How does what's in your gut affect yo... - Parkinson's Movement

Parkinson's Movement

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How does what's in your gut affect your brain?

Farooqji
Farooqji

LOVE YOUR GUTS. 90% of your serotonin is made in your guts and you have hundreds of trillions of friends clinging to you at all times. Microbiologist Dr. Elaine Hsiao is a total badass who runs her own lab investigating the role of the gut biome in behaviors. She sat down to chat about anxiety, depression, elusive fecal transplants, autism, epilepsy, kombucha promises, autoimmune disorders, probiotics and more. Alie fanned out pretty hard and asked all of the questions about how your beloved, simmering insides affect your brain. It's gut-busting, mind-blowing info.

player.fm/series/ologies/mi...

8 Replies

Thanks for sharing. I listened to the entire interview. Very interesting.

I listened to part one of the Microbiome series last night . See my other posted today,

Here is part 2 . Also very interesting.

interconnectedseries.com/ep...

Good information. Not my style of presentation. I think I'm too English for all this "like, wow, amazing" stuff. "So" and "Like" are my two least favourite words. But the topic is the future of health care in my opinion.

I was particularly interested in the confirmation that a keto diet changes the microbiome, and that they were looking for a probiotic to enable kids with epilepsy to get the keto benefit without doing the diet. That seems to support my idea that the keto diet which seems to have a strong following in PWP is working through microbiome change. Maybe there are better ways to skin the cat

Kia17
Kia17 in reply to WinnieThePoo

Winnie

I also think that the Ketogenic diet changes the microbiome. Kia

WinnieThePoo
WinnieThePoo in reply to Kia17

Which loops me back, like a stuck gramophone record, to want to enable a proper trial to measure the microbiome of pwp, and see to what extent that can be changed by diet, probiotic or faecal transplant, and what the consequences of that change are. It seems such an obvious, urgent, low budget, short time frame, potentially high reward research objective it is maddening none of the big pd research charities are contemplating it.

Fecal transplantation or bacteriotherapy is undoubtably beneficial to PD but I think need more time to see the long term benefits.

WinnieThePoo
WinnieThePoo in reply to Kia17

Are you saying you have had a faecal transplant? I would be interested to learn more if you have.

Kia17
Kia17 in reply to WinnieThePoo

No, I haven’t. Just my opinion.Too early to rely on as a line of treatment.

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