The Parkinson Earthquake and Tsunami

When the first dopamine producing nerve cells are lost in the substantia nigra it is the start of a slowly building earthquake. The earthquake occurs in the middle of the ocean so it is not initially detected. However, it does cause waves to emanate one after the other from the earthquake’s epicentre; first small waves are produced that gradually increase in size as the earthquake intensifies; eventually tsunami-sized waves are generated. It could take years for these waves to hit the shore and the earthquake to be noticed.

As the first small waves arrive at the coast, Parkinson symptoms begin to flood the land. More waves follow, causing larger parts of the land to become flooded. Once the symptoms are recognised as Parkinson’s and treatment started, costal defences are built to prevent further flooding. As bigger waves come ashore these defences are breached, requiring bigger barriers to be built further in land. Thus begins the fight to keep the flood in check as bigger waves hit the land.

There is an obvious need to prevent the earthquake from happening or to at least minimise its effect. Failing that, better coastal defences should be designed and built to preserve as much of the land as possible.

This essay was inspired by Nicola.

dr jonny

dialoguewithdisability.blogspot.co.uk

3 Replies

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  • I think the tsunami is coming down my nose today.

  • Love this metaphor! One of my carefully defended levees was over-topped last week when I had some minor dental work done, and I was in pain for four days before everything resolved. I had no idea that my response would be so drastic. Living in New Orleans, I know how important it is to maintain one's defenses from storms, including those including dopamine waves and crashes!

  • Just getting a cold overwhelms me! just being cold overwhelms me!

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