he was still suffering in a couple of days. That cat eventually succumbed 15 years later when he was around 28 after a shaking by a young lurcher. We always said if the quack gave us the death sentence talk we would go and ask the vet for a vitamin shot.

Only yesterday I was with a 91 year old profoundly deaf cousin at a regular health check at the surgery. We have noticed the big bruising on his hands is more pronounced in the month before his 12 week B12 shot and he also needs help to get out of the car then. I told the GP this and suggested he had his repeats at 8 weeks. The cocky you b----r said he would bring it to 10. I did as him why not 8 as it wasn't going to kill him and might help but he was adamant. That's another one off the list, at this rate we will be looking for a new surgery next year.

I do have a client whose daughter is a vet, must keep in touch.

BTW, Countryfile had several features on Belted Galloways.

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Hi kcbrecks Don't they just make you mad, and 8 weekly is still within the allowed guidelines so he doesn't even have that excuse for denying it. Pity we can't go to vets for treatment.

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Once discussed B12 deficiency with my cat's lovely vet. He said that all the vets dreaded giving cats their regular B12 injections - it was a real struggle because they hated them so much. 'Fraidy cats !

beginner1, love all your drawings, but this is my new favourite.

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Thanks Cherylclaire

Of course, as one GP said to someone on this forum, "You ladies must love your injections"

I love them almost as much as the cats.

I loved your portrait, I'm not good at them, better at life drawing.

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So now I know why I don't like having to self inject every week, I ain't no lady.

It is becoming a real chore even though it only takes a few minutes, but necessary.

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I remember the first loading set of injections I had: the nurse commented that I never made a fuss about them like her other B12 patients. Then she said "...but then, the others are all old men, so it's not surprising."

What surprised me was that all the others were men.

And perhaps the reason that I did not complain was that I never felt the injections at all for many months, which probably says something about the condition I was in, despite a 196 nmol/L test result.

Luckily for me, I don't live in Gloucester, and so this was just out of range!

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Just had a thought beginner - are you on Facebook - seems a shame that more people can't see this ? This link to Jessica Regnartis' Facebook B12 story was posted on this forum by Ajane a little while ago - it had thousands of shares and 'likes' on FB, perhaps giving some idea how common the B12D problem is. Just wondered if you would mind sharing your great cartoon too, specially as part of her story mentioned :

" I have been told that a dog with the same problem gets a B12 injection every week and yet a human is often expected to cope with one every 2-3 months, even if they are not able to operate on this dose. I have spoken to too many other people who can’t even get out to bed. Thousands are reduced to buying their own B12 abroad and injecting themselves in secret. It’s shocking but when you hear their stories you can’t blame them. "

facebook.com/story.php?stor...

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Link didn't work - not sure if this will :

facebook.com/jessica.regnar...

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Hi Polaris I don't do Facebook and don't look at it very often. If you wanted to post it you are very welcome - perhaps with an explanation of why B12 is needed.

In fact if anyone wants to copy it and post it they are welcome.

I had read the Jessica story a little while ago. Shocking. But so many people on here have shocking stories too.

You have probably heard me ranting about the appalling treatment we get in Gloucestershire.

Thank you for your support.

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Thank you, that's really generous of you beginner1.

I only use FB in a very limited way so, having suggested this, not sure how to actually go about it 🤔 Daughter will be here for the weekend so will ask her if she has any ideas on how to make the most of the message.

Jessica's story was shocking but comforting too in that it had a happy ending and, hopefully, encouraged others to seek help. I really hope Gloucestershire will eventually come round to providing better treatment soon.....

Have a lovely Easter and lots of thanks again for raising our spirits 🤗

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