Parkinson's Movement
13,742 members12,279 posts

My first "disabled" day

In the blink of an eye, my employer decided it would be in everyone's best interest that I stop working.

While I am grateful for the ending to stressful, nearly impossible mornings - it sure feels like ending my career is a poor fit.

Today is the first day. I know I"ll make it, but I'm really shocked.

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I found it to be a hard transition, but I made it and am glad.

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Hello Barb, my thoughts and prayers are with you. I too had a bad experience with work. The same thing happened to me in 2007 after thirty-some years and I was shocked, annoyed, hurt, and bewildered. But I made it and I pray you do too. One of the best things I started doing was found a group of women and I meet with them a couple of times a week. My doctor told me the best way to stay ahead of Parkinson's is to keep yoursel mentally fit, socially fit, and physically fit. Wishing you the best.

God Bless

JerriB

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At five minutes of 5 PM on a Friday I was let go from my job...I hadn't even noticed that the office had been cleared...all of management and even my own boss had left early...and I got THE NEWS from a man that I had no direct contact with in the company (guess he pulled the short straw)...he entered my office...the one with my nameplate on the door with a cardboard box in hand and told me in a mumble to empty my desk...turn in my keys... do not touch the computer...that I was done. I had won employee of the month just two weeks before. I later heard that it was thought that I was coming to work drunk (I do not drink)...I had not discussed the possibility of PD but they knew I was having some medical test done. I was crushed and it sent me into a depression that I don't wish on anyone. I know now that the problem was their's not mine...I have picked myself up & continue to go forward...they have had at least four attempts to try & find someone to replace me! I could have remained working and doing my job well for a few more years I believe, but I too believe that things happen for a reason...and though the job loss was a real turning point it is a big part of what has gotten me to where I am today..a more understanding person...

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wow

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That does not sound legal to me. I would fight it even if you are now happy and moving on. Are you in the US? The ADA exists for a reason.

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Sue the bastards. It's not legal in the US.

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It must be tough for you, but it was only work is my attitude, its a shame people do not have the experience tact and understanding to appropriately deal with situations of ending employment. That is why we need more people especially employers to be more aware of PD and the effects on peoples lives. My husband had to give up work many years ago but has kept very active in many ways he is chairman of our local PD branch and involved in many other outside activities . He may be slower somedays but it all gets done very well, and he treats everyone holistically. We all learn a lot from each other. Good luck and keep up your spirit you will find something to suit you in your own time and you will not need an alarm clock to do it. Make sure you check out all benefits etc you may be entitled to.

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I too was recognized as a top employee as a rank and file and then as a supervisor. I worked for a company that had won awards for their work hiring the disabled.

I was quite surprised when I asked for help reducing my workload (twice that of other supervisors, requiring 60 hours per week). Even with a doctor's report stating a need for a part time work load, I was ignored until I was finally told that I couild take a demotion and lose my supervisors long term disability benefits (to a job requiring handwriting which I couldn't do anymore) or take disability retirement.

It took me a while to realize that their decision was a gift. I have enjoyed 7 years of retirement and my health has been the better for it. Getting away from the workload and stress made all the difference.

aloha Jill

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Isn't it a blessing when we can see often difficult situations and events as a gift...I think it is amazing. Instead of screaming WHY ME I find many PD folks instead say "So what are we going to do about this now?"

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unlike a lot of you , i was relatively lucky - despite my falling downstars and being off work for 3 months - my company were great to me nad gave me a wonderful send off when at the age of 61 i decided to retire - i am so Glad i did though as 'IT' was already showing up as strange handwriting and incontinance - so i was so happy to be able to stop work and relax a bit - i took my pension and my husband kept ion working so we were ok fianancialy - so there we are or here we are - in france and just about to go back to uk - if we can sell our house here - it us alarge housedue to the fact my aunt wanted too come with us and be independant - so we bought ahuge hiuse with a beautiful appARTMENT ON THE GROUND FLOOR for my aunt and w ehave been very happy here for neraly 4 years - untuk my aunt syas - she is not happy here and wants to go back to SELSEY -

SO WE HAVE TO SELL UP - IF ANYONE IS INTERESTED IN BUYING OR JUST NOSEY - WE ARE ON A WEBSITE - magnoliapropertires.co.uk and then look near limoges for a house priced at 310,000 euors

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unlike a lot of you , i was relatively lucky - despite my falling downstars and being off work for 3 months - my company were great to me nad gave me a wonderful send off when at the age of 61 i decided to retire - i am so Glad i did though as 'IT' was already showing up as strange handwriting and incontinance - so i was so happy to be able to stop work and relax a bit - i took my pension and my husband kept ion working so we were ok fianancialy - so there we are or here we are - in france and just about to go back to uk - if we can sell our house here - it us alarge housedue to the fact my aunt wanted too come with us and be independant - so we bought ahuge hiuse with a beautiful appARTMENT ON THE GROUND FLOOR for my aunt and w ehave been very happy here for neraly 4 years - untuk my aunt syas - she is not happy here and wants to go back to SELSEY -

SO WE HAVE TO SELL UP - IF ANYONE IS INTERESTED IN BUYING OR JUST NOSEY - WE ARE ON A WEBSITE - magnoliapropertires.co.uk and then look near limoges for a house priced at 310,000 euors

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unlike a lot of you , i was relatively lucky - despite my falling downstars and being off work for 3 months - my company were great to me nad gave me a wonderful send off when at the age of 61 i decided to retire - i am so Glad i did though as 'IT' was already showing up as strange handwriting and incontinance - so i was so happy to be able to stop work and relax a bit - i took my pension and my husband kept ion working so we were ok fianancialy - so there we are or here we are - in france and just about to go back to uk - if we can sell our house here - it us alarge housedue to the fact my aunt wanted too come with us and be independant - so we bought ahuge hiuse with a beautiful appARTMENT ON THE GROUND FLOOR for my aunt and w ehave been very happy here for neraly 4 years - untuk my aunt syas - she is not happy here and wants to go back to SELSEY -

SO WE HAVE TO SELL UP - IF ANYONE IS INTERESTED IN BUYING OR JUST NOSEY - WE ARE ON A WEBSITE - magnoliapropertires.co.uk and then look near limoges for a house priced at 310,000 euors

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I applied for jobs at the beginning of 2011 and each time I told the prospective employer that I had PD I was told in a round a bout way that I had not been successful. My PD really affects my energy levels and I suffer with really heavy painful legs, I have now accepted that it is difficult for me to work so I have now given up looking for work and feel much better for it. I keep myself busy during the day but would like to meet other people with PD so I could talk to someone who knows what it's like.

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I know what you are saying. It's sad to realize this was the right thing for me to do. I was so stressed out, tired and miserable for the last 5 or 6 months and I nearly totalled my car five times.

Now I've got to work on all the paperwork for disability - my incime will be cut by 2/3 and my normal reaction - get another job or two to make it up is not going to be the solution this time.

Have you looked into a PD support group?

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I wish that I could do something besides brood over this curse.

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I was told by the company owner that I was being let go because I could not perform as well. I filed a complaint with the ADA, but they say you need at least 2 employees that will testify in your favor.

The best thing to do is apply for Social Security Disability as soon as possible.

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This kind of experience happened to me AND I was employed in a Govt department. On 4 December I was a regular admin officer in xxxxxxxxxxx dept, but 8th, one day after diagnosis, they began to question my fitness for the job. By May, they had decided I coudnt do the job, all the office mistakes were made by me etc and gave me 2 choices, leave or be sacked. This was an English Civil Service job.. What an example to the world of how to treat someone with a disability!

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I am sad for every one of you who has had to go through this. It's bittersweet to see that I am not alone.

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I held the position of office manager (managing myself) in a very busy very successful primary school office for 8 years, I had very little time off (one week for shingles) in all that time. I noticed that my left hand was weakening, but my head teacher loved to dictate her letters and I used to get progressively embarrassed at my typing skills. It's funny when I look back but this little default in me seemed to open many doors of criticism. I eventually felt that the job was too much for me and reduced my hours to 3 days per week. When I spoke to my head teacher about reducing my hours, she said she totally agreed and that she had noticed I wasn't 'coping' with my job. When I was sent for an emergency neuro appt my husband phoned my head teacher at home to tell her I would be off work for the rest of the week to have various tests done and that I would be leaving my post at the end of that term, he knew something was wrong with me as I did but we didn't know what. He was very distressed seeing me return from work upset so often. My headteacher actually wept to him on the phone. When I returned to work the following week we both wept, it was so sad for me that we had worked together for 9 years and when my health deteriorated she had always presumed and in fact joked that it was 'my age' (50)! Although I knew it was a right time to go for the good of the school, although I do feel a tad bitter. I am very,very lucky in that my husband has a good job and we did not rely on my salary, but what if we had? There were days when I was made to feel like rubbish and totally inadequate. This has stirred a lot of feelings ggggrrrrrrrrrr, I apologise for my rant xx

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I'm glad you told your story. I don't care if you rant....it's honest. I've been so so angry at the disease, because it just won't stand up to the stress...Just when I thought I could do it, something would give and my lessons or our concert or whatever I was attempting would slowly shrink to the unprofessional.

And unfortunately I have been the only paycheck throughout this marriage and to know that I cannot bring in that income anymore is still a shock -- not real. I'm on sick leave until June and then I go to disability (1/3 of my salary). Not to be ungrateful, we'll still have health insurance because of the Teacher's Union. And fortunately my in-laws will come to live with us and we won't have to worry about the bills being paid, but it

still doesn't erase the pain and loss.

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When you see yourself as a "worker" and have worked hard and dedicated yourself to your job, your job is part of who you are. Having this taken away leaves a great big hole in your life and part of who you are is gone. Also gone is most of your co-workers and peer group. Your friends and family are busy working and have little time when all you have is time. Takes a while to fill that emptiness but it can be considered a gift eventually, but it takes a while to get to there.

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Barbara the road ahead is fraught with the unknown but just handle each moment as best as you can. I’m now into my 13th year but only the last 18 months has been the hardest. I was just reading my emails particularly Health Unlocked when my numb fingers accidentally dropped into this space requiring some action. Mornings definateky the worst time for me. After 13 years on Madopar it has given me severe Dyskenesia which is nasty. What choice was there. Had to have something to give me a bit of quality. Mobility I mean. I don’t plan on giving up. The Dyskenesia abates as the Madopar wears off so I do have a little respite and every day is different. Some days it’s not so bad. Maybe today is one ...for both of us.

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I wonder how Barb070 is doing nowadays. This thread was initiated by her 6 years ago and after searching I found no new posts by her.

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